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Sign of the coming spring

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Five out of six tomato seeds germinated, Gardeners Delight we try to get them off to an early start before moving them into an unheated greenhouse. Last year we started cropping in mid June and kept them going till Sept.

We also do other larger specialist tomatoes later in the year, and normally end up with far too many plants than we can fit in the greenhouse, last year I just stuck them in the garden in a patch that gets a lot of sun, they were hugely prolific so will be doing it again this year.
 
Sign of the coming spring

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Five out of six tomato seeds germinated, Gardeners Delight we try to get them off to an early start before moving them into an unheated greenhouse. Last year we started cropping in mid June and kept them going till Sept.

We also do other larger specialist tomatoes later in the year, and normally end up with far too many plants than we can fit in the greenhouse, last year I just stuck them in the garden in a patch that gets a lot of sun, they were hugely prolific so will be doing it again this year.
Well done, mine went in the greenhouse today.
 
Word of caution if biodegradable coconut husk pots turn up in garden centres as they have a habit of poisoning the soil when they rot.
 
Sign of the coming spring

Sign of the coming spring is that Mrs S sends me out into the garden to do some serious digging and other general labouring tasks!

Still, it was a lovely day and I was accompanied by a robin and a blackbird who were both interested in the worms that my labours were bringing to the surface.
 
Coconut coir is often used in potting mixes and as a soil improver, I've used it myself, that must be something added to the process to do that.
Not all coconut pots are bad, it’s only the cheap ones as the binder/glue is what’s not healthy for the soil.
 
Dug out some of my compost from the compost bin, and dug it into my vegetable patch, it was crawling with worms. Does anyone else here use Boccashi bins, excellent source of compost if dealt with carefully and correctly.
 
I'm a complete nong when it comes to gardening, and usually follow the instructions from SWMBO for digging, planting etc.
I've built some raised beds, ready for planting this year, and filled them with a mixture of compost and topsoil.
SWMBO saw something on a Monty Don TV program about using orange and banana skins to increase the fertility of the soil, and is now putting in kilos of peel. I don't think this is the right way to do it, as just putting it into the surface layer won't really allow it to decompose properly.
Any comment from the gardener's out there?
 
Coconut coir is often used in potting mixes and as a soil improver, I've used it myself, that must be something added to the process to do that.
Some coconut fibre is used in potting mixes whereas these pots are 100% coconut fiber. So whereas a little pee when diluted with water is a good thing whereas the only thing undiluted pee is good for is getting rid of ants nests.
Those orange and lemon seeds I planted at the same time in ordinary paper cups are doing fine.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
I'm a complete nong when it comes to gardening, and usually follow the instructions from SWMBO for digging, planting etc.
I've built some raised beds, ready for planting this year, and filled them with a mixture of compost and topsoil.
SWMBO saw something on a Monty Don TV program about using orange and banana skins to increase the fertility of the soil, and is now putting in kilos of peel. I don't think this is the right way to do it, as just putting it into the surface layer won't really allow it to decompose properly.
Any comment from the gardener's out there?
Should put them on the compost heap and mix in with everything else so they can decompose properly.
 
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Gardening in the tropics, expect to find snakes unless you plant plenty of garlic, ditto keeping chickens, plant garlic around the coop. Cobras in particular hate the scent although a big python braved it last year. Fortunately the local snake man only charges a bottle of Red Horse and the carcass as he loves the meat.
 
Kids have expressed an interest in growing something, so planning to plant up some potatoes with them, plus the usual chillies that I grow each year.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Should put them on the compost heap and mix them in with everything else so they can decompose properly.
Talking of compost, could I ask advice please?

I have two bins, one started in October 2019, the other last Summer. I put in kitchen peelings, garden pruning (soft), tea leaves, and some paper. Himself occasionally puts wood ash from the woodburner in there.

The first bin still hasn't fully decomposed at the bottom. It seems full of worms when I lift the lid, and I was hoping that the compost would be ready for my new raised bed, and for mulching the old ones.

What am I doing wrong?
Thank you
 
I'm a complete nong when it comes to gardening, and usually follow the instructions from SWMBO for digging, planting etc.
I've built some raised beds, ready for planting this year, and filled them with a mixture of compost and topsoil.
SWMBO saw something on a Monty Don TV program about using orange and banana skins to increase the fertility of the soil, and is now putting in kilos of peel. I don't think this is the right way to do it, as just putting it into the surface layer won't really allow it to decompose properly.
Any comment from the gardener's out there?
Yes, what you can do is dig trenches in the raised beds and back fill with peels and other green compostable items. It then apparently acts as a slow release for nutrients.
 
Talking of compost, could I ask advice please?

I have two bins, one started in October 2019, the other last Summer. I put in kitchen peelings, garden pruning (soft), tea leaves, and some paper. Himself occasionally puts wood ash from the woodburner in there.

The first bin still hasn't fully decomposed at the bottom. It seems full of worms when I lift the lid, and I was hoping that the compost would be ready for my new raised bed, and for mulching the old ones.

What am I doing wrong?
Thank you
Nothing wrong. But what you can do is stir up the bins so to spread the worms and get the composting happening throughout the bin.
You can use an accelerant to speed up the heat in the bin. You can buy it, but 'real' gardeners piss in the bin and add some straw!
 
Kids have expressed an interest in growing something, so planning to plant up some potatoes with them, plus the usual chillies that I grow each year.
Good call. I find chillies are fun but incredibly hard to eat if you are doing the lethal variety! Try cooler ones you can throw in salads.
Cherry tomatoes, both red and yellow are fun for kids.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Nothing wrong. But what you can do is stir up the bins so to spread the worms and get the composting happening throughout the bin.
You can use an accelerant to speed up the heat in the bin. You can buy it, but 'real' gardeners piss in the bin and add some straw!
If you think I am perching on the edge of the compost bin...! :)
 
If you think I am perching on the edge of the compost bin...! :)
if your compost bin is wiggling with worms you must be doing something right, they vote wiggling on their tummies. I have three plastic compost bins that take the peelings and Boccashi in line, as one is full I start on number two ect, once the bin material is at an advanced stage of decomposition, and will no longer attract little furry characters, I transfer it to my open topped wood compost bin to let it turn into nice brown crumbly compost ready to dig into the flower beds and veg patch. You could ask his Majesty to take a pizz over the edge to speed things up.
 
Kids have expressed an interest in growing something, so planning to plant up some potatoes with them, plus the usual chillies that I grow each year.

A suggestion. Spuds take a lot of effort in soil preparation and are cheap anyway. Try runner beans, easy to grow and more of a show.
 
if your compost bin is wiggling with worms you must be doing something right, they vote wiggling on their tummies. I have three plastic compost bins that take the peelings and Boccashi in line, as one is full I start on number two ect, once the bin material is at an advanced stage of decomposition, and will no longer attract little furry characters, I transfer it to my open topped wood compost bin to let it turn into nice brown crumbly compost ready to dig into the flower beds and veg patch. You could ask his Majesty to take a pizz over the edge to speed things up.
In days of old the chamber pot got sprinkled over the rhubarb and in the compost bin. The roses got a jolly good dousing after the Sunday lunch!
 

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