Further Evidence of Dumbing Down (Outrage Bus Not Reqd)

#1
Bournemouth Council have issued guidelines banning the use of Latin expressions, particularly "when staff are writing to those whose first language may not be English".

Now, forgive me my naivety, but I would have thought that the use of a non-English language, when writing to those whose first language is not English, may actually be of some benefit, setting aside the reality that many of these folk actually have a far better grasp of English than our own home-bred illiteratti.

I particularly enjoyed the statement from The Campaign for Plain English, whose spokesman said "the ban might stop people confusing the Latin abbreviation e.g. with the word 'egg'".

Couldn't make it up.
 
#2
Defies belief.

The 'oik' explaining the decision was spouting the 'Prescott' brand of social animosity.

Although this awful man was on the wireless (sorry - radio; even more sorry - tuner) he came over so clearly as a sandal wearing; bearded; Grauniad reading; well-adjusted failure in life, with a chip on each shoulder.

PS: Remember, if you do not educate 'the people' properly, they will have a lesser opportunity to oppose your views in the future.

In other words, encourage the lager-swilling, un-employed, 'benefits dependant, to 'stay that way, and they will always vote for you!
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#4
Do you think Bournmouth Council would understand that well known Anglo Saxon phrase that goes "Fuck off you bunch of pinko arseholes"?
 
#7
Is the banning of obscure and unnecessary non-English terms in official communication, really an example of dumbing down? Or an example of wising up?

Why should our laws and documents be written in a foreign language? Would any of you accept that if the EU were imposing it?
 
#8
I'm sure there's room for a bit of quid pro quo.
 
#11
smartascarrots said:
Is the banning of obscure and unnecessary non-English terms in official communication, really an example of dumbing down? Or an example of wising up?

Why should our laws and documents be written in a foreign language? Would any of you accept that if the EU were imposing it?
Several local authorities have ruled that phrases like "vice versa", "pro rata", and even "via" should not be used, in speech or in writing.
A Campaign spokesman said the ban might stop people confusing the Latin abbreviation e.g. with the word "egg".
Obscure terms shouldn't be used, but do people really confuse e.g. with 'egg' ?
 
#12
Markintime said:
PoisonDwarf said:
I'm sure there's room for a bit of quid pro quo.
I may take the council to court if I can find someone to take it on Pro Bono and can get it heard In Camera. I may send out invites marked PRTHI (oh alright, RSVP then.
Think they're acting ultra vires?
 
#15
This time it is really urgent that we do nothing. Never has it been more important to maintain the status quo.







Coatimundi......................toxophily (uter sinisterre bollix)
 
#16
smartascarrots said:
Is the banning of obscure and unnecessary non-English terms in official communication, really an example of dumbing down? Or an example of wising up?

Why should our laws and documents be written in a foreign language? Would any of you accept that if the EU were imposing it?
All languages incorporate expressions from others and are none the worse for it.

On your principle, you will clearly object to words such as bungalow and pyjamas - derived for the sub-continent.

Meanwhile in the Middle East for example, commercial negotiations, even between Arabs, are often conducted and formalised in English because arabic does not have words to describe the intricacies of modern business.
 
#17
Balleh said:
All languages incorporate expressions from others and are none the worse for it.

On your principle, you will clearly object to words such as bungalow and pyjamas - derived for the sub-continent.

Meanwhile in the Middle East for example, commercial negotiations, even between Arabs, are often conducted and formalised in English because arabic does not have words to describe the intricacies of modern business.
Where the expressions are widely known, there's no problem. How many people are taught Latin these days and what need is there for them to be? Why keep it as part of civil life when there's a perfectly good national language being used in everyday life?

That's my principle, not the one you're suggesting. Does Latin have the ability to describe the intricacies of modern business?
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#20
Surely if you have more than a couple of synapses firing together and a passing knowledge of English, Latin isn't that difficult?
 

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