Gas Boilers

exsniffer

War Hero
Greetings All

My 15 year old gas boiler has failed it's service. I will have to bite the bullet and replace it. I will not be staying in the house long enough to make it economical enough to fit a heat exchanger .

Could you please give me your suggestions for an economical and reliable gas boiler

Thanks in advance
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Don't let Homeserve anywhere near your house.

Edit. Dig deeply into the small print of whichever company you look at. I found out too late that the company I'd selected had been taken over by Homeserve.
 
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2000AD

Old-Salt
We had a worcester bosch combi fitted a couple of years ago. Hot water comes through very quick and the radiators are all hot when needed. Didn't cost an arm and a leg even considering the fact we moved the location from one end of the kitchen to t'other with all the pipe/electric reruns needed.
 
Greetings All

My 15 year old gas boiler has failed it's service. I will have to bite the bullet and replace it. I will not be staying in the house long enough to make it economical enough to fit a heat exchanger .

Could you please give me your suggestions for an economical and reliable gas boiler

Thanks in advance
what is this 'gas' of which you speak? Out here in the sticks we're all on oil
 

bcsack

Old-Salt
I've been researching this for the past 12 months - ours is 14 yr old.
Viessman 100w -30 is the dogs for me - although the new Baxi 830 is a lot cheaper and has similar performance. Lots of these UK "Brands" are made by the same company in Leicester. Was quoted £1800 ish for a "1 for 1 swap" for the Baxi ( we're in the North East - installer was from Durham area).
 
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Ex_crab

Old-Salt
I have a friend who is a plumbing / heating instructor at a nearby Tech College. He says Worcester Bosch every time. He also says to keep the condenser drain inside the house to stop it from freezing up. He doesn't trust the heated external outlets. Something else to go wrong. If you are in a hard water area, think hard about a combi as the flow switches can lime up and stop working unless you have a water softener. I have an oil WB, not a combi, and apart from a new burner and service every year, no problems at all.
 

Daz

LE
Greetings All

My 15 year old gas boiler has failed it's service. I will have to bite the bullet and replace it. I will not be staying in the house long enough to make it economical enough to fit a heat exchanger .

Could you please give me your suggestions for an economical and reliable gas boiler

Thanks in advance
The first question should be, what did it fail on and can it be fixed
 
I have a friend who is a plumbing / heating instructor at a nearby Tech College. He says Worcester Bosch every time. He also says to keep the condenser drain inside the house to stop it from freezing up. He doesn't trust the heated external outlets. Something else to go wrong. If you are in a hard water area, think hard about a combi as the flow switches can lime up and stop working unless you have a water softener. I have an oil WB, not a combi, and apart from a new burner and service every year, no problems at all.

Oil is different to gas, apart from the obvious. They are a much simpler, robust design and basically all the same apart from the packaging and label on the white metal casing hung on your wall. Unless you find yourself with an old wall flame oil boiler, and I stress old, but they are still knocking around.

WB boilers are either loved, or hated. Owning, or fitting a WB that turns out to be a bad one is like having all the expectations of buying a new Bentley, driving it for a week then suddenly it needs to be in the workshops for some silly problems.

I dunno where Ravenheat sit now pricewise, but I always liked them and installers who have done the factory course (one day, lunch included) used to be allowed to offer a year extra on the warranty.

Top of the tree, IMHO, are Vaillant products, mind you, you pay for the privelege.

Boiler prices ===> Boilers Prices - Compare Boiler Quotes & Models

The bulk of the price is down to how much the fitter charges for his time. One for one boiler exchange is generally a one day job. They will go on about pumping and flushing the system to get the crap out and try to charge you anything up to 600 quid for the privelege. Get along to HSS and hire a flushing rig, watch a few youtube videos and go slowly and you can do it yourself the weekend before the new one is fitted.


Like I said it is generally a one day job to swap a boiler, like all trades they will use industry speak and sharp intakes of breath to bump the price. Ask all of them their hourly rate, multiply that for 8 to 10 hours work and ball park that is your starting point for negotiation. A few extra fittings and bits of wire will be on the bill too, but nothing outrageous. Locally when I was doing bits and pieces the hourly rate was around 50 quid, but the fitting charge for a boiler was 1000 to 1200 quid.

The strong negotiating position at the moment is that as it is summer there is less demand on your domestic boilers, therefore less breakdowns. So there will be some that are looking for work.
 
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I've been out 5 years now, but something else to bear in mind is dirty systems, that's why BG and others insist on a powerflush, it allegedly cleans out an old system so it won't sludge up all the fine waterways on a conventional new boiler/ combi.

Personally I'm not convinced, I've seen plenty of powerflushes with loads of sludge still in them, mostly coming from the radiators...... if someone wanted to be really sure, I'd take every rad outside, turn them upside down, run water through them, while twatting them with a large rubber mallet- also the only sure method of ridding trolls from websites.

On visits to warranty breakdowns, they often test the system water- mucky, your're out of lucky.......

As the Intergas boilers have very wide waterways, they don't block up, so they don't use this as a get out, at least they never used to

Just running a chemical cleanser, then a few flushes, then inhibitor was usually enough.
 
I've been out 5 years now, but something else to bear in mind is dirty systems, that's why BG and others insist on a powerflush, it allegedly cleans out an old system so it won't sludge up all the fine waterways on a conventional new boiler/ combi.

Personally I'm not convinced, I've seen plenty of powerflushes with loads of sludge still in them, mostly coming from the radiators...... if someone wanted to be really sure, I'd take every rad outside, turn them upside down, run water through them, while twatting them with a large rubber mallet- also the only sure method of ridding trolls from websites.

On visits to warranty breakdowns, they often test the system water- mucky, your're out of lucky.......

As the Intergas boilers have very wide waterways, they don't block up, so they don't use this as a get out, at least they never used to

Just running a chemical cleanser, then a few flushes, then inhibitor was usually enough.

One dit I got from a manufacturer when I did their installers course: A local authority was doing more or less a 100% replacement of all gas boilers in council houses, a good few thousand. The worked was offered out to plumbing firms in the city on a fixed rate price. The heat transfer vessel in the boilers being fitted was some aluminium alloy designed, and intended, for quicker more efficient heat transfer. The council started to get calls from tenants who had the new boilers fitted saying that their boiler was pissing water all over the floor. Pisspoor flushing drills by a couple of companies had resulted in a higher than should be acidic mix, and residual sludge, left in the systems. The sludge had deposited in the heat exchanger vessels, then combined with the acidic water had dissolved the ally heat exchanger vessels.

As to flushing; I think it depends on how big the lumpy bits are and whether or not you use a decent flushing solution to breakdown the iron oxide particles. I have been known to take rads outdoors and stick a hosepipe in one end to do a quick flush.
 
One dit I got from a manufacturer when I did their installers course: A local authority was doing more or less a 100% replacement of all gas boilers in council houses, a good few thousand. The worked was offered out to plumbing firms in the city on a fixed rate price. The heat transfer vessel in the boilers being fitted was some aluminium alloy designed, and intended, for quicker more efficient heat transfer. The council started to get calls from tenants who had the new boilers fitted saying that their boiler was pissing water all over the floor. Pisspoor flushing drills by a couple of companies had resulted in a higher than should be acidic mix, and residual sludge, left in the systems. The sludge had deposited in the heat exchanger vessels, then combined with the acidic water had dissolved the ally heat exchanger vessels.

As to flushing; I think it depends on how big the lumpy bits are and whether or not you use a decent flushing solution to breakdown the iron oxide particles. I have been known to take rads outdoors and stick a hosepipe in one end to do a quick flush.


Sounds like (not) Ideal boilers with their water soluble heat exchangers.

On bad systems, I'd take out one radiator stub to give me full bore at the bottom, flush and whack, and whole lengths of sludge looking like rotten wood would appear...... this would never come out with a powerflush, but would keep drifting up to keep up a good sludge level.

Great for the manufacturers, because they'd got into a pissing- contest of offering unrealistic guarantees, which they would then invalidate, claiming sludge.........

Just for your own curiousity, check out the Intergas boilers..... they're unique in having a single large heat exchanger, with both a heating and hot water circuit embedded in the walls, to make a superbly simple system.
 
Sounds like (not) Ideal boilers with their water soluble heat exchangers.

On bad systems, I'd take out one radiator stub to give me full bore at the bottom, flush and whack, and whole lengths of sludge looking like rotten wood would appear...... this would never come out with a powerflush, but would keep drifting up to keep up a good sludge level.

Great for the manufacturers, because they'd got into a pissing- contest of offering unrealistic guarantees, which they would then invalidate, claiming sludge.........

Just for your own curiousity, check out the Intergas boilers..... they're unique in having a single large heat exchanger, with both a heating and hot water circuit embedded in the walls, to make a superbly simple system.

Yup, Ideal. Happened in Yorkshire.

TBH I have never looked at Intergas, so I will have a gander.

Nowadays I am looking at specking Rinnai whole house instant hot water boilers for the project build in the US. I don't know how far combis have come in the UK in the last ten years, but these Rinnai boilers are excellent. They provide instant hot water, and I mean hot, with the American water pressure pushing the water through at speed.

 
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Rodney's boiler circa 1976 new gas valve a couple of years ago when utilitys filled the mains with dust
New hi limit stat made to fit new pump 3x valve and time clock fitted last weekend. Awesome bit of kit .all fitted by myself
IMG_20210811_194422_960.jpg
IMG_20210811_194448_026.jpg
 
Rodney's boiler circa 1976 new gas valve a couple of years ago when utilitys filled the mains with dust
New hi limit stat made to fit new pump 3x valve and time clock fitted last weekend. Awesome bit of kit .all fitted by myself
View attachment 595798View attachment 595797


That;s the good old days when Ideal boilers were built like tanks...... you can see it all in front of you, thermostat, gas valve, thermocouple and burners, not efficient by today's standards, but made up for that by lasting forever.
 
That;s the good old days when Ideal boilers were built like tanks...... you can see it all in front of you, thermostat, gas valve, thermocouple and burners, not efficient by today's standards, but made up for that by lasting forever.
I would not take a new one for free!
If it ever dies I dredd replacing it . Much to my disappointment I narrowly missed out on acquiring a new boxed old stock of the exact same boiler about 2 years ago . Still bugs me a lot .
 

stantheman

Old-Salt
we had a new gas boiler fitted by the plumber who does all our work. The boiler he has himself as well is a Viessman Vitodens 100. Two little nests/ electric gadgets come with it so with an app on the iPhone we can programme it to come on wherever we are. Great bit of kit and so glad we opted for this make and model.
 
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