Garage Floor?

Although it's called self-levelling, you need to help it with a long, straight edge, and have the mix at the right consistency. It works well, but maybe it would be a good idea to get your local handyman to help (y)

first I need to replace the roof on the workshop (currently it's a flat one from about 25 years ago with several layers of replacement roofing felt and a top layer of metal) and the garage door. Well it's the frame that needs doing but I may as well replace the metal up-and-over with a couple of normal doors as the up and over is at exactly the right height to cause serious head trauma
 
first I need to replace the roof on the workshop (currently it's a flat one from about 25 years ago with several layers of replacement roofing felt and a top layer of metal) and the garage door. Well it's the frame that needs doing but I may as well replace the metal up-and-over with a couple of normal doors as the up and over is at exactly the right height to cause serious head trauma
Have you thought about a roll-up door instead of up-and-over? No headroom issues as the roller only occupies space directly above the door.
 
Have you thought about a roll-up door instead of up-and-over? No headroom issues as the roller only occupies space directly above the door.
I had, I'm thinking of making wooden ones. Simple, quiet and inexpensive.
 
Check with local aircraft maintenance organisations and see what they use for hangar floors. Resists all kinds of nasty crap dropped on it and easy to keep clean.
I had a conversation with a sales representative about floor paints. He was pissed at the time and it was a long time ago, so I hope I recall it correctly.

We were using non-slip sheet flooring (Altro), it had an upstand around the perimeter and the edges were welded. I was looking at alternatives, his company (forget who) sold epoxy flooring. His recommendation was that to get a good key to the floor, it had to be wet grit-blasted to expose the aggregate. You also had to ensure that the moisture content of the sub-floor was below the recommended level; there was a method of testing this, which involved a hygrometer (humidity meter) in a bottomless box with a glass lid which was sealed to the sub-floor. There was a BS for that, ISTR, I had access to a computer library of technical publications. The sub-floor had to be dried out, there were no short cuts. Moisture trying to evaporate through an impervious sheet of flooring will blow the entire sheet off the floor, the vapour- pressure was small but over a large area, the forces were huge.

To get a non-slip floor. the wet epoxy was sprinkled with "silica sand"; his words as I recall. I thought all sand was silica, I never found out what the special stuff was. Epoxy could be like an ice-rink when wet, people would fall, we'd get sued.

The work was obviously done by specialists with the appropriate equipment. That may be why domestic garage floors only last 2 or 3 years; no/inadequate sub-floor vapour barrier, inadequate key to the sub-floor, moisture content too high, etc..

We never used epoxy floors, so I never saw this in use. The sheet flooring on that project was laid prematurely and the moisture lifted it in great blisters. It had to be re-laid.
 
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