Gastric bypass on the NHS?

Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#1
From the BBC BBC News - Man appeals for NHS gastric bypass surgery

BBC News said:
At 22 stone his Body Mass Index (BMI) is about 43, but in North Staffordshire only patients with a BMI over 50 are routinely treated with weight loss surgery. A decision to refuse him funding as an exceptional case was upheld in an earlier court hearing.

Now Mr Condliff is taking his legal battle to the Court of Appeal in a case that has implications for many other areas.

NHS North Staffordshire makes its decisions for exceptional funding on the medical condition of the patient, and rules out considering their personal circumstances.
Prisoner at home

As a result of his diabetes Tom Condliff has lost the sight in one eye, and he also has kidney problems. He can no longer stand or walk for more than a short time and relies on his wife, Lana, to help him wash and dress.

He says that during his legal battle his quality of life has worsened, and even an extremely calorie-restricted diet has failed to help him lose weight.

"I've been given about a year to live by one of the specialists. I feel more and more poorly each day, my diabetes is way out of control."

Having failed to overturn the initial decision to refuse a gastric bypass, he is now resting his hopes on asking the courts to compel the NHS to take into account the impact on his life and that of his family.

"My wife barely goes out, because she doesn't want to leave me. It's awful just being locked indoors. It doesn't matter where you live, how nice it is, it's still a cage. "
Human rights challenge

The Court of Appeal will hear evidence from both sides on whether Article 8 of the Human Rights Act should be applied to how the NHS makes decisions on funding. It sets out the broad right to a family life.

In common with many other primary care trusts, North Staffordshire has a policy of only considering medical evidence when it makes decisions about exceptional funding. The trust says it is part of a commitment to deal with all patients in a fair and even handed manner.

In order to be granted exceptional funding a patient has to show he would have a greater than average medical benefit from any treatment.

If Mr Condliff was successful, the PCT would have to look again at his case, but could still reach the same decision. It might also open the door to further legal challenges.
Regional differences

Although this will not be considered by the court the case also highlights the variation in funding for weight loss surgery.

The guidelines for the NHS in England and Wales suggest patients should be considered if they have a BMI of over 40, or lower if they have other serious medical conditions.

The Royal College of Surgeons has argued that many patients who meet those criteria and could benefit from an operation are turned down at local level for NHS treatment.
Should the over weight be allowed to get treatment on the NHS? Personally unless there are unusual circumstances then no. He could've got his weight under control whenever he wanted, no one forced him to stay at home eating pies and not doing any exercises.

Should we, the tax payers, be expected to pay for over weight people?
 
#2
From the BBC BBC News - Man appeals for NHS gastric bypass surgery



Should the over weight be allowed to get treatment on the NHS? Personally unless there are unusual circumstances then no. He could've got his weight under control whenever he wanted, no one forced him to stay at home eating pies and not doing any exercises.

Should we, the tax payers, be expected to pay for over weight people?
Depends on the long term cost benefit.
If its cheaper to treat with a gastric bypass than allow it to develop into something much more expensive then it probably makes sense
 
#3
He says that during his legal battle his quality of life has worsened, and even an extremely calorie-restricted diet has failed to help him lose weight.
Well, gastric surgery isn't going to help then!
 
#4
My top tip for all those **** off big fat American lookalike "large me up" style bastards:

Beat the waiting lists and avoid those oh so inconvenient doctors appointments, (always whilst McDonalds are open)! How? Simply spend a few minutes each day munching through your bargain "Supersized Vat of fried Chicken large me up to **** and ram that ******* coleslaw" whilst hanging about in the medievil and insanitary local NHS hospital waiting room. There you will eventually catch something very dire indeed and your fat lardy arse will simply fall off all by itself.
 
#5
Supposedly he'll be dead soon anyway, just keep delaying the surgery till he's no longer a problem then we can turn him into soap.
 
#7
From the BBC BBC News - Man appeals for NHS gastric bypass surgery



Should the over weight be allowed to get treatment on the NHS? Personally unless there are unusual circumstances then no. He could've got his weight under control whenever he wanted, no one forced him to stay at home eating pies and not doing any exercises.

Should we, the tax payers, be expected to pay for over weight people?

No NHS treatment for fast basts?


I felt a great disturbance in the Force, as if millions of whets suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#8
Depends on the long term cost benefit.
If its cheaper to treat with a gastric bypass than allow it to develop into something much more expensive then it probably makes sense
True, I had meant to address this in my original post but was running late for work.

I think that people who've gotten over weight through no fault of their own for reasons like injury, illness and the like should be helped by the NHS but should be expected to help themselves as well. For example helping someone with nutrition, dietary requirements and free or discounted gym membership and if those don't work then give them surgery, but only if they've been putting the effort in.

There's no point helping people too lazy to help themselves, it just gives other lazy people the message that the NHS will hold their hand and they won't have to do any hard work or try and take care of themselves otherwise. Of course this might raise the cost to the NHS, but I'd rather pay for a fatty to go to the gym (as long as they actually use the membership) than have surgery.
 
#9
Depends on the long term cost benefit.
If its cheaper to treat with a gastric bypass than allow it to develop into something much more expensive then it probably makes sense
A gastric bypass doesn't always work, many of the greedy fat fucks just pie out on high calorie foods like mars bars instead and can still be fat bloaters..


ETA:



Get out of that chair lardarse and you'd lose some weight!
 
#10
At the risk of attracting incoming, I met my partner online and to say she was a chunky munkey was an understatement. We've been together 7 months and in that time she has lost six stone through healthy eating and continuus running. She couldnt run to the end of the garden when we met, now we're out five nights a week and both doing the Great South runs and Liverpool Marathon. I have nothing but contempt for weak willed people who cant get off thier fat arses and burn some calories without whinging about it. She has a stressful job (she earns a lot gives great head and isnt averse to taking it uop the wrong 'un now and then so I was able to happily overlook the six stone - glad I did now!!) but we still get out running either before or after work. For her, and myself its a lifestyle now, not a chore.

Yes, some people do have legitimate reasons (yes the old over active thyroid peach!) however for most fatties they should get a six month ultimatum. Shape up or waddle off.
 
#11
Well when he dies there will be lots more pies for me,,,,
 
#12
At the risk of attracting incoming, I met my partner online and to say she was a chunky munkey was an understatement. We've been together 7 months and in that time she has lost six stone through healthy eating and continuus running. She couldnt run to the end of the garden when we met, now we're out five nights a week and both doing the Great South runs and Liverpool Marathon. I have nothing but contempt for weak willed people who cant get off thier fat arses and burn some calories without whinging about it. She has a stressful job (she earns a lot gives great head and isnt averse to taking it uop the wrong 'un now and then so I was able to happily overlook the six stone - glad I did now!!) but we still get out running either before or after work. For her, and myself its a lifestyle now, not a chore.

Yes, some people do have legitimate reasons (yes the old over active thyroid peach!) however for most fatties they should get a six month ultimatum. Shape up or waddle off.
So you have a thing for plumpers then?
 
#13
A gastric band is a very serious op its not a ******* magic bullet though.
little point doing the op if someones not going to change their lifestyle
sounds like the poor sod want survive on the operating table.
if you get addicted to food your fucked heroin alcohol you can live without.
you have to eat or you die just not 4000 cal a day
 
#15
A defense.

I don't see any reason to penalize the porky in such a Cromwellian fashion, they have a right to risk MRSA and having an organ opportunistically stolen by a Taiwanese intern in an underfunded part-privatized shed pretending to be a hospital.

After all the UK PLC is full of these slowly waddling creatures, the only skinny folk you see are super models and Somalians.

In any case isn't it traditional for Les Rostbifs to resemble sea mammals?


And think of the value of kindred morbid obesity with the Septics who are often too fat to board a bus. A factor to consider with an electorate growing unwilling to fund a weaponized pedalo let alone a carrier group.

I read somewhere that while Britain's overpaid and barely competent doctors hate digging through lard lairs clinical evidence suggests the underweight are actually more prone to serious illness than the fat bastard demographic. Especially the ladies, repeated crash diets bugger the heart apparently. So next time you see a underfed tart with a rib showing chuck a few well battered deep fried double pizzas at them and tell them to nosh down for the good of the NHS.
 
#16
If he wants a gastric band, then make him save up with the amount of buckets of KFC chicken he spends, he could have it in a month.

what will a band do apart from choke him to death, since all you can eat is baby food after you have it.
 
#17
Lets just say I saw the potential and happily deplumped her! But yes, I do. Theyre grateful for dates and a natural low self-esteem means that they'd happily remortgage thier house to keep you in beer tokens and not run off with their skinny best mate. Whats not to like?
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#18
I can't seem to find a link to it but I remember seeing some fat tart on the Tv a while back, she was complaining that her gastric band hadn't worked and she'd lost no weight, apparently the only thing she could eat without being sick was chocolate...
 
#19
Lets just say I saw the potential and happily deplumped her! But yes, I do. Theyre grateful for dates and a natural low self-esteem means that they'd happily remortgage thier house to keep you in beer tokens and not run off with their skinny best mate. Whats not to like?
Ooops, my better half is also on here!! Its only a joke huns!!!!
 
#20
Ooops, my better half is also on here!! Its only a joke huns!!!!
So what really happened was you didn't know she was heffalump till it was too late, you got noshed off on the first date and seeing as you didn't have any better offers you kept going back for more. Depsite her high protein diet she started to lose weight and before you knew it, you were stuck in a 'relationship' with her.
She's now read your original description of her and are frantically back peddalling before your knackers are removed in a terrifically non-surgical manner.
 

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