Gas or Electric Central Heating?

Though the Romans had slaves and a mass of trees to burn to warm their floors.

But what have they ever done for us?
What were the forests like before those cnuts arrived? Enslaving Britons and Celts and using the resources.
Now they want a bail out. Pah! Ice cream and the ice cream wars, that's what they gave us. In a cold country too. We had to wait bloody millennia before they gave us pizzas.
 
What were the forests like before those cnuts arrived? Enslaving Britons and Celts and using the resources.
Now they want a bail out. Pah! Ice cream and the ice cream wars, that's what they gave us. In a cold country too. We had to wait bloody millennia before they gave us pizzas.

And aqueducts......
 
Though the Romans had slaves and a mass of trees to burn to warm their floors.

But what have they ever done for us?

Yes, yes, roads , aquaducts, wine, sanitation, public baths .... but apart from that.....
What have the Romans ever done for us ?

I reckon smart slaves would learn from their masters and stood a chance of passing that on whereas stupid slaves would just pass on stupidness.
 

anglo

LE
Why is a higher temperature required? You’re only heating the room to 17-22C, so why do you need to heat the transmission medium in your system to >75C?

There are plenty of low temperature water heating systems around, often in much colder places than the UK. All those district heating systems in Scandinavian countries, artesian systems in New Zealand. Over 60% of Danish houses are heated with low temperature hot water from CHP plants.

There are also lots working successfully in the UK; Woking is a good example, but there are several PFI district heating systems around. A lot of public buildings, including barracks, have district heating.
Why is a higher temperature required? You’re only heating the room to 17-22C, so why do you need to heat the transmission medium in your system to >75C?

Yet in Denmark google says

Low Temperature District Heating (LTDH) system is defined as a system of district heat supply network and its elements, consumer connections and in-house installations, which can operate in the range between 50-55°C to 60-70 °C supply and 25-30°C to 40°C return temperatures and meet consumer demands for thermal indoor comfort and domestic hot water. This low temperature definition is pushing temperatures to the limit, see figure 1. Both new low energy buildings and existing buildings can be supplied by low temperature district heating

file:///C:/Users/PETERT~1/AppData/Local/Temp/Guidelines%20for%20LTDH-final_rev1-1.pdf

Their district heating uses a combination of ground energy, electricity, wood chips,
Ground energy is not hot enough on its own and needs boosting
 
Why is a higher temperature required? You’re only heating the room to 17-22C, so why do you need to heat the transmission medium in your system to >75C?

Yet in Denmark google says

Low Temperature District Heating (LTDH) system is defined as a system of district heat supply network and its elements, consumer connections and in-house installations, which can operate in the range between 50-55°C to 60-70 °C supply and 25-30°C to 40°C return temperatures and meet consumer demands for thermal indoor comfort and domestic hot water. This low temperature definition is pushing temperatures to the limit, see figure 1. Both new low energy buildings and existing buildings can be supplied by low temperature district heating

file:///C:/Users/PETERT~1/AppData/Local/Temp/Guidelines%20for%20LTDH-final_rev1-1.pdf

Their district heating uses a combination of ground energy, electricity, wood chips,
Ground energy is not hot enough on its own and needs boosting
There’s no global standard to define a low temperature heating system. IIRC the Building Research Establishment define LTHW as a system where water leaves the heat source at no more than 45C or 35C on the “design day”, that being the day on which the conditions where theoretical heat loss from the building is a maximum. Whatever, ground source heat at 42C is plenty hot enough to heat a building and most hot water needs.

The Danish examples are mostly Medium temperature because they use district heating. Long pipes, big losses. So the heat source delivers 55C. The house at the end of the system doesn’t receive water at 55C but it’s still warm.
 
Though the Romans had slaves and a mass of trees to burn to warm their floors.

But what have they ever done for us?
Modern underfloor heating seems to have originated with Frank Lloyd Wright, who'd experienced Korean Ondol underfloor heating somewhere on his travels and incorporated it into some one of his buildings. Ondol heating seems to have pre-dated the Roman versions.

But besides that, what have the Koreans ever done for us?
 
Instead of underfloor heating, which I'm very hostile to........ one leaking joint, and the whole bloody floor has to come up, with jackhammers, you could consider this........

View attachment 528183

many different types, and they will happily work with lower temperatures, like ground source.

Another plus, is they are ideal for small children, or the elderly, when falling against hot rads can be an issue.......
@vinniethemanxcat, What is that, any chance of a link?
 
There’s no global standard to define a low temperature heating system. IIRC the Building Research Establishment define LTHW as a system where water leaves the heat source at no more than 45C or 35C on the “design day”, that being the day on which the conditions where theoretical heat loss from the building is a maximum. Whatever, ground source heat at 42C is plenty hot enough to heat a building and most hot water needs.

The Danish examples are mostly Medium temperature because they use district heating. Long pipes, big losses. So the heat source delivers 55C. The house at the end of the system doesn’t receive water at 55C but it’s still warm.

And if I recall, houses in Scandinavian and like countries are much better insulated.

I’m involved in a couple of projects which include Passivhaus standard builds, in which there may not be any heating at all, the warmth being generated by just living in them.


But even before Passivhaus, they were better insulated. I recall being on a ski trip in Switzerland in the early 90s and the chalet had triple glazing and even factory fitted draught strips on internal doors, when double glazing in the UK was not long in to comply with Building Regs.
 
Was her meter a two rate smart meter do you know, if she is on a single rate charge
the cost will be high, she should be on economy 7
Don't suppose you remember how many night store heats there were
I didn't try to encourage her to moan for even longer. I often pretend to be Spanish to avoid ranting monologues about how nobody has fixed a spot of mould the size of Harold Shipman's conscience in a bin store area. Unfortunately she came out while I was speaking to the postman so my Manuel Garcia routine was off limits.
 
If you have solid floors downstairs, consider putting your heating into that.
Works with gas or electric, gets rid of radiators and its bloody lovely to walk on.
I'm WFH and working in the kitchen which has an unheated tiled floor. My stockinged feet get cold and I really wish I had put underfloor heating in. Grrrrr!
 
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I'm WFM and working in the kitchen which has an unheated tiled floor. My stockinged feet get cold!
Not sure what WFM means but solid ground floor spaces can be turned into a very efficient , and most pleasant to walk on radiator.
Just done one in my daughters house in Brize Norton village.
Christmas was cozy.
 

miner69er

Old-Salt
well you - or your family can take the piss:
URINE, THOUGH disdained by modern society, was once surprisingly useful stuff. Street-facing laundries in ancient Rome had pissoirs attached to them, to encourage passers-by in need of relief to provide, free of charge, a raw material which was then fermented into a degreasing agent. Urine also found employment as a mordant, to assist in the dying of cloth—Scottish tweed was once notorious for smelling of the stuff when it got wet. And urine was, too, a source of potassium nitrate, one of the ingredients of gunpowder............

behind paywall but reserachers are saying using urine on dried wood produces heat - a bit smelly but been in worse block and pub toilets. Difficlut part is getting suifficieint pisa, apparently synthetic urine does not work as well - whoda thought?
 

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