FUTURISTIC BOOKS AND FILMS SET IN DATES THAT HAVE NOW PASSED

Bit of a thread drift, I'm afraid but it's something I've been thinking about recently and I suppose this thread's theme is as good as any to post.
The time-travelling aspect of films
In a way, we are able to glimpse the future because we know 'what became of so and so?"

Who can watch the re-runs of films like the Superman series without thinking of Christopher Reeve ending up paralysed from the neck down, or films of Robin Williams topping himself.
Of course, the fate of some are so well known that it seems nothing out of the ordinary, Leslie Howard, Marilyn Monroe- James Dean, Judy Garland for example.
But it's among the lesser-known that it gets a bit more strange, if not spooky. The number of times I've checked out the name of an actor or actress only to find either they died young, often of suicides or alcohol problems. It happen an awful lot.
Of course, people live long lives or they live short lives, it's just a bit spooky (and sad) to see some of them captured on the screen at a moment in time, oblivious of their future destiny whereas we know what the future has in store for them, as we watch the film.
Ironically, Christopher Reeve's best work, in my opinion, was 'Somewhere in Time', a film about non technological time travel.
 
On a serious note, War Games

David Lightman, a bright but unmotivated Seattle high school student and hacker, uses his IMSAI 8080 computer to access the school district's computer system and change his grades. He does the same for his friend and classmate Jennifer Mack. Later, while war dialing numbers in Sunnyvale, California, to find a computer game company, he connects with a system that does not identify itself. Asking for games, he finds a list that starts with chess, checkers, backgammon, and poker, as well as titles such as "Theaterwide Biotoxic and Chemical Warfare" and "Global Thermonuclear War", but cannot proceed further. Two hacker friends explain the concept of a backdoor password and suggest tracking down the Falken referenced in "Falken's Maze", the first game listed. David discovers that Stephen Falken was an early artificial-intelligence researcher, and David guesses correctly that the name of Falken's deceased son (Joshua) is the password.
Yawn. Intel 8088 chips. How quaint.
IBM 8080.JPG
 

Slime

LE
One of the trailers for Dune made me aware they've put Isaac Asimov's 'Foundation' series into TV on Apple+. Amazing.

There is a really good audio version the BBC made.
It’s available free on the Vibrivox app.
 
That’s the other thing I find interesting looking at past sci fi attempts, how impractical much of the clothing is and how it reflected the fashion of the day. Space 1999 and Star Trek were in that same mould, space personnel wearing things like flared trousers, plastic belts and a dearth of pockets. Contrast that with the more recent sci-fi stuff and the clothing is far more pragmatic, and one would assume, realistic, flight coveralls and combat uniforms being the norm.
Costumes in sci-fi films began changing after Ridley Scott's original Alien.

md16030385620.jpg


In this book it says that the whole film was meant to look believeable with "realistic" clothing and props. Hence the worn and lived-in look of the crew uniforms and the interior of the Nostromo...

224880793610377.jpg


book-alien-06.jpg


The contributing artists are Ron Cobb, Chriss Foss and H.R. Giger. Giger designed the alien while the other two focused on the Nostromo spaceship and set designs. Cobb would design rooms and details that were meant to look functional, and in many cases were functional. Actors got to hit real buttons and something would happen. Moebius, on a very brief stint, designed the spacesuits which were used in the movie.

One of the reasons Alien worked so well as a film is that it was based in a "real" working environment, not some super shiny "futuristic" paradise. You spent more time considering the characters and plot rather than simply goggling at the SAFX...
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
'Robots are going to take over Man's dirtiest jobs . . . clearing his garbage, tending his sick, even fighting his wars! By the year 2078 people will change their robots as today they change their cars. So step now through the slick plasto-glass doors of "Flash" Harry Lowder's robo-mart in the year 2078 ' Ro-Busters - Starlord before amalgamation with 2000AD.

It's coming, maybe sooner than we think.
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
Probably more of an alternative timeline- Brazil with Terry Gillam and Michael Palin. I think it's here and now.
 

R0B

War Hero
With our recent obsession about harmless books from a previous era Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 (1966) springs to mind (recently remade - only seen the original).

ETA: Based in 1955
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
Costumes in sci-fi films began changing after Ridley Scott's original Alien.

md16030385620.jpg


In this book it says that the whole film was meant to look believeable with "realistic" clothing and props. Hence the worn and lived-in look of the crew uniforms and the interior of the Nostromo...

224880793610377.jpg


book-alien-06.jpg


The contributing artists are Ron Cobb, Chriss Foss and H.R. Giger. Giger designed the alien while the other two focused on the Nostromo spaceship and set designs. Cobb would design rooms and details that were meant to look functional, and in many cases were functional. Actors got to hit real buttons and something would happen. Moebius, on a very brief stint, designed the spacesuits which were used in the movie.

One of the reasons Alien worked so well as a film is that it was based in a "real" working environment, not some super shiny "futuristic" paradise. You spent more time considering the characters and plot rather than simply goggling at the SAFX...

anyone that knows me knows of my Alien obsession, but when it comes to 'truckers in space' everyone bangs on about Alien but no one (bar mark kermode) ever mentions Silent Running from 1972 -

silent-runningpoker-with-the-crewmen2.jpg


btw, never specifically dated, but the spoken intro at the start makes mention of 'the first day of this new century' - which could make it this century. or the next one.
 
Ironically, Christopher Reeve's best work, in my opinion, was 'Somewhere in Time', a film about non technological time travel.
I remember that film as I had a total crush on Jane Seymour after seeing it.
 
anyone that knows me knows of my Alien obsession, but when it comes to 'truckers in space' everyone bangs on about Alien but no one (bar mark kermode) ever mentions Silent Running from 1972 -

silent-runningpoker-with-the-crewmen2.jpg


btw, never specifically dated, but the spoken intro at the start makes mention of 'the first day of this new century' - which could make it this century. or the next one.


We don't mention it because the ending makes us cry.......

(Sniff)

......poor little robot.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer

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