Gallipoli 1915

While trawling the inter web tonight I came across a story on the ABC site leading up to ANZAC Day of interviews with veterans from conflicts ranging from WW1 to Afghanistan. Obviously, some were dragged from their archives such as the interview from a soldier who had been at Gallipoli. The interview was illustrated with a photograph taken at ANZAC Cove in 1915, shown below.

ANZAC Cove Gallipoli.jpg


Not shown here is the name of the photographer. It was my paternal grandfather - Arthur John Lovett. To say I was gobsmacked is an understatement. I knew he served there but never knew he took photographs which are now part of the Australian War Museum collection. Finding this I searched the AWM site and found the rest of the collection.

My grandfather's photographs (link to AWM)

He enlisted as a 20 year old, was part of the reinforcements who went to Gallipoli, was evacuated on medical grounds in August and wound up in the UK where he obtained a commission in a UK regiment. While at Gallipoli he took part in the attack at Lone Pine before his evacuation. He spent the rest of the war in England although at one stage he was on notice for transfer to Ireland but was not required. While at Gallipoli he kept a diary which we found in his papers after his death. My father donated the diary to Australian Army museum in Hobart, along with his sword collection.

I have no idea in what regiment he obtained a commission and if anyone can give me ideas on how to trace that I would be grateful.
 
While trawling the inter web tonight I came across a story on the ABC site leading up to ANZAC Day of interviews with veterans from conflicts ranging from WW1 to Afghanistan. Obviously, some were dragged from their archives such as the interview from a soldier who had been at Gallipoli. The interview was illustrated with a photograph taken at ANZAC Cove in 1915, shown below.

View attachment 467691

Not shown here is the name of the photographer. It was my paternal grandfather - Arthur John Lovett. To say I was gobsmacked is an understatement. I knew he served there but never knew he took photographs which are now part of the Australian War Museum collection. Finding this I searched the AWM site and found the rest of the collection.

My grandfather's photographs (link to AWM)

He enlisted as a 20 year old, was part of the reinforcements who went to Gallipoli, was evacuated on medical grounds in August and wound up in the UK where he obtained a commission in a UK regiment. While at Gallipoli he took part in the attack at Lone Pine before his evacuation. He spent the rest of the war in England although at one stage he was on notice for transfer to Ireland but was not required. While at Gallipoli he kept a diary which we found in his papers after his death. My father donated the diary to Australian Army museum in Hobart, along with his sword collection.

I have no idea in what regiment he obtained a commission and if anyone can give me ideas on how to trace that I would be grateful.
That's Ari Burnu, just south from the Anzac Commemoration Site - around the headland in the picture (which people mis-identify as the location of the original landings). There is now a two lane road above the beach (at about the height of the cliff in the middle ground), otherwise the pace is unchanged, apart from the CWGC cemeteries.

Quite remarkable photographs given the very slow film speed (equivalent to about 16 ASA/DIN today) and very slow lenses - a fast lens was f 6.3. Image No 9 of an unexploded shell is probably from 'Asiatic Annie' a Krupp 280 mm howitzer located near Çanakkale, on the Asian side of the Dardanelles. This gun continued throughout the campaign to drop shells on the Allied positions. She would have done a lot more damage if it were not for the heroic efforts of the British, Australian and French submarines that swept the Sea of Marmara of all shipping, so supplies and ammunition had to be conveyed by land. Railways were also taken out in what today would be regarded as SF operations, by teams landed from submarines.
 
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@slick - thanks for the heads up:

Name:Arthur John Lovett
Birth Date:14 Nov 1893
Birth Place:Hobart Tasmania
Year Range:1939 - 1948
Enlistment Place:Hobart Tasmania
Service Number:T253516
Next of Kin:Olive Lovett
Series Description:B884: Army Citizen Military Forces

The above basic information can be investigated further here:

Source Citation
National Archives of Australia; Canberra, Australia; Citizen Military Forces Personnel Dossiers, 1939-1947; Series: B884

Just to go back to the MIC kindly provided by Slick: as you can see, Arthur (being from Taz) initially enlisted in the 3rd Light Horse, Australian Imperial Force. His 3-medal group (if you have access to them?) might seem a touch odd as they will reflect 2 different ranks (Lt and Tpr) and 2 different Regts (3 LH and 2nd R Fus), with his 15 Star and VM being sourced from Oz.

Also note that he was (it would seem) quite seriously wounded whilst serving with 3 LH: the annotation noting that he did not see overseas service after his commission but also there is an annotation for an issue of the Silver War Badge (SWB). It is also noted that the authority for his SWB is dated 16 May 18 and awarded 24 May 18-thus his injuries led to him being discharged well before the end of the War.

SR 1.jpg


Above (obviously) is Page 1 of his Service Records-I'll download the remainder later.
 
The copy of the SWB Roll for Arthur:

SWB List.jpg


When Slick popped up the MIC, I was surprised that the card did not include an address as (nearly) all Officers MICs did, not so those for ORs.

However, this SWB Roll does include that information, which is yet another avenue of research for you.
 
Guys, thank you very much for the information. My understanding that the reason for his evacuation from Gallipoli was due to a serious medical issue, not an injury but could be mistaken. The initial information provided by 40C was his WW2 service as a Major when he didn't serve overseas. The next of kin mentioned, Olive Lovett was my grandmother whom he met in London while based there.

I cannot remember his medal rack and they have also been donated to the Army museum along with his swords (his service one was a Wilkinson) so are not available to view as not everything is displayed.
 
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Guys, thank you very much for the information. My understanding that the reason for his evacuation from Gallipoli was due to a serious medical issue, not an injury but could be mistaken. The initial information provided by 40C was his WW2 service as a Major when he didn't serve overseas. The next of kin mentioned, Olive Lovett was my grandmother whom he met in London while based there.

I cannot remember his medal rack and they have also been donated to the Army museum along with his swords (his service one was a Wilkinson) so are not available to view as not everything is displayed.

Family anecdote, in this case, is correct: working my way through his Service Records and he was, indeed, evacuated from theatre due to illness and not wounds or other hurts.

There is also a letter, from Arthur and dated 1968, where he applies for this:


. . . now, back to downloading!
 
My understanding that the reason for his evacuation from Gallipoli was due to a serious medical issue, not an injury but could be mistaken.
Probably not mistaken, 1000's were evacuated for a variety of illnesses,
Lack of sanitation in the heat caused a prolific outbreak of disease. Men suffered from dysentery, gastroenteritis, typhoid fever, pneumonia and cholera and faced plagues of fleas, flies and rats.
So, even in a month when the fighting was at its most intense, and there was a major new offensive opened up by the allies, still over 6% of men were dying from disease and illness. For other months this is much higher. In December for example, 49% of all allied deaths at Gallipoli were due to disease and illness. A good example of illness at Gallipoli was the case of Private John Riordan from Tralee. He was 33 years of age when he landed in Gallipoli and was evacuated suffering from gastroenteritis, and subsequently contracted dysentery while in hospital in Malta. He was the shipped to England to recover. Although Private Riordan didn’t die of his illnesses (he was killed in action in France in October 1917), he contracted exactly the kinds of illnesses that did kill so many of his fellow soldiers.
 
And again . . .

SR12.jpg
SR13.jpg
SR14.jpg
SR15.jpg
SR16.jpg
SR17.jpg
SR19.jpg


SR18.jpg
SR20.jpg


I love dealing with Oz records of the period: they are complete and (mostly) tell the individual soldier's story from A to Z. Sadly, UK records are not so complete, mainly due to fire damage and destruction during 1940 Blitz raid.
 
Final tranche of stuff:

SR21.jpg


I've included this one simply because it was in his online file though, obviously, it relates to a different man:

SR22.jpg


SR23.jpg


SR24.jpg


Absolutely delightful stuff and a pleasure to research him.
 
A few associated bits and bobs:

A brief abstract relating to Arthur's WWII service:

Name:Arthur John Lovett
Birth Date:14 Nov 1893
Birth Place:Hobart Tasmania
Year Range:1939 - 1948
Enlistment Place:Hobart Tasmania
Service Number:T253516
Next of Kin:Olive Lovett
Series Description:B884: Army Citizen Military Forces

As you can see, it notes that he was CMF-that is older men and women who would not be expected to serve outside Australia. For that service he would (probably) have been awarded the War Medal and Australian Service Medal. If you wish, can order (and pay for) further information here:


In 1918, Arthur was invalided home to Oz-he is named on this passenger list:

Passenger List.jpg


Unfortunately, the quality is not that good but you should be able to make out that, though he travels as a serving Army officer, his status is given as 'Diplomat'. If captured, that status would hopefully give him some protection.

And finally, his daughter turns up in a search:

Arthur-Daughter.jpg


A Brazilian visa, given in her married name. There is a further mention elsewhere, noting her death in the US in 1998.
 
@FourZeroCharlie , what was his shoe size and favourite colour?

Excellent work and very interesting.
 
Probably not mistaken, 1000's were evacuated for a variety of illnesses,
Rupert Brooke died from an infected mosquito bite (not even malaria) en-route to Gallipoli, he didn't even make it there.

The 3rd London General Hospital Building is still there, now the Royal Victoria Patriotic Building, converted into flats for yuppies.
So is the Fullbourne Road, Walthamstow address mentioned in post #6, you could see it on Google street view.
ISTR that the Australian sergeant in 'A Town Like Alice' described similar terraced housing in Ealing (where Nevil Shute was from) as 'a right slum'. Pte Lovett was probably unimpressed.

Edit; It was Hammersmith.

I asked if he had found his Father's house at Hammersmith.
"I found it," he said. "Oh my word, I did."
"Pretty bad?"
He grinned. "That's putting it mild. We got some slums in Australia, but nothing like that. Dad did all right for himself when he come away from that and out to Queensland."


I'm from Hammersmith. He must have been talking about my family mansion.
 
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Gentlemen, and especially @FourZeroCharlie I am indebted to your efforts and thank you from the bottom of my heart.

My grandfather, who was nearly always called Jack, was a very special person in my somewhat traumatic childhood who introduced me to the joys of fly fishing and things rural. As evidenced by his photographs (I never saw him use one or even own one) he had an eye for composition and throughout his life he was a very keen artist (mostly landscapes).

The Brazilian reference to my aunt was due to her marriage to an orthopaedic pathologist who travelled frequently for research and conferences. He went on to become one of the world's leading specialists in his field. As an aside, his brother was one of only six Australian nationals who could speak Japanese at the outbreak of the Pacific war.

Again, thank you all for your efforts and information.
 

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