Gardening Forum?

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Stuff it and bake it.
Make it into wine ...

Edit to add - I found my parents' recipe for marrow wine this week. I can post if you are interested.
A few years ago I would have said yes but I accidentally gave up drinking, thank you any way.
 
I have only just jumped into this Thread so apologies if this question has already been asked and dealt with.

I have been growing stuff for the last 3 months, some failures, lots of success thanks to YouTube- not me. Quantities all wrong - eg I have about 20x more lettuce than I can give away.

The question.
I 'expected' far more attrition from birds and insects and it has been minimal.
I 'inherited' raspberries, blackcurrents, gooseberries ( red and green ) - all untended for 5+ years and buried in a jungle of blackberry thorns and nettles.
After a lot of work it all looks good now - crazy good - dripping in fruit we are taking every morning - and no pests.

What is(n't) going on ?
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
What is(n't) going on ?

I don't know, but don't knock it!

Seriously, I haven't seen greenfly (not him!)/blackfly for years. I have however, seen many more ladybirds and their larvae which are voracious predators of the aforementioned, so maybe some of the pests are in a temporary decline.
 
maybe some of the pests are in a temporary decline.
I noticed that. Am trying to grow grapes . Lots of Greenfly on at the start of the season. Washed them off with water and these insects have not re appeared. I am just enjoying it while it lasts. Less slug damage to Strawberries as well.

Strange.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer

Londo

LE
I have only just jumped into this Thread so apologies if this question has already been asked and dealt with.

I have been growing stuff for the last 3 months, some failures, lots of success thanks to YouTube- not me. Quantities all wrong - eg I have about 20x more lettuce than I can give away.

The question.
I 'expected' far more attrition from birds and insects and it has been minimal.
I 'inherited' raspberries, blackcurrents, gooseberries ( red and green ) - all untended for 5+ years and buried in a jungle of blackberry thorns and nettles.
After a lot of work it all looks good now - crazy good - dripping in fruit we are taking every morning - and no pests.

What is(n't) going on ?
No idea but count you're blessings . My lettuces were decimated by sparrows this year , destroyed every last one . Chewed down a fair few of my pea plants as well .
 
I don't know, but don't knock it!

Seriously, I haven't seen greenfly (not him!)/blackfly for years. I have however, seen many more ladybirds and their larvae which are voracious predators of the aforementioned, so maybe some of the pests are in a temporary decline.
Just for a bit of fun I grow a few chili peppers. This year I'm inundated with greenfly, first time ever. Bought some spray which is useless.

After a bit more looking into it I've ordered some diatomaceous earth. Seems promising according to Wiki
 
Just for a bit of fun I grow a few chili peppers. This year I'm inundated with greenfly, first time ever. Bought some spray which is useless.

After a bit more looking into it I've ordered some diatomaceous earth. Seems promising according to Wiki
my peppers were not growing too well , so over the last couple of days I knocked up this self watering system , been on it for a couple of hours and starting to look healthier already
chillis.jpg

showed my son it , there seemed to be a bit of unexpected interest in it , he thinks I am a bit naive , but I know what he wants to grow
 
my peppers were not growing too well , so over the last couple of days I knocked up this self watering system , been on it for a couple of hours and starting to look healthier already
View attachment 489729
showed my son it , there seemed to be a bit of unexpected interest in it , he thinks I am a bit naive , but I know what he wants to grow
Watering seems to be a strange thing with chilis, Letting them wilt before watering stresses the plant and causes hotter peppers.

My Jalapenos are about 24" , Cayennes 18" and Jock Bonnets anything up to 10".

Put up some phots tomorrow.
 

Mrsheeny

War Hero
Last year I didn't bother putting copper tape round the raised beds, slugs ate chunks out of my beetroot and decimated my cabbage (ooh matron). This year I've used that copper tape stuff and only when slugs can get over somehow via overgrown grass or something they've stayed away.

Black fly have totally covered the stems of my Dahlias, being harvested by the Ants beneath it.

For anyone growing veg, for the past few years I've bought heirloom seeds from the Real Seed company, decent stuff.
 
Anyone grown cherry trees from the discarded cherry pips?

Whats the secret?
I have a 4 m tall cherry tree l grew from a pit, took a few try’s but managed. Can’t remember where l read it as it’s been years, but l put the pit in a sandwich bag filled with vermiculite and just enough water to moisten it. After that l left it in the refrigerator for 3 months. Planted a few in pots and they grew.
 

XPara Mugg

War Hero
Anyone grown cherry trees from the discarded cherry pips?

Whats the secret?
Slight Fred Riff....

A few years back (1990s) I was looking at buying bits of woodland around Essex, so I spent a few days driving about having some pleasant walks in random spots. One was (roughly remembered) described in the details as 'An attractive holding, well fenced, with good access, established rides and defined coupes. It comprises 24 acres of mixed woodland: mostly sweet chestnut, formerly managed as coppice, with hornbeam standards and a belt of mature, self seeded, mixed cherry varieties along the southern boundary.' I drove there and parked up by the small shop opposite the entrance. A typical, of the time, country village shop, a bungalow with a bit on the front selling fruit and veg. Definitely looked like it had been there for years. True enough, it was a pleasant walk and I reached the Southern boundary amongst the cherries, with a gentle slope in front of me looking over very attractive, hedgerowed farmland. Very nice I thought, worth the walk. A bit of good timber and 40/50 year old cherry wood sells well to the turning enthusiasts.

A few days later I'm at the club where our old and bold (a fine assortment of WW2 airborne sorts) met up each week between meetings, having a beer. In the general chat, I spoke of the wood I'd surveyed that week, where it was and how it was nice, although I hadn't mentioned the tree species. "I remember there," spake one of the group, "I lived in the village before the war. Used to take our girls into that wood, courting. We used to drop into the shop opposite then go for a "walk" (the quotation marks were clearly audible). Lovely days, (pause).... sitting looking out over The Hanningfields, (pause).... a pretty girl, a bottle of pop and bag of cherries (significant pause of reverie)...... lovely." Good old boys and everyone was young once.

It might not have been only the cherries that were 'seeded' there. ;)


You don't have to worry too much about cherries. In my experience, enough seeds in sandy loam and they'll come up like weeds.


drift/
 
I have been trying to diversify what we produce at the farm in the province by growing trees from seeds (obviously a long term project), namely Avocado, Papaya, Lemon, Orange, Tangerine, and another crack at Apple (It will be a miracle if that succeeds here in the tropics).

Avocado is the easiest,once I dispensed with the toothpick and glass of water nonsense. Three months doing nothing on the windowsill until I stuffed both into big outdoor pots with a good dollop of water buffalo doo dahs. Hey presto, two weeks later both were shooting. One is now up at the farm but Covid intervened and the second is likely to break the pot before we can move it there.

Lemons are pretty easy so long as you treat the seeds like a litter of puppies and chose the biggest and best formed seeds (same story with Orange, Tangerine, and Apple). Clean off the pulp so they don't attract ants and stick them in potting compost without delay.

Orange and Tangerine require soaking in a glass of water overnight before planting.

Apple has to be kept dry and popped in a small container in the fridge for six weeks t trick them into thinking it is a European winter. They shoot within ten days after potting.

Papaya have about a hundred seeds per piece of fruit and impossible to tell if the seeds are male, female, or hermaphrodite. That is only known when the plant produces blossom, long stem = Male, short stem = Female, mix of both long and short = hermaphrodite.
Wash the seeds to deny ants a meal and scatter them on the ground before covering in a thing layer of soil and that water buffalo's number 2's.

Too much sun or too much rain tend to do them in early unless you mother them up to the time they are 6" tall and start to get a bit hardier.

Vaseline, generously applied to the lower stems, is a must to stop bugs climbing those stems and eating the leaves.

Aphids are b*****s but scattering ordinary flour around the seedlings and plants keeps them away

I did plant all the seeds, no matter size and shape, from the fruit. I had about a dozen seedlings from each but those were whittled down by Darwin to one Apple, one Orange, one Tangerine, six Lemon, two Avocado, and just one Papaya (the seeds of the other Papaya rotted in the ground).

The Avocado we have here is doing the best, 4' tall and the stem is already turning to wood. (Its brother got a bit gnawed on by a neighbours goat up at the farm.... funny how their goats 'escape' when they have grazed out their own land).

The six Lemon are a foot high.
The Apple is 6" tall.
The Papaya is 4" tall
The Orange and Tangerine are still only 2" tall.

Farm news, our entire banana crop was stolen off the trees, a hundred and twelve bunches with perhaps sixty bananas per bunch. however, quarantine means we could not harvest them, let along take them to town for sale so I would hope they added to someones otherwise rice heavy diet.

No photos, alas, Arrse is averse to seedling porn.
Update.

Update:

I managed to kill the thriving avocado. They grow back after fire and even after being munched on by goats and cows, but touching their roots is like the avocado cyanide pill. It got too big for the pot, which I cannot currently replace, so I transferred it with as much care as possible to a rice sack full of its fave slightly acid soil, something I should have done instead of the pot, but it was dead within a week.

On the soil side, at this end of the island, it is quite alkaline. Drop some vinegar on a trowels worth and it fizzes like a good'un. I am not paying for Sulphur at the prices charged here so unwashed coffee grounds and leaf compost are doing the job slowly.
My neighbour thought he was doing me a favour by tipping out his barbeque ashes on my lemon plants. Citrus fruit hates alkaline so they are looking very sorry for themselves.
Different story at the farm, which sits on a hill created by an ancient and submerged volcano in the Tanon Straits as anything grows there. Hopefully the volcano stays dead, though.
 
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Last year I didn't bother putting copper tape round the raised beds, slugs ate chunks out of my beetroot and decimated my cabbage (ooh matron). This year I've used that copper tape stuff and only when slugs can get over somehow via overgrown grass or something they've stayed away.

Black fly have totally covered the stems of my Dahlias, being harvested by the Ants beneath it.

For anyone growing veg, for the past few years I've bought heirloom seeds from the Real Seed company, decent stuff.
Dried, broken egg shells (not too fine) sprinkled around the plots edge, are the punji sticks that slugs and snails hate.

Ordinary flour, sprinkled around the plants is pepper spray to aphids

A little Garlic oil of the stems upsets black fly (if you live in places tropical, snakes don't like the smell of garlic either. We plant lots around the house)
 

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