Gaming Disorder or just bad parenting?

#21
Video games can be highly addictive, and don't necessarily mean you're any more likely to become addicted to something else later on. Certain types of games are more likely to cause addiction than others, especially games with a persistant world that you log into, such as Warcraft, Eve Online, and all that. They require unbelievable amounts of time investment to get anywhere, and more yet to maintain it. It's seldom someone is addicted to video games, more that they're addicted to a particular game. As such games require you to interact with other people, it becomes more difficult to notice that you've not been out in 5 days as you're still talking to your mates and continually meeting new people.

If your family are quite happy for you to spend countless hours on these types of game with no intervention, a kid can very easily get sucked into the 'must keep unlocking the best stuff' mentality and thats when it becomes a problem. Parental settings that disable games at a certain time force the kid to do something else for a few hours and generally snaps them out of it.
I agree with you on World of Warcraft. I had to almost physically force myself to stop playing that game and cancel the subscription. It's a vicious life-sucking bitch.
 
#22
You'll see plenty of adult addicts over here playing Poker Machines (I think you call those Fruit Machines over there). They know they've not a snowball's chance in Hell of winning in the long run, but real addicts will tell you they get into a "Zone," and once that happens they won't stop until they're broke and can raise no more money to put in the damn things. One local woman lost over $400,000 on the machines.

The various State Governments which allow the machines are well aware some adults become at the very least problem gamblers and a few become absolute degenerate gamblers such as the woman above, who wasn't losing just her own money but that of her employer as well. Governments are just as much aware of this as they are aware most smokers will develop a fatal smoking related illness, and that one in ten drinkers will go on until they are on meths, or their rotten livers give out and they die.

Yet they do little beside squawk out a few warnings, and the reason is simple, they make too much money out of cigarettes, alcohol, and gambling. And if one were to be brutally cynical about it, by the time an addict of either cigarettes or alcohol develops a real health problem because of it, they haven't much longer to live anyway. Their often premature deaths must save the Government a fortune in pensions they'd otherwise have to pay.

As often as not the kids of gambling or alcohol addicted parents may well be at home playing some PC or Xbox game or other while similarly zoned out, and quite possibly for essentially the same reason; to escape reality or boredom. I'd not be surprised if Governments make a few pennies out of the Xbox and PC games as well.
 
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#23
Games consoles nowadays have every parental control you could possibly want. You can set the hours they can be used to largely whatever you require. If you've left your kid on a game long enough for them to become addicted, you have your parenting skills solely to blame.
Has anyone told the parents?
 
#24
Has anyone told the parents?
You can't set up the console without actively chinning them off. If they let a nine year old go plugging things into TVs, sockets and sit there creating email addresses the parents probably have some extra issues to address!
 
#25
Cool. Does this mean I can get PC games on prescription now?
I do hope so, the spends on my Steam account are phenomenal.

BTW: Just Cause 1, 2 & 3 for a little over a fiver this weekend.
 
#26
You can't set up the console without actively chinning them off. If they let a nine year old go plugging things into TVs, sockets and sit there creating email addresses the parents probably have some extra issues to address!
Most parents probably aren't tech-savvy enough to properly control their childrens' access to the internet. Beyond the basics I rely on my children and grandson (aged 13) to negotiate me through the technology maze. On my rare attempts at a PS game, my grandson is usually reduced to laughter at my ineptitude. I was unaware until I read this post thread about being able to set the PS to turn itself off and I'm pretty sure my daughter doesn't know about it either. Control in our house is exercised verbally.
 
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#27
You can't set up the console without actively chinning them off. If they let a nine year old go plugging things into TVs, sockets and sit there creating email addresses the parents probably have some extra issues to address!
Or maybe the parents haven't a clue about technology and consider wee Jimmy a technical wizzkid so leave him to set it up not realising the repercussions.
 
#28
My wee lads Ma has an app on her phone that disables any access my wee lad has to his tablet at a chosen time.

He's completely addicted to his Xbox or tablet but I know that's a result of his Aspergers.. We still limit his time on them.
 
#29
Parents don't always know this stuff, a friend bought a cheap laptop for their kid with no dedicated graphics card and then asked me why it won't run the games they'd bought for their kid


But parents with younger kids, the number of times I see them use a tablet as a baby sitting device, with CBeebies stuff or cartoons running on it for hours, I think addiction to technology is not on their radar


I doubt it will change habits, as technology has become another way to keep kids from bothering their parents
 
#30
Much sense said. We never allowed even a TV in bedrooms unless the kids were poorly for a longish period - and then they mainly slept. Computers were in shared spaces only. Controllers have been known to go to work as a punishment. Our kids would often be woken at 4am by others on the phone who were under a different regime. Games are very immerisve - and easily become habitual. Otherwise exellent parents we know may well be reaping a whirlwind of supervices - yet frequent - computer entertainment. Sad.


I fear me that there needs perhaps to be a caring intervention for the Mother of Beavers.......
 
#31
this gaming malarkey is the same as 'affluenza'. Sh*t parenting. You don't even have to be tech savvy, as long as you know your way around a socket. My kids just get told 'you've been on too long' and they get off. Or they KNOW they will lose kindle, internet, Tele or (down to specifics) paw patrol and my little pony privileges. Minimum ban. One week. 'Can I go on sonic' (it's back!) is met with 'have you read/tidied/homeworked/etc'? They haven't asked in ages and answered the above with a 'no' because they know that I will send them to complete that task first. We've discussed the little girl swamping herself play computers. My children understand that should they do that then I'll rub their noses in it, make them tidy up and then remove privileges on electrical items until they are 18.
 
#32
I'll add, I've previously worked on a gambling project with someone who has worked very closely with Henrietta. She's an excellent psychiatrist (running one of the only NHS gambling treatment centres in London/the UK) and also a world expert in addiction and has published research on all aspects from treatment predictors to the underlying neurobiology of addiction, so she certainly knows what she is talking about and also very well placed to make this thing work.
 
#33
A lot of unnecessary time , expense and failure can be avoided by early sensible research and intervention - once adequate example has been explored and justified proofworthy even if it has to ride as a topic of Chatteratti excuse for a while to gain exposure. Kids have been segregated by age, and are being segregated indoors becuase of the big bad world outside - rather than teach them how to navigate the risks safely - so this was just waiting to happen. Some problems ares not swiftly rectified once established - as an example in progress - the effects of overly accessible porn to the inexperienced has lead to a dangerous rewiring of immature human sexuality: and current practical experience has measured that it takes 2 years to deprogramme human responses learned early.
 
#34
Most parents probably aren't tech-savvy enough to properly control their childrens' access to the internet. Beyond the basics I rely on my children and grandson (aged 13) to negotiate me through the technology maze. On my rare attempts at a PS game, my grandson is usually reduced to laughter at my ineptitude. I was unaware until I read this post thread about being able to set the PS to turn itself off and I'm pretty sure my daughter doesn't know about it either. Control in our house is exercised verbally.
Yeah, and that's to be expected and totally fine. Doesn't change the fact that it's their fault the kid has developed an addiction to a game. It may have just been through ignorance of the implications of letting a child play Fortnite for 20 out of 24 hours in a day, but the blame still lies with them. It certainly does not lie with the game developers, or the console manufacturers, or anyone else that parents seem to want to blame for it.

I think you're certainly correct to just verbally police it if you don't know how to work stuff. My kid has an unrestricted console, but as soon as he starts taking the piss he gets parental controls slapped on again. Microsoft and Sony really have gone out their way to make setting up parental controls as easy as humanly possible for people who they know sill struggle with it.
 
#35
Most parents probably aren't tech-savvy enough to properly control their childrens' access to the internet
That is no excuse. How many parents would take the same attitude with other hobbies and pastimes - particlarly sports. "I don't understand technology" is a complete cop-out. If your kids are into it, it's your duty to understand - same as if they are into football, rugby, ballet, kart racing, basket weaving, or anything else.

The littlest ninja did trampolining, a sport I had no knowledge or interest in. I could bore you all to death with the rules, regulations, how they've changes over the years, etc. etc. etc.

How many parents (over?) involve themselves with their kids sports, but refuse to pay any attention to their interest in computers and games?

It's bad parenting. Simple as that.
 
#36
I'll add, I've previously worked on a gambling project with someone who has worked very closely with Henrietta. She's an excellent psychiatrist (running one of the only NHS gambling treatment centres in London/the UK) and also a world expert in addiction and has published research on all aspects from treatment predictors to the underlying neurobiology of addiction, so she certainly knows what she is talking about and also very well placed to make this thing work.
No no no - this is ARRSE man! You cannot go bringing Science and personal experience of working with someone from the 'we never had it in our day' and 'I could solve it' schools.

Is Gaming Disorder similar to gambling addiction in adults?
 
#37
I'll add, I've previously worked on a gambling project with someone who has worked very closely with Henrietta. She's an excellent psychiatrist (running one of the only NHS gambling treatment centres in London/the UK) and also a world expert in addiction and has published research on all aspects from treatment predictors to the underlying neurobiology of addiction, so she certainly knows what she is talking about and also very well placed to make this thing work.
Are you saying that she has created a job for herself?
 

AfghanAndy

On ROPS
On ROPs
#39
I agree with you on World of Warcraft. I had to almost physically force myself to stop playing that game and cancel the subscription. It's a vicious life-sucking bitch.
There’s a lot like that, especially the ones you have to log on, have to invest so much time, but can spend your way into buying the bolt on’s you need.

I do understand that games can be addictive if sorts, but it is poor parenting in many cases. My wife just bags me to stop playing.
 
#40
Is Gaming Disorder similar to gambling addiction in adults?
I don't know if the presentation is exactly the same, but the harms are certainly comparable. Gambling addiction can be measured in one of two ways, most people will be unable to afford their addiction and their problems are financial. The other harm is time, in that they spend more time than they can afford on gambling.

I would expect gaming harms are in the latter category - although with the recent additions such as loot boxes etc, I suspect some financial harms will be seen now -and perhaps the RNG there (not knowing what you will get from a loot box) will contribute towards developing addiction.

As an example, the time related harms actually reminds me of a gentleman who took part in the study I worked on, he was one of the shops best customers and would spend a couple of 1000 per day on the electronic slot machines (FOBTs).

Financially it didn't matter to him because he owned most of the commercial premises in the town, however whilst I was assessing him for addiction, he admitted what really bothered him about playing was how he missed his kids growing up and spent so much time away from his family playing on those machines.
 

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