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Gallipoli Quote by Ataturk

#1
Reading the last couple of posts on the 'Falkland's Veterans (Raise Your Glasses)' thread reminded me of a quote by Ataturk inscribed on one of the monuments at ANZAC Bay on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey.

Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives. You are now living in the soil of a friendly country therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours.

You, the mothers, who sent their sons from faraway countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.


May we all possess magnanimity when it comes to remembering our 'honest' foes!
 
#4
As I understand it the British Army has only twice ever 'Hated' firstly against the Indian mutineers secondly against the Japanese.
 
#9
Handy soldier Johnny Turk, they did well in Korea too by all accounts.
There's an old chap ran a breakfast stall in Jinchang, Gansu, who fought in Korea. He said to me once something on the lines of "American firepower was terrible but we could deal with their men. The Turks would never give up and we had to kill them where they were".

I bet JT has a few dits for the 'Famous Last Stands' thread.

If it's been sent from my HTC Sensation using Tapatalk then I'm probably pissed.
 
#10
Reading the last couple of posts on the 'Falkland's Veterans (Raise Your Glasses)' thread reminded me of a quote by Ataturk inscribed on one of the monuments at ANZAC Bay on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey.

Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives. You are now living in the soil of a friendly country therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours.

You, the mothers, who sent their sons from faraway countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.


May we all possess magnanimity when it comes to remembering our 'honest' foes!
Damn! bloody dust in here is awful.
 
#11
There's an old chap ran a breakfast stall in Jinchang, Gansu, who fought in Korea. He said to me once something on the lines of "American firepower was terrible but we could deal with their men. The Turks would never give up and we had to kill them where they were".

I bet JT has a few dits for the 'Famous Last Stands' thread.

If it's been sent from my HTC Sensation using Tapatalk then I'm probably pissed.
I remember reading that even when taken prisoner they were the Koreans' least favourite, refusing utterly to co-operate or speak anything other than Turkish: not a language widely spoken in N Korea
 
R

renamed_user

Guest
#12
"Oi Abdul! extra chile sauce on mine."

Sorry that's all I could think of when it comes to the Turk. Visiting the battlefield is on my to do list.
 
F

fozzy

Guest
#13
There's an old chap ran a breakfast stall in Jinchang, Gansu, who fought in Korea. He said to me once something on the lines of "American firepower was terrible but we could deal with their men. The Turks would never give up and we had to kill them where they were".

I bet JT has a few dits for the 'Famous Last Stands' thread.

If it's been sent from my HTC Sensation using Tapatalk then I'm probably pissed.
What was the dit from their famous General, when ordered to withdraw by the US commander after their position was overrun? Something like "Retreat? But we're killing them!"

Awesome.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#14
Handy soldier Johnny Turk, they did well in Korea too by all accounts.
I once attended an E&E course where the survival rates of UN troops as POWs of the Noth Koreans were quoted.
The US came off worse even as a ratio but the Turks did best.
The instructors comment was something along the lines of a POW camp for the Turks was possibly better conditions than active service in their army!

Tough feckers no doubt!
 
#16
Tell that to the Greek Cypriots.
As I understand it their discipline is still on the tough side. A colleague who'd served in Cyprus (mid 1990s) recalled how after a couple of British troops had got drunk and crossed the Green Zone, the Turkish commander summoned his Brit colleague and asked him to give some very good reasons why the Turks shouldn't court martial and execute their sentry for disobeying standing orders and not killing the drunks.
 
#17
I remember reading that even when taken prisoner they were the Koreans' least favourite, refusing utterly to co-operate or speak anything other than Turkish: not a language widely spoken in N Korea
You likely mean Prisoners of the Chinese. Norks tended to murder anyone who fell into their hands. Pops and his plt were digging foxholes in October 50 and they found 4 G.I.'s (from 24th ID) hands tied with barbed wire and PPsh'd in the back.
 
#18
I once attended an E&E course where the survival rates of UN troops as POWs of the Noth Koreans were quoted.
The US came off worse even as a ratio but the Turks did best.
The instructors comment was something along the lines of a POW camp for the Turks was possibly better conditions than active service in their army!
I'd heard that one as well.
 
#20
Warriors of the BAOR campaign will remember Turks as surly bastards who liked to fight with perfectly well behaved Britischers. I think they saw us as worthy combatants, unlike Jerry who had been so emasculated since 1945 that they preferred to slap like frauen.
 

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