Garage Floor?

Bad CO

Admin
Seduced by the thought of a beautiful floor in the one area of the property that is truly mine, I've been considering options to replace the very dusty concrete one that I currently have. Epoxy seems like a popular option but I've heard that they only last 2-3 years before need doing again.

Thoughts?
 
I did our garage floor with 'proper' floor paint.Lasted about three months before the peeling started. Seems it was a bad batch. A neighbour used resin three years ago.It gets a lot of abuse and it still looks good.
 
I've looked at sorting out my garage and workshop with better flooring. Epoxy resin (not the paint) is supposed to be long lasting, I've been told it will last for decades Concrete will outlast it.
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
I've seen a few tiled garage floors, should be quite straightforward
 
I've seen a few tiled garage floors, should be quite straightforward

I happen to have a ferkin' great stack of new floor tiles that were in the garage when we bought this house. I considered using them unfortunately, the floor is rather uneven. I may do tiles on the floor and walls in the workshop/brewery though
 

P.O.N.T.I

War Hero
I have the inside of my 6m x 5m workshop carpeted. Old blue lounge carpet, nearly the same size.
Don't use underlay and ensure you don't park anything damp on it as it will hold the damp
 

aardvark64

Old-Salt
Rubber stabling matting is good too - I have it around the edges where it doesn't catch the oil or swarf :)
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Daft question really but, what are you using your garage for?
 
Check with local aircraft maintenance organisations and see what they use for hangar floors. Resists all kinds of nasty crap dropped on it and easy to keep clean.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Seduced by the thought of a beautiful floor in the one area of the property that is truly mine, I've been considering options to replace the very dusty concrete one that I currently have. Epoxy seems like a popular option but I've heard that they only last 2-3 years before need doing again.

Thoughts?
If it's dusty, that needs stabilising first otherwise anything that goes on top will lift, crack or bubble. the finish depends on usage, at work most workshops are tiled, the grout is oil resistant. Some have epoxy finish but this shows marks easily as it doesnt appear to have an especially resilient surface, it does last well if the underlying surface is in good nick. There was one workshop that had a industrial version of lino installed as the base tiled floor was in shit state, they brushed a self-levelling screed over it first then put the lino down. That was about three years ago and it's painted with a polyurethane based floor paint every year, for a workshop it's doing OK.
 
Did mine with ECOTILE plastic tiles well over a decade back. Still looks top. No dust, no damp, warm underfoot, a mop over and it comes up nice.
You can often pick up lightly used or never used lots on fleabay for a very good price.

 
I recommissioned the living room carpet when it was stripped out a few years back and that makes up my garage floor. I have a double garage but have never used it for parking my cars, it's more a workshop/storage area/gym (cough... with dust covered equipment). Comfier on the knees when working on some projects and covers a multitude of sins with a slightly damaged concrete floor.
 
Seduced by the thought of a beautiful floor in the one area of the property that is truly mine, I've been considering options to replace the very dusty concrete one that I currently have. Epoxy seems like a popular option but I've heard that they only last 2-3 years before need doing again.

Thoughts?
Self levelling concrete followed by tiles / wooden flooring / or a professionally fitted heat sealed vinyl flooring *

* expensive but worth every penny.
 
I happen to have a ferkin' great stack of new floor tiles that were in the garage when we bought this house. I considered using them unfortunately, the floor is rather uneven. I may do tiles on the floor and walls in the workshop/brewery though
Float a screed, a self-levelling mix that will make your floor completely level ready for tiling.
Be careful of hard tiles, they are extremely slippery when wet.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
you can get interlocking plastic tiles that work well
I have used floor paint, but its a good idea to scour the floor first, the pressure wash it before painting
also when using epoxy 2 pack paint
make sure you have plenty of ventilation, use rollers and extending poles to save time, and a decent brush to cut round the edges first, also a large roller tray to save time re loading it
and dont paint yourself into a corner !!
Ask at the local builders merchants, it will usually be cheaper than the big sheds and better quality
then have a bag ready to throw away the rollers and brushes
 
I looked into epoxy before going with the interlocking ECOTILES.
To get the epoxy to stick well, you need to get the floor ground (epic dust) to get a solid substrate, and that quickly eliminated the price and time advantage.
I was able to do a 30m square garage in an easy mornings work. Only tools needed was a craft knife, a rule and a pencil.
 

Dr Death

War Hero
You could buy those industrial floor matting that interlocks to each other?
Machine Mart & Screw Fix sell it, just depends how sturdy you want it.
Could put epoxy down and then paint it using paint like in a warehouse/B&Q?
 
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I've got that hairy concrete stuff* on my garage floor; it's been there nigh on 40 years since the garage was the site's sales office, and is still stuck to the concrete. Easy to clean as well. Just give it a good brushing for light cleaning or a good seeing-to with the pressure washer and all the embedded dust and crap flows out of the garage door.

* Apparently its called Iron Duke.
 

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