Gardening Forum?

Does chicken poo work as a fertiliser? I was under the impression it needed to decompose a while but I'm not 100%.
Look out for the pellets in bags, there are some about usually from Pound Shop type places. It's supposed to have plenty of NPK, and gardeners like it in pellets scattered on the garden. Understanding Fertilizer Numbers: N-P-K: Gardening.

Careful, when you add the chicken **** pellets to water, you've basically got a can of chicken ****. We're strict organic so we wouldn't use it, but each to their own.
Chicken manure/RHS Gardening
 
Does chicken poo work as a fertiliser? I was under the impression it needed to decompose a while but I'm not 100%.
Chicken manure is great fertilizer, I use it annually as I have access to tons of it. The main drawback is that it is extremely high in nitrogen so you can’t put it on and plant the next day or it will burn your plantings. I generally work it in the fall so it can sit and mellow out over winter. I have used it in liquid form, mixed with straw, and in its natural state which is the form I find the best.
 
Seaweed

If you live on or near the coast, fresh seaweed can be dug into the soil like manure. It doesn't need to rot and it's a bit smelly, and also good stuff for mulching. After washing it off thoroughly, you can use it straightaway. It's got carbs and nutrients, nitrogen and potassium.

People go down to beach and collect seaweed in barrows. Hopefully they don't take too much. It's often better than manure or commercial fertilizer products, because seaweed has extra trace elements and you can get it in dried and processed forms, in fact in various forms.

Also chop it up, or rot it down for a few months in a barrel. Like most composts, you can drain the liquid off rotted seaweed and use it as liquid seaweed fertiliser. Chop seaweed, add tap water and cook it up, then store in a barrel for three months.

Seaweed products/RHS Gardening
 
Just seen a couple of these-



on the soil in the garden,

google says "giant elephant hawk moth caterpillar"

never seen them before
 
Thank you everybody.

I have a few chickens so will turn the poop in and let it settle until after Xmas perhaps.

Ref. The seaweed I've used it before and it absolutely stinks so I'll be avoiding that haha. Results were excellent though
 
Has anybody tried to plant up a living wall? Did you use ferns and what type?
Not seen this before, but well mentioned. A few searches turned up some interesting stuff, so a living (green) wall or vertical garden could be a good project. It seems you can use hanging planting bags and wall pots (vertical planters) and shelves. The ideal wall plants appear to be various types and colours, small 'plugging' plants that 'plug' gaps in your living wall. The Septics seem to be doing it.

There are Youtube vids but they're typically bonk with shite music. Looks like you can plant up interior and exterior living walls, using 'wall pots'; How to create a living wall.

Never seen this before.
 
Not seen this before, but well mentioned. A few searches turned up some interesting stuff, so a living (green) wall or vertical garden could be a good project. It seems you can use hanging planting bags and wall pots (vertical planters) and shelves. The ideal wall plants appear to be various types and colours, small 'plugging' plants that 'plug' gaps in your living wall. The Septics seem to be doing it.

There are Youtube vids but they're typically bonk with shite music. Looks like you can plant up interior and exterior living walls, using 'wall pots'; How to create a living wall.

Never seen this before.
There was a very interesting example on one of Monty Don’s programs the other day using a variety of ferns. It transformed a dark back passage (no pun) and I thought it might do well on a couple of our walls. Dobbies Garden Centres do a planting kit but it is not cheap.
 
There was a very interesting example on one of Monty Don’s programs the other day using a variety of ferns. It transformed a dark back passage (no pun) and I thought it might do well on a couple of our walls. Dobbies Garden Centres do a planting kit but it is not cheap.
Businesses will overcharge and profit from very simple concepts. Marketers will do their job and there will be super duper videos presented by strange people called Summer Rain, Barry Organic or Vertical Victor, but these things seem simple enough for DIY types.

Choose plants for the vertical garden/green wall, and you'll need an irrigation hose or watering system to keep them alive. There might be a tray of water at the top of the wall, feeding down through a hose. Use a sheet of plastic cut to size and covered with Felt, which makes a vertical pocket wall. Fix to your wall or chosen space . Mark out and slit 10cm (or whatever) length pockets in the Felt. Stick your plants in the pockets and staple the sides. Youtube can be useful sometimes ;)
 
You'll never stop butterflies laying eggs, that veg patch is like a fcuking rolling buffet for them suckers. Try putting cardboard round the bottom of all your plants, or try pathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (PNSC), it's a bit of a mouthful but it's 'safe' mixed with water and sprayed onto leaves. Parasitic Nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae (Garden Size, 10 million) - GrowOrganic.com

You can buy PNSC easily in UK and order it online. It's parasitic so the greedy little sods should ingest it and die. If you spray it during your evening slug killing walkabout, you might get better results. We chuck all our slugs from the garden traps, into the sealed compost bins; they'll stuff their ugly mugs and travel up and down the bins making compost, then we poison them once a month with organic Nemaslug Killer, which doesn't kill the vital bacteria.
Cheers I'll give it a go next year.
Netting didn't prevent all the bloody things getting inside so they just ended up protected from the birds and as we have a cat who likes bringing birds in (very gently so I have the fun of rescuing the terrified things) word seems to have got round the feathery population and our brassicas had a perfect storm.
Compost bins are very full as a result and I've put a dint in the cabbage white population which seemed to be using our garden as a nursery.
 
Careful, when you add the chicken **** pellets to water, you've basically got a can of chicken ****. We're strict organic so we wouldn't use it, but each to their own.
Please explain why chicken **** isn't organic.
 
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Just seen a couple of these-



on the soil in the garden,

google says "giant elephant hawk moth caterpillar"

never seen them before
Elephant Hawk-moth
Fairly specific in what if feeds on, although in the end if it's on leaves it's eating some plant nearby. If you're into night spotting the adult is rather striking.
 
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Elephant Hawk-moth
Fairly specific in what if feeds on, although in the end if it's on leafs it easting some plant nearby. If you're into night spotting the adult is rather striking.
posted pic is from google, I saw two of them on soil & took a pic on the phone

there mean to be quite common, but I've never seen them or the adult moth before
 
Does chicken poo work as a fertiliser? I was under the impression it needed to decompose a while but I'm not 100%.
Further to this: some growers use non-animal manures, if they choose to, and especially for choosy customers. We all have choices and the freedom to experiment safely in the garden. Chicken manure is also thought to be lower in nutrients, and slower in release than is useful to some gardeners.
 

FrosteeMARIA

LE
Gallery Guru
Found this little critter stuck in a plant pot a while ago. After poking and prodding managed to squeeze him/her free. Then found out that it was actually a dangerous wee beastie!

"The caterpillar of the puss moth is generally green in colour with a dark looking spike protruding from one end and a colourful "face" on the other. When threatened the puss moth caterpillar is known to spray formic acid at its attacker to minimise the chance of it being eaten (it is the most dangerous caterpillar species in Britain)."
 

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Found this little critter stuck in a plant pot a while ago. After poking and prodding managed to squeeze him/her free. Then found out that it was actually a dangerous wee beastie!

"The caterpillar of the puss moth is generally green in colour with a dark looking spike protruding from one end and a colourful "face" on the other. When threatened the puss moth caterpillar is known to spray formic acid at its attacker to minimise the chance of it being eaten (it is the most dangerous caterpillar species in Britain)."
well it does appear to be wearing a hoodie?
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Thinking about posting in the "depression thread" but decided to post here.

Having had a particularly rough few weeks, and on my knees with tiredness due to not sleeping, I was dragged by the OH round to his mate's shop. I retired to the garden with the dog, feeling wretched, the mate offered me a cup of tea which was gratefully received, and after the shop shut the workshop guys came out and sat around talking about motorbikes (which is fine by me, but I don't know enough to add to the conversation).

Out of the blue, I said "any of you guys like chillies?" Young Jim piped up, telling me about various capsicums, how they have a "placenta", the difference between bell peppers and chillies and why some are hot and others aren't.

I felt an instant lift in my mood - I'd made a connection with someone through plants!

Sorry for the slightly odd post, but it's been really good to read through this thread again and take in stuff I might have missed before.

Thanks lads and lasses. x
 
just the fence to sort out , looking nice should be able to wash it off tomorrow when the grout and pointing has dried View attachment 341883
well next doors cat likes sitting on the patio in the sun , and pissing in the new planter, little shit

now, just that fence to sort out when we get back from Vegas

IMG_20180820_193311.jpg
 
Apple trees.......

Sometime from now, till winter, Lidl will be selling apple trees.

They're columnar, so will fit into a small garden if pruned.

Make sure you buy compatible trees, which blossom at the same time, for fertilisation.

Forget the conifers, they give privacy when you want it, lovely blossom in the spring, apples in the autumn.

I've never seen such prolific fruit.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
It's pissing down with rain here, so I thought I'd check up the old "houseplants", as they've been enjoying the hot weather outside.

2015, when I got them

cacti.jpg




Three years later:

PICT1403.JPG
 

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