Gas or Electric Central Heating?

I'm WFM and working in the kitchen which has an unheated tiled floor. My stockinged feet get cold and I really wish I had put underfloor heating in. Grrrrr!
Try wearing socks instead. You can wear them over your stockings if you want but I can't vouch for that. You can also try resting your feet on a newspaper.
 
I didn't try to encourage her to moan for even longer. I often pretend to be Spanish to avoid ranting monologues about how nobody has fixed a spot of mould the size of Harold Shipman's conscience in a bin store area. Unfortunately she came out while I was speaking to the postman so my Manuel Garcia routine was off limits.

Hollywood are filming the life and times of Harold Shipman, with Robert De Niro as the lead.

They're calling it The Old Dear Hunter.
 
Try wearing socks instead. You can wear them over your stockings if you want but I can't vouch for that. You can also try resting your feet on a newspaper.
Wouldn’t there a danger of breaking the screen on the newspaper and cutting your feet on the glass? 21st Century and all that.


You could always gaffer tape some carpet tiles to your shoes to give you that warm, comfy feel wherever you walk in the house.

It’s the 21st Century. Use the tech. 5 Best Heated Shoe/Boot Insoles Review (Rechargeable)
 

Mufulira42

Old-Salt
They all more or less have the same control and circuit boards to turn stuff on and off. The bottomline, financially, with heat pumps is their cost effectiveness, I had one up in Pennsylvania to heat the house. The unit I had worked as an A/C unit in the hot summer and in the winter it efectively went into reverse and instead of moving heat out of the house it collected heat outside and shifted it into the house.

Last time I looked in the UK they were somewhere between 5K and 6K. You would need to do the maths, work out your homes thermal requirements and then you can calculate the overall running cost of the unit for your house to compare it over given timeframes.

Mine, in Pennsylvania, had just paid for itself at the 3 year point, but the winters up there are of an arctic level with ground turning solid in November and not thawing properly until around late March early April. Worst place I ever lived, 'king dire.
I currently live in N Ontario with winter from October to May (last snow disappears) and am defo considering a heat pump in my retirement home 5 hours drive South on L Huron as gas is cheaper long term than electric and has the added bonus of being able to use your stove and oven for heat in event of power failure -- which does occur in rural parts. Recent adverts for stand-by gen sets running on natural gas seem to be a valid option as well
 
I currently live in N Ontario with winter from October to May (last snow disappears) and am defo considering a heat pump in my retirement home 5 hours drive South on L Huron as gas is cheaper long term than electric and has the added bonus of being able to use your stove and oven for heat in event of power failure -- which does occur in rural parts. Recent adverts for stand-by gen sets running on natural gas seem to be a valid option as well

Advice: If you get a heat pump have a vented enclosure built around it, like a small shed with slatted sides. In hindsight I should have done that in Pennsylvania. You can't describe the coldness to someone who has only lived in the UK, but you know what I mean. If an ice storm hits the coil on the external heat exchanger will freeze up and very little heat exchange can take place. If you put up a structure around it then it will protect it from that and will remain more efficient.

Personally if it were me up there where you are then I would probably go for a ground source heat pump - less prone to the finicky weather as the deep ground temperature remains pretty stable. You can always get quotes on both.
 

chrismcd

Old-Salt
Following this thread with interest. We are doing up a house on the Northumberland coast - so no chance of gas.

We are going all electric with PV panels on the roof etc and using heat pumps for underfloor heating. On the seaside so I do not expect seriously sub-zero conditions and have used Mitsubishi heat pumps on two other houses in Yorkshire - so used to the slow warm up and problems when it gets really cold.

All very well - BUT. How do you heat the water? I was wondering about Sunamp liquid crystal storage batteries?


Does anyone have any experience of them?
 
Following this thread with interest. We are doing up a house on the Northumberland coast - so no chance of gas.

We are going all electric with PV panels on the roof etc and using heat pumps for underfloor heating. On the seaside so I do not expect seriously sub-zero conditions and have used Mitsubishi heat pumps on two other houses in Yorkshire - so used to the slow warm up and problems when it gets really cold.

All very well - BUT. How do you heat the water? I was wondering about Sunamp liquid crystal storage batteries?


Does anyone have any experience of them?


Keep it simple, with appliances that don't depend on some expensive fancy company not going bust, then your fancy appliance is unrepairable.

For hot water, I'd be tempted to go for LPG via a combi boiler.

My favourite is the Intergas...... in a situation like yours, you can use the boiler purely as a water heater, or add a few radiators, by using the additional circuit .

It only takes a few pushes of buttons to have either function or both.

A wood burner is cheap enough, if fitted at the outset, as a backup on the heating.......
 

Mufulira42

Old-Salt
Advice: If you get a heat pump have a vented enclosure built around it, like a small shed with slatted sides. In hindsight I should have done that in Pennsylvania. You can't describe the coldness to someone who has only lived in the UK, but you know what I mean. If an ice storm hits the coil on the external heat exchanger will freeze up and very little heat exchange can take place. If you put up a structure around it then it will protect it from that and will remain more efficient.

Personally if it were me up there where you are then I would probably go for a ground source heat pump - less prone to the finicky weather as the deep ground temperature remains pretty stable. You can always get quotes on both.
Good solid advice Your Grace -- plan lots and execute once!
 

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