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Gardening Forum?

Goosegogs are fab. I will be putting a bush or 3 into my fruit bed. Some for jam, some for crumple, some for scoffing raw.


Edited to add 'crumble'. Bloody spellchecker!!!!
Crumpled crumble eh?

They are vicious bastards so I am trying to espalier mine on the fence to make harvesting easier but the damn things have a mind of their own and they evidently hate me.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Crumpled crumble eh?

They are vicious bastards so I am trying to espalier mine on the fence to make harvesting easier but the damn things have a mind of their own and they evidently hate me.
Prune them hard. That'll learn 'em.
 
I grow a fair few tomato plants so wouldn't want it spreading to them .
‘er indoors is having a bash at tomatoes and blueberries - the birds have scoffed the b/berries but the toms are looking good and plentiful if a little small right now.

Shame about the b/berries as I eat bought ones every day with my wheaties


Prune them hard. That'll learn 'em.
Done end of last season and again later this year.
 
I have learnt that my next project is a pergola complete with a wisteria. It is a sunny location and sheltered, so far, so good. Has anyone any experience of growing wisteria?

Managed - it is beautiful.
My house in Dorset has a load on the south side , it blossoms twice in a season , people walk past to the beach and I often overhear comments admiring it.
There is much happiness in that alone.

Unmanaged - it is a bastard.
It grows under your gutters , around your gutters, into and downwards through your gutters, pushes downpipes of wall etc etc

... and all in a most charming and quaint manner.

Caveat emptor !
 

giatttt

Old-Salt
Managed - it is beautiful.
My house in Dorset has a load on the south side , it blossoms twice in a season , people walk past to the beach and I often overhear comments admiring it.
There is much happiness in that alone.

Unmanaged - it is a bastard.
It grows under your gutters , around your gutters, into and downwards through your gutters, pushes downpipes of wall etc etc

... and all in a most charming and quaint manner.

Caveat emptor !
Any tips on pruning, I've read a variety of different opinions?
 

Londo

LE
‘er indoors is having a bash at tomatoes and blueberries - the birds have scoffed the b/berries but the toms are looking good and plentiful if a little small right now.

Shame about the b/berries as I eat bought ones every day with my wheaties



Done end of last season and again later this year.
I have three blueberry bushes . One stopped producing after several very good years , not one blossom on it this spring . So think it's about to pop it's clogs .
The other two although fenced and netted off , the chickens somehow found their way in to and scoffed every last blueberry . I didn't get one :confused:

Tomatoes I have twelve nice plants of three different varieties all producing well and have been eating for the past week or so .
If there are too many to eat they are just put into plastic bags and into the freezer for the wife to make soup out of during the winter .
 
Any tips on pruning, I've read a variety of different opinions?

Cut out everything dead.
If - in the process - you cut a few things that looked dead but weren't - don't worry, its just collateral damage and it will come back at you again.

Cut some more.

Don't feed it - it will only come at you again.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
‘er indoors is having a bash at tomatoes and blueberries - the birds have scoffed the b/berries but the toms are looking good and plentiful if a little small right now.

Shame about the b/berries as I eat bought ones every day with my wheaties



Done end of last season and again later this year.
I made covers for the blueberries out of some net curtains... just a case of remembering to open and close them when you're in the garden so the sun can get on them.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Cut out everything dead.
If - in the process - you cut a few things that looked dead but weren't - don't worry, its just collateral damage and it will come back at you again.

Cut some more.

Don't feed it - it will only come at you again.
Aim for an open cup shape. The light and air can get at the fruit better, discouraging mildew etc.
 
Tried in three different gardens. Utter failure every time. Love wisteria, but doomed never to grow it successfully, so can't help.
They can take a few years to grow sufficiently to flower . . . . . . . . . . . but saying that my son planted one about 2ft tall in his girlfriends garden in the spring and it had some flowering bracts this year.
 
Screenshot_20200819-165637_WhatsApp.jpg


Found a picture of it.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Evening plant botherers.

I noticed a few days ago, that my prized ornamental yew (taxus baccata fastigiata) has gone all brown on one side!

Could this be just the result of the recent heatwave, or is it going into a decline? The tree is about 15 years old now and it's not happend before.

In other news, there's a bumper crop of berries on the holly tree already.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Evening plant botherers.

I noticed a few days ago, that my prized ornamental yew (taxus baccata fastigiata) has gone all brown on one side!

Could this be just the result of the recent heatwave, or is it going into a decline? The tree is about 15 years old now and it's not happend before.

In other news, there's a bumper crop of berries on the holly tree already.
Drought can cause this.

I inherited a yew in my wilderness garden. It was all brown and horrid. Himself was convinced it was dying.

Watering nightly, feeding with seaweed, and a good hard prune in April have recovered it amazingly.

It's got new growth sprouting everywhere, which will eventually hide the brown.
I will take another 4 feet off the top next April, and trim out any remaining brown, which should do the trick nicely.

So long as it doesn't dry out again. Unlikely now it's surrounded by garden.

Pic tomorrow when it's light, if it will help.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Here you go.
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Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
In April I will take it down to level with next door's fence and make it a better shape at the sides. That should get rid of most of the brown, and encourage all that new green to grow more. Feeding weekly and keeping watered should do the trick.
 

philc

LE
We have tried them all, and have ended up buying Felco secateurs, not cheap but well made and ergonomically well designed. Last for years if you don’t drop them in a bonfire or bury them somewhere. Can be dismantled for servicing and blade sharpening.

I have three pairs, Felco are used in most Italian & French vineyards, I used mine for pruning the Hazelnut trees, very good and fit the hand nicely.

These are the dogs if you have a bit of work to do.

 
I have three pairs, Felco are used in most Italian & French vineyards, I used mine for pruning the Hazelnut trees, very good and fit the hand nicely.

These are the dogs if you have a bit of work to do.

I also have 3 pairs only one of which we know their whereabouts, other two pairs in a long term durability trial somewhere in the garden, will let you know how they fare if we ever find them
 

TAFKA

Old-Salt
So long as you don't put them into soil that's grown potatoes, you should avoid blight, but the Irish learned that lesson the hard way in the 19th Century ;-)

I grew spuds because I wanted to break up the soil in my new raised bed, and they do taste nicer than shop bought, but like you can't grow many. Might try odd varieties next year, Pink Fir Apple or purple ones. My purple carrots have been nice this year.

Try Mayan Gold* for roasting, Anya for boiled/salad and Salad Blues** for novelty.

*Don't boil them as they will turn into mush.

**More purple than blue, the colour goes right through the spud and doesn't fade completely when cooked. Despite the name they're not salad potatoes and are better steamed than boiled but make an interesting coloured mash.

We always grow spuds in bags now as it's much easier to plant and harvest, you know which variety you're getting, no chance of forking any and you can get every last one which means you won't be finding potato plants sprouting up where you haven't planted any for years. As Londo mentioned, spuds are dead cheap to buy so it's only worth growing varieties that you can't buy or are difficult to find. I've only ever heard of Mayan Golds being sold in M&S and I think Anyas are exclusive to Sainsbury's.
 
In April I will take it down to level with next door's fence and make it a better shape at the sides. That should get rid of most of the brown, and encourage all that new green to grow more. Feeding weekly and keeping watered should do the trick.
[Lot of trees affected this year...beech, yew and larch. Brown caused by a very late frost and high winds. All will recover in time.]
 
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