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Gardening Forum?

Londo

LE
Question on carrots
I have two smallish raised beds 1mtr x 1mtr given over to mostly carrots this year .
Didn't rally thin them out as normally when I thin out along come the snails and thin out even more leaving very few . Didn't happen this year so quite a few although most are quite small .

My question is is it better to pull them in the next couple of weeks and store in sand or leave them where they are and just harvest some when needed ?

Also can I do half and half , pull and store some and leave the rest to possibly grow some more now they are thinned ?
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Question on carrots
I have two smallish raised beds 1mtr x 1mtr given over to mostly carrots this year .
Didn't rally thin them out as normally when I thin out along come the snails and thin out even more leaving very few . Didn't happen this year so quite a few although most are quite small .

My question is is it better to pull them in the next couple of weeks and store in sand or leave them where they are and just harvest some when needed ?

Also can I do half and half , pull and store some and leave the rest to possibly grow some more now they are thinned ?
As the weather's so good, leave them where they are for now, just don't let them dry out or they will split.
 

Londo

LE
As the weather's so good, leave them where they are for now, just don't let them dry out or they will split.
Thank you . Will do that .
Normally I grow my carrots in a row of large pots but last year they were quite badly infected by carrot fly so had to plant elsewhere .
Also each raised bed had four tomato plants in tomato pots but had to pull them a couple of days ago as they had a touch of blight . Plenty of nice big tomatoes in the kitchen and the freezer though .
My two types of salad tomatoes seem unaffected so far .
Think the blight may have come from the field behind the garden as they have just harvested their potato crop .
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Thank you . Will do that .
Normally I grow my carrots in a row of large pots but last year they were quite badly infected by carrot fly so had to plant elsewhere .
Also each raised bed had four tomato plants in tomato pots but had to pull them a couple of days ago as they had a touch of blight . Plenty of nice big tomatoes in the kitchen and the freezer though .
My two types of salad tomatoes seem unaffected so far .
Think the blight may have come from the field behind the garden as they have just harvested their potato crop .
You remind me of a weird conversation on Thursday evening. My next door neighbour is 78, and her boyfriend comes to stay for long spells, helps her with DIY, gardening, etc. (As an aside, the sight of a portly gentleman of mature years on the other side of the garden fence, wearing just a pair of faded shorts is not for the faint-hearted, but I digress)

As I wandered up to water my plants, i was greeted with 'Tomatoes got the blight yet?'

Either it's an MI6 greeting, or he's on the spectrum ....
 

Londo

LE
You remind me of a weird conversation on Thursday evening. My next door neighbour is 78, and her boyfriend comes to stay for long spells, helps her with DIY, gardening, etc. (As an aside, the sight of a portly gentleman of mature years on the other side of the garden fence, wearing just a pair of faded shorts is not for the faint-hearted, but I digress)

As I wandered up to water my plants, i was greeted with 'Tomatoes got the blight yet?'

Either it's an MI6 greeting, or he's on the spectrum ....
That must have been another fat bloke . Not me :mrgreen:
 

philc

LE
You remind me of a weird conversation on Thursday evening. My next door neighbour is 78, and her boyfriend comes to stay for long spells, helps her with DIY, gardening, etc. (As an aside, the sight of a portly gentleman of mature years on the other side of the garden fence, wearing just a pair of faded shorts is not for the faint-hearted, but I digress)

As I wandered up to water my plants, i was greeted with 'Tomatoes got the blight yet?'

Either it's an MI6 greeting, or he's on the spectrum ....

So you were admiring his plums then.

My next door neighbor has a terrible habit of holding conversations with my wife telling her where I am going wrong and why have I not painted the shed yet or pruned, such and such, you just see his head, a bit like Tool Time with Tim Allen. Should not complain too much, he is my Dad after all.
 
I started a Covid garden back at the end of March, it was a bit of shits and giggles thing tbh, but as time (and the lock down) went on I grew (pun) into it. My next door neighbour gave me some great tips and a few plants he had seeded indoors earlier in the year.

I started with some old 2 x 10's I had stashed under the back deck and built a 4' x 10' wide box in front of and below (but not beneath) our patio deck. I put cardboard across the bottom and spread 2 bags of raked leaves and 1 bag of old grass clippings on top of that. I then bought 10 bags of top soil and spread that out too.

I then planted over a week or two, 4 Beefsteak Tomato, 2 Cherry Tomato, 3 Bell Pepper, 2 Hot Pepper, 3 Green Beans, all pre-grown. With seeds I did 2 Cucumber, 3 Pea Pod seeds. 4 Lettuce, Radish, Spring Onions, and Beetroot.

It wasn't long (May) before I (actually Phil the neighbour) noticed a few issues with the planting scheme. He pointed out 1) soil not deep enough - the 10 bags had sunk quite a bit, 2) plants too close together, & 3) back to front. ie, tall plants in front of small growing ones etc. Bollox,.... on to plan B.

Plan b was almost a total revamp. 30 more bags of soil, and a middle 2" x 10" x 4' cross beam < this turned out to be quite handy later. I then made the risky move of replanting the garden

I had drawn out a battle plan so after I determined the order of attack I would lift an area about 2' square, put those plants to one side, add soil, scoop and water then move in the replacement. It took me all day to rearrange the necessary items adding about 16 bags of soil in the process. I watered the garden thoroughly and left it for a day or two. I then spread the remaining 4 bags in between the tomato plants and re-seeded the Spring Onions and Radish.

The result wasn't too bad I lost 2 lettuce, 2 Pea pods and a Cucumber but the rest perked up so I saluted their undying efforts and told them to carry on growing. And grow they did.

May/June was spent looking and watering, and watering, and watering. In between I started to add a few strings nailed and tied to the top patio deck then either nailed/tied to a side plank or tied to some 2' bbq stakes pushed down into the soil. I used these to support the tall plants and hopefully prevent them snapping or tipping over in the sometimes stormy weather we get by the lake. The middle crossbeam was a handy step btw.

It was July before things started to happen the tomatoes, cucumber, lettuce and radish rocketed upwards. We had our 1st salad with our own lettuce and a radish. The lone survivor of the 3rd Pea Pod battalion lived up to it's name and gave us a massive haul of 3 fat pods and shriveled into oblivion.
1599946402827.png

Early August saw the 22 SOS (Spring Onion Seeds) disappear up their own Arrse and the cucumber grew an extra leg. The tomato plants by now were humongous and required more support strings - but no Toms yet. The beetroot were ready to harvest as were the green beans, cukes, radish, lettuce, and peppers. A decent harvest tbh.
1599946459290.png

Late August/September saw the biggest growth with everything popping up. We had our 1st Beefsteak & Cherry Toms and continue to enjoy everything else. We have made awesome Salads, Salsa Sauce, Pickled Beets, and Bacon & Tomato butties.
1599946496008.png


Mistakes & Lessons learned..
Obviously the 1st planting and lack of soil but more than that was the lack of plant knowledge. I simply had no idea just how big the tomato plants would be. Same for the Cucumber plant it spread everywhere overtaking the smaller plants and required plenty of pruning. Beetroot grow big, the Bell Peppers are big, Who knew you can peel off the bottom lettuce leaves and let new ones grow. The pea pods and Spring Onions should have been started indoors and more of them.

Despite the setbacks the wife and I really enjoyed setting up and taking care of the garden, it did become a bigger project than I first imagined but in these strange times it was a perfect time waster (so to speak) with great benefits. The smile on the wife's face as she handed out veggie goodies to every Joe & Jenny Blow that stopped by could have been smaller but that's how she is.

If you are still here: Thanks for leeting me ramble on.

Season 2 of the Cheap Gardener will begin next Spring.
 

Londo

LE
I started a Covid garden back at the end of March, it was a bit of shits and giggles thing tbh, but as time (and the lock down) went on I grew (pun) into it. My next door neighbour gave me some great tips and a few plants he had seeded indoors earlier in the year.

I started with some old 2 x 10's I had stashed under the back deck and built a 4' x 10' wide box in front of and below (but not beneath) our patio deck. I put cardboard across the bottom and spread 2 bags of raked leaves and 1 bag of old grass clippings on top of that. I then bought 10 bags of top soil and spread that out too.

I then planted over a week or two, 4 Beefsteak Tomato, 2 Cherry Tomato, 3 Bell Pepper, 2 Hot Pepper, 3 Green Beans, all pre-grown. With seeds I did 2 Cucumber, 3 Pea Pod seeds. 4 Lettuce, Radish, Spring Onions, and Beetroot.

It wasn't long (May) before I (actually Phil the neighbour) noticed a few issues with the planting scheme. He pointed out 1) soil not deep enough - the 10 bags had sunk quite a bit, 2) plants too close together, & 3) back to front. ie, tall plants in front of small growing ones etc. Bollox,.... on to plan B.

Plan b was almost a total revamp. 30 more bags of soil, and a middle 2" x 10" x 4' cross beam < this turned out to be quite handy later. I then made the risky move of replanting the garden

I had drawn out a battle plan so after I determined the order of attack I would lift an area about 2' square, put those plants to one side, add soil, scoop and water then move in the replacement. It took me all day to rearrange the necessary items adding about 16 bags of soil in the process. I watered the garden thoroughly and left it for a day or two. I then spread the remaining 4 bags in between the tomato plants and re-seeded the Spring Onions and Radish.

The result wasn't too bad I lost 2 lettuce, 2 Pea pods and a Cucumber but the rest perked up so I saluted their undying efforts and told them to carry on growing. And grow they did.

May/June was spent looking and watering, and watering, and watering. In between I started to add a few strings nailed and tied to the top patio deck then either nailed/tied to a side plank or tied to some 2' bbq stakes pushed down into the soil. I used these to support the tall plants and hopefully prevent them snapping or tipping over in the sometimes stormy weather we get by the lake. The middle crossbeam was a handy step btw.

It was July before things started to happen the tomatoes, cucumber, lettuce and radish rocketed upwards. We had our 1st salad with our own lettuce and a radish. The lone survivor of the 3rd Pea Pod battalion lived up to it's name and gave us a massive haul of 3 fat pods and shriveled into oblivion.
View attachment 504018
Early August saw the 22 SOS (Spring Onion Seeds) disappear up their own Arrse and the cucumber grew an extra leg. The tomato plants by now were humongous and required more support strings - but no Toms yet. The beetroot were ready to harvest as were the green beans, cukes, radish, lettuce, and peppers. A decent harvest tbh.
View attachment 504021
Late August/September saw the biggest growth with everything popping up. We had our 1st Beefsteak & Cherry Toms and continue to enjoy everything else. We have made awesome Salads, Salsa Sauce, Pickled Beets, and Bacon & Tomato butties.
View attachment 504022

Mistakes & Lessons learned..
Obviously the 1st planting and lack of soil but more than that was the lack of plant knowledge. I simply had no idea just how big the tomato plants would be. Same for the Cucumber plant it spread everywhere overtaking the smaller plants and required plenty of pruning. Beetroot grow big, the Bell Peppers are big, Who knew you can peel off the bottom lettuce leaves and let new ones grow. The pea pods and Spring Onions should have been started indoors and more of them.

Despite the setbacks the wife and I really enjoyed setting up and taking care of the garden, it did become a bigger project than I first imagined but in these strange times it was a perfect time waster (so to speak) with great benefits. The smile on the wife's face as she handed out veggie goodies to every Joe & Jenny Blow that stopped by could have been smaller but that's how she is.

If you are still here: Thanks for leeting me ramble on.

Season 2 of the Cheap Gardener will begin next Spring.
So much enjoyment can be gained from a bit of veggie gardening .... Enjoy you're harvest :)
 
I started a Covid garden back at the end of March, it was a bit of shits and giggles thing tbh, but as time (and the lock down) went on I grew (pun) into it. My next door neighbour gave me some great tips and a few plants he had seeded indoors earlier in the year.

I started with some old 2 x 10's I had stashed under the back deck and built a 4' x 10' wide box in front of and below (but not beneath) our patio deck. I put cardboard across the bottom and spread 2 bags of raked leaves and 1 bag of old grass clippings on top of that. I then bought 10 bags of top soil and spread that out too.

I then planted over a week or two, 4 Beefsteak Tomato, 2 Cherry Tomato, 3 Bell Pepper, 2 Hot Pepper, 3 Green Beans, all pre-grown. With seeds I did 2 Cucumber, 3 Pea Pod seeds. 4 Lettuce, Radish, Spring Onions, and Beetroot.

It wasn't long (May) before I (actually Phil the neighbour) noticed a few issues with the planting scheme. He pointed out 1) soil not deep enough - the 10 bags had sunk quite a bit, 2) plants too close together, & 3) back to front. ie, tall plants in front of small growing ones etc. Bollox,.... on to plan B.

Plan b was almost a total revamp. 30 more bags of soil, and a middle 2" x 10" x 4' cross beam < this turned out to be quite handy later. I then made the risky move of replanting the garden

I had drawn out a battle plan so after I determined the order of attack I would lift an area about 2' square, put those plants to one side, add soil, scoop and water then move in the replacement. It took me all day to rearrange the necessary items adding about 16 bags of soil in the process. I watered the garden thoroughly and left it for a day or two. I then spread the remaining 4 bags in between the tomato plants and re-seeded the Spring Onions and Radish.

The result wasn't too bad I lost 2 lettuce, 2 Pea pods and a Cucumber but the rest perked up so I saluted their undying efforts and told them to carry on growing. And grow they did.

May/June was spent looking and watering, and watering, and watering. In between I started to add a few strings nailed and tied to the top patio deck then either nailed/tied to a side plank or tied to some 2' bbq stakes pushed down into the soil. I used these to support the tall plants and hopefully prevent them snapping or tipping over in the sometimes stormy weather we get by the lake. The middle crossbeam was a handy step btw.

It was July before things started to happen the tomatoes, cucumber, lettuce and radish rocketed upwards. We had our 1st salad with our own lettuce and a radish. The lone survivor of the 3rd Pea Pod battalion lived up to it's name and gave us a massive haul of 3 fat pods and shriveled into oblivion.
View attachment 504018
Early August saw the 22 SOS (Spring Onion Seeds) disappear up their own Arrse and the cucumber grew an extra leg. The tomato plants by now were humongous and required more support strings - but no Toms yet. The beetroot were ready to harvest as were the green beans, cukes, radish, lettuce, and peppers. A decent harvest tbh.
View attachment 504021
Late August/September saw the biggest growth with everything popping up. We had our 1st Beefsteak & Cherry Toms and continue to enjoy everything else. We have made awesome Salads, Salsa Sauce, Pickled Beets, and Bacon & Tomato butties.
View attachment 504022

Mistakes & Lessons learned..
Obviously the 1st planting and lack of soil but more than that was the lack of plant knowledge. I simply had no idea just how big the tomato plants would be. Same for the Cucumber plant it spread everywhere overtaking the smaller plants and required plenty of pruning. Beetroot grow big, the Bell Peppers are big, Who knew you can peel off the bottom lettuce leaves and let new ones grow. The pea pods and Spring Onions should have been started indoors and more of them.

Despite the setbacks the wife and I really enjoyed setting up and taking care of the garden, it did become a bigger project than I first imagined but in these strange times it was a perfect time waster (so to speak) with great benefits. The smile on the wife's face as she handed out veggie goodies to every Joe & Jenny Blow that stopped by could have been smaller but that's how she is.

If you are still here: Thanks for leeting me ramble on.

Season 2 of the Cheap Gardener will begin next Spring.

Very nice mate! There's nothing can beat your own home grown stuff. My wife is the green fingered one in the family, she's never happier than when she's out there.

Our growing season is pretty short up here in the mountains so she employs the use of her greenhouse to get a decent start. You may know this already but give your soil some nutrients, with her garden I usually put some down after everything is out of the ground and again at the beginning of Spring.

You'll see a difference in growth and size from the previous year. Again mate, nice one and happy eating.

Do you can any of it?
 

Londo

LE
Very nice mate! There's nothing can beat your own home grown stuff. My wife is the green fingered one in the family, she's never happier than when she's out there.

Our growing season is pretty short up here in the mountains so she employs the use of her greenhouse to get a decent start. You may know this already but give your soil some nutrients, with her garden I usually put some down after everything is out of the ground and again at the beginning of Spring.

You'll see a difference in growth and size from the previous year. Again mate, nice one and happy eating.

Do you can any of it?
Freezing is good too , we freeze runner beans . Normally have enough to last 10/11 months .
Tomatoes Handy for soups over winter months
Sweetcorn . Taken off the cobs , for soups and stews .
Leeks . Same as above .
 
Very nice mate! There's nothing can beat your own home grown stuff. My wife is the green fingered one in the family, she's never happier than when she's out there.

Our growing season is pretty short up here in the mountains so she employs the use of her greenhouse to get a decent start. You may know this already but give your soil some nutrients, with her garden I usually put some down after everything is out of the ground and again at the beginning of Spring.

You'll see a difference in growth and size from the previous year. Again mate, nice one and happy eating.

Do you can any of it?
Thanks Sam, we don't have much of a grow season either tbh, the next week or two will be the end of it.

I added nutrients at the beginning of the planting and bits and bobs throughout, I believe that digging and spreading of the two bottom leaf & grass layers helped as well. I will do that in the fall again before the snow comes.

As for canning I didn't give it a thought really, basically we were eating or giving away what we reaped, next year maybe.

Steve
 
Freezing is good too , we freeze runner beans . Normally have enough to last 10/11 months .
Tomatoes Handy for soups over winter months
Sweetcorn . Taken off the cobs , for soups and stews .
Leeks . Same as above .
What do you for the Tomatoes, do you freeze them in jars or how?
 

Londo

LE
What do you for the Tomatoes, do you freeze them in jars or how?
Just throw them in a freezer bag and remove when needed . Only good for soups after freezing as they do turn to mush when defrosted but the taste is still there .
 
For some weird reason the cucumber plant gave up quite a few Cukes but then started to rot pretty quickly, the same happened to the neighbours plants too, and he had 8 plants. He had read that an invasion of white moth was the culprit laying thousands of eggs on the leaves then the tiny gits ate the leaves after hatching < hatching??

A few more lessons.
I bought a cheap $ store metal trowel which broke on the replanting day after 2 diggings. I then buggered off and bought a $13 trowel which broke on the replanting day after about 20 digs. The $21 metal trowel is still good. That lesson cost $35 - don't buy cheap stuff.

What did come in handy were 4 x 3'6" tall bamboo trellises I picked up from the $ store that I used for propping up the tomato branches. The circular metal ring trellises were useless as they soon collapsed under the weight.

I'm also glad I used a cut up plastic ice cream carton to mark what the plants were, it's easy to forget what the seedlings or pre-grown plantings actually are.
 

Londo

LE
For some weird reason the cucumber plant gave up quite a few Cukes but then started to rot pretty quickly, the same happened to the neighbours plants too, and he had 8 plants. He had read that an invasion of white moth was the culprit laying thousands of eggs on the leaves then the tiny gits ate the leaves after hatching < hatching??

A few more lessons.
I bought a cheap $ store metal trowel which broke on the replanting day after 2 diggings. I then buggered off and bought a $13 trowel which broke on the replanting day after about 20 digs. The $21 metal trowel is still good. That lesson cost $35 - don't buy cheap stuff.

What did come in handy were 4 x 3'6" tall bamboo trellises I picked up from the $ store that I used for propping up the tomato branches. The circular metal ring trellises were useless as they soon collapsed under the weight.

I'm also glad I used a cut up plastic ice cream carton to mark what the plants were, it's easy to forget what the seedlings or pre-grown plantings actually are.
Wondered why my cucumbers didn't do well this year
Three plants and just one cue from each of them instead of the normal half dozen or so .
 
For some weird reason the cucumber plant gave up quite a few Cukes but then started to rot pretty quickly, the same happened to the neighbours plants too, and he had 8 plants. He had read that an invasion of white moth was the culprit laying thousands of eggs on the leaves then the tiny gits ate the leaves after hatching < hatching??

A few more lessons.
I bought a cheap $ store metal trowel which broke on the replanting day after 2 diggings. I then buggered off and bought a $13 trowel which broke on the replanting day after about 20 digs. The $21 metal trowel is still good. That lesson cost $35 - don't buy cheap stuff.

What did come in handy were 4 x 3'6" tall bamboo trellises I picked up from the $ store that I used for propping up the tomato branches. The circular metal ring trellises were useless as they soon collapsed under the weight.

I'm also glad I used a cut up plastic ice cream carton to mark what the plants were, it's easy to forget what the seedlings or pre-grown plantings actually are.

My most successful improvised tomato plant support - by far - was some galvanised wire mesh. Fairly substantial guage wire and approx 10cm centres.
I cut it and bent it to form a circle about 80cm dia. and drove a single stake into the ground to steady it.
It is loaded with toms and can easily support mesh to keep birds off.
 

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