Gardening Forum?

These are handy for a shed if you need a bit of low maintenance light.


The solar panel will also work as a trickle charge for other USB things like a phone. The light once charged lasts for a good 6 hours.
 
just the fence to sort out , looking nice should be able to wash it off tomorrow when the grout and pointing has dried
IMG_20180711_182316.jpg
 
These are handy for a shed if you need a bit of low maintenance light.


The solar panel will also work as a trickle charge for other USB things like a phone. The light once charged lasts for a good 6 hours.
Self contained solar panel arrays will give you enough wattage on LED lights to see what you're doing. Also PIR utility lights. With a bit of nouse and invention, you can also heat up water and radiators off the grid ;)
 
Anyone know a way to deter cats from crapping on the lawn? Apart from the trusty CZ.22 and other lethal methods, as banned by Mrs Ancient, (the spoil sport), what actually works?

Are you sure it's cats? They usually bury their poo in hidden corners as they like to take a crap in private, not out in the open. A fox is more likely to take a dump in the middle of a lawn. In any case, anything citrus will put them off. Lemon or orange peels, juice, etc. but you will have to reapply frequently. There are also cat scarers - a high pitched alarm type device, or a cardboard cut out style of a fake cat! Last resort, get your own cat!
 
Anyone know a simple method of removing caterpillars off brassicas, post infestation?
I lost my broccoli crop last year as the little bastards were rife inside in the heads so this year netted the crop.
Unfortunately a combination of wind and my cat, who shares my hate of cabbage whites, destroyed the net and the first caulis I pulled yesterday have the little buggers deep inside the heads.

I've a second crop that's better netted but I don't want the extra protein so how to remove them, water just seems to make them extrude slime and stick on?
 
What is it with the seventies/eighties generation , Daughter is up visiting this week and after admiring what we'd done , and how nice the garden was looking , when I showed her the plans I had drawn up for a hydroponic system to grow tomatoes beside the consevatory next year , she just winked and said " yeah! right Dad" ... if I mention hydroponics , both my kids think I am off on some "Breaking Bad" sort of journey

anyone on here actually grown toms using this method, were you successful?
 
While I'm a cat- lover, I know they can be a bloody nuisance.

Sometimes unwanted cats turn up to try to take over my tribe.

I've found the most effective deterrent, without cruelty, is to get a cheap catapult from the pound shops, then keep a tupperware container of fine sand, soaked in water close by.

A ball of wet sand, fired at them, does no harm, but the noise of all those loose grains, flying around them is very unpleasant to them.

They learn quickly to stay away, but there's no harm done to them.

HMMMMMM, this might be a good deterrent from those sodding cabbage- whites, I've tried a bug bat, but they're more evasive than the Red Baron.
 
Chaps,

Apologies for wading in mid-conversation but this seems to be the most relevant thread I've been able to find.

I'm starting a veg patch in the garden and I'm after a bit of advice as to the best way to go about it. I have a rectangle approx 4.7 X 3M to play with (maximum) with a 2m high fence on 2 sides, which I intend to put trellis on for plants that grow up them.

It's currently turf so what do I need to do to prepare the ground and what fruit/veg do people recommend? Any general tips/advice would also be appreciated!

Cheers
 
You're better off wandering around your estate to see what local gardeners are growing on your particular soil.

For example, my estate's thick clay, and it's taken years to lighten it up just a little.

Up against a fence, I'd recommend raspberries, they last for years and you get a really good crop for the area taken up.

As long as you like the veg, go for the stuff that's always expensive in the shops, eg ruby chard.

Caulis and sprouts have never done well for me, but leeks are usually good.
 
Anyone know a simple method of removing caterpillars off brassicas, post infestation?
I lost my broccoli crop last year as the little bastards were rife inside in the heads so this year netted the crop.
Unfortunately a combination of wind and my cat, who shares my hate of cabbage whites, destroyed the net and the first caulis I pulled yesterday have the little buggers deep inside the heads.

I've a second crop that's better netted but I don't want the extra protein so how to remove them, water just seems to make them extrude slime and stick on?
You'll never stop butterflies laying eggs, that veg patch is like a fcuking rolling buffet for them suckers. Try putting cardboard round the bottom of all your plants, or try pathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae (PNSC), it's a bit of a mouthful but it's 'safe' mixed with water and sprayed onto leaves. Parasitic Nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae (Garden Size, 10 million) - GrowOrganic.com

You can buy PNSC easily in UK and order it online. It's parasitic so the greedy little sods should ingest it and die. If you spray it during your evening slug killing walkabout, you might get better results. We chuck all our slugs from the garden traps, into the sealed compost bins; they'll stuff their ugly mugs and travel up and down the bins making compost, then we poison them once a month with organic Nemaslug Killer, which doesn't kill the vital bacteria.
 
Chaps,

Apologies for wading in mid-conversation but this seems to be the most relevant thread I've been able to find.

I'm starting a veg patch in the garden and I'm after a bit of advice as to the best way to go about it. I have a rectangle approx 4.7 X 3M to play with (maximum) with a 2m high fence on 2 sides, which I intend to put trellis on for plants that grow up them.

It's currently turf so what do I need to do to prepare the ground and what fruit/veg do people recommend? Any general tips/advice would also be appreciated!

Cheers
I generally use glyphosate late in the summer on the turf that needs to be gone and turn the sod over once it’s dead in mid sept. I work it over again in October and add compost or manure into the mix and let set til spring and it’s ready to go.
 
I'll de-turf an area and check the soil, it's a new estate so it's probably rubble and scrap haha. Raspberries will definitely be going in, I didn't think of them but will work well I think
 
On the subject of composting (nature's bonfire), the RHS once did a video on basic method. Too tired to write much after restoring and painting a big decking today, all I'd say is that the RHS advice to chuck weeds in seems a bit daft to me; I might use weed tops and bin the roots in the green bin, but I'd much rather chuck the entire weed in the green bin and feel safe.

If you get a lot of leafdrop then collect them and keep them separate, in big sacks or closed crates, and you should have leaf ash/leafmould for your growing medium after a year. It's a very good soil conditioner for mixing with old/used pot-growing soil (recycling) with added organic booster and water. They're good for vegetable pot growing, sowing carrots, beetroot etc.

You might like the Garden Organic videos, they're a bit "for dummies" and obvious but we learned something from them anyway:

 

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