Gallbladder removal

Just heard a mate in his forties is having his gallbladder removed , whats that all about? how will it affect him?
 
No personal experience, but a pal of mine had his removed after suffering frequent abdominal pain. It used to be quite a serious op, but now it's microsurgery.

I think my mate takes a pill daily to compensate for whatever it is that the gall bladder produces (bile?). Apart from that he eats and drinks as he did before.
 
Practical bit - My wife has hers taken out about that age. Baring cock ups it will solve some of his stomach pains [that will probably be what persuaded him to go to the doctor] and he might find his ability to eat fatty foods like chips and battered items is limited. I stress might because it had no appreciable effect on my wife. I believe the operation is usually key hole surgery so he'll be out and about in only a couple of days with three very small scars that definitely aren't worth showing off.
Science bit - The gall bladder is a relatively small sac on the way out of the liver that stores bile [a digestive chemical mix] until your stomach empties and then dumps its contents into the duodenum to mix with the partly digested ex stomach contents. One of it's roles is to neutralise stomach acid. Lacking the bladder to store the bile it just dribbles into the duodenum on a steady basis, which is not as efficient and means after a large meal you may not have enough for an hour or two leading to some pain or bloating sensations. The problem with gall bladders is that they can get stones, balls of undissolved cholesterol, in them and when these move it hurts. This is the most common reason for removal although there are plenty of other options.
Related but sort off off topic bit - If you routinely gut/clean animals the gall bladder is the little dark coloured sac just under the liver that you don't want to cut into with your knife [or otherwise damage] if you want to keep, cook, eat the liver because bile tastes, er billious, or not very nice and if you puncture the sac it will soak into the surrounding tissue fairly quickly.
 
It's called a cholecystectomy and is usually done laparoscopically under GA. Known in the trade as a Lap Choley. Takes about an hour or so.

Not withstanding other co-morbidities, post op prognosis is usually good
 
*serious head on*

The gall bladder basically stores some stuff that helps digest fat. When it's removed the "stuff" continuously trickles into your gut, rather than being released after a meal.

I had mine removed a couple of years ago, and haven't really noticed any difference, but that's with a fairly healthy and regular intake of grub.

There are potential problems with removal though (some serious enough for me to swerve it initially). But, as I found out the hard way, there are also potential problems with not having it removed.
 
It can only be removed via your eye, and no anestetic can be used, the only known post op care is squirting tincbenz on the open wound every 5 minutes. Takes about 18 months to heal.
 
It can only be removed via your eye, and no anestetic can be used, the only known post op care is squirting tincbenz on the open wound every 5 minutes. Takes about 18 months to heal.
To be honest, that's pretty much my experience...
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Just heard a mate in his forties is having his gallbladder removed , whats that all about? how will it affect him?
Don't worry you'll be fine. It might hurt a bit but it's pretty routine. So a mate of mine said.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I wish I was in my forties.
I sometimes think that but I got cancer in my forties, luckily enough I was well looked after. Within reason it's quite remarkable what the docs and the surgical medical teams can do.
 

no_idea

War Hero
I had mine out about 12 years ago via microsurgery. Couple of days in hospital then carry on. There were a couple of gorgeous blonde nurses but that is another story.

I now watch my diet to avoid excessively fatty foods otherwise no real change. Constipation is no longer an issue. I've never been given any pills to take for it.
 

socialdespatch

War Hero
It's called a cholecystectomy and is usually done laparoscopically under GA. Known in the trade as a Lap Choley. Takes about an hour or so.

Not withstanding other co-morbidities, post op prognosis is usually good
And you'll have the warm feeling of knowing how useful you have been for paramedic and junior anaesthetist training. ;)
 

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