Funerals and all that shit ...

Are there any independents left these days?

I thought they had all been subsumed into ‘groups’ in the same way an awful lot of veterinaries have been swallowed up but still trade under the same trusted name that yer grannie used to take tibbles and fido to decades ago.
Yes, in a short word.

Though be careful: Co-Op, Dignity, etc have hoovered up an awful lot of small independents but retained the original name, which they will do for some years until those that remember have gone.

Look for the tell-tale 'Part of the . . . group' in smallish print at the bottom of the blurb.

If you need to, check out the company here: UK Independent Funeral Directors | SAIF
 
We've had quite a few funerals in the last 10 years, but their estates could all afford them.

For many families, 2- 5k is a crippling expense, there should be a fairer way for a cheap, but dignified send- off.......;.
 
We've had quite a few funerals in the last 10 years, but their estates could all afford them.

For many families, 2- 5k is a crippling expense, there should be a fairer way for a cheap, but dignified send- off.......;.

They are available for rent :)
 
I'm 75 and death doesn't worry me anymore, my wife is 10 years younger than me, it upsets me to know
she will be on her own,
nah, she's be shacked up with the milk man before your cold...
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
I strongly suspect that you've misunderstood/misremembered: for starters, there would have been a coffin . . . and there would have been a 'funeral'.

If not, then your partner was badly served by which ever local authority had responsibility for the funeral. We've moved on a wee bit from 'Bring out yer dead . . ' and plague pits.

The Social Fund funerals that I dealt with were stark and simple-but any remaining family were always informed of time and place: that they didn't turn up was not really my concern, though the deceased was treated with as much care as any other 'client'.

On one occasion, the only mourners were two staff from the final care home. Though there was no formal religious committal, each was invited to share a thought or memory (which they did) and honour was served.

As I've said before, the funeral service is for the benefit of the living: the star turn probably doesn't have a view one way or the other.

Thanks for the info. "Misinformed" possibly - knowing the MiL, certainly not a case of "misremembering", these events were fairly recent and I was given to understand that no-one in the family was notified of the time of the "service" until after the event when they were simply told by the local authority that their relative had been cremated on (date/time).

Are you saying that that local authority who had jurisdiction over the disposal of bodies would always appoint a "funeral director" to do the business? In which case that funeral director could be contacted in relation to any private wishes?
 
Thanks for the info. "Misinformed" possibly - knowing the MiL, certainly not a case of "misremembering", these events were fairly recent and I was given to understand that no-one in the family was notified of the time of the "service" until after the event when they were simply told by the local authority that their relative had been cremated on (date/time).

Are you saying that that local authority who had jurisdiction over the disposal of bodies would always appoint a "funeral director" to do the business? In which case that funeral director could be contacted in relation to any private wishes?
I'd give a cautious 'yes' to that, not knowing how your particular council works.

IF the cremation was at a council facility, then-certainly-it would be council staff that dealt with that end.

However, those staff would not have any part in collection of the deceased (I assume from a hospital morgue?) as the paperwork involved requires the handing over of the 'Greenie', the FD's authority to collect the body. Plus, crem staff (council or private) are not in the Funeral business, only as a recipient and facilitator for the final act.

What I'm saying is that I would (almost) bet the house on a FD being involved in the final act: that he/she never contacted family would suggest that:

1. Nobody knew there was family.

2. The council failed, miserably.

3. The funeral service failed, miserably.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
I'd give a cautious 'yes' to that, not knowing how your particular council works.

IF the cremation was at a council facility, then-certainly-it would be council staff that dealt with that end.

However, those staff would not have any part in collection of the deceased (I assume from a hospital morgue?) as the paperwork involved requires the handing over of the 'Greenie', the FD's authority to collect the body. Plus, crem staff (council or private) are not in the Funeral business, only as a recipient and facilitator for the final act.

What I'm saying is that I would (almost) bet the house on a FD being involved in the final act: that he/she never contacted family would suggest that:

1. Nobody knew there was family.

2. The council failed, miserably.

3. The funeral service failed, miserably.

Cheers.

It's a complicated one because each case is different. In the case of our recently deceased young friend, I guess I just want to avoid the previous scenario, because he DID have friends who cared, even if his family didn't, and we'd like to intervene before it becomes a foregone conclusion - just not sure who to approach!
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Six years ago Zero Alpha's father died. We used Peacocks of Huntingdon, a local independent, where worked, coincidentally a retained fireman. (Stan had been Cambridgeshire's Specialist Advisor (Hazardous Substances) for a good many years after his wife died and he himself retired from chemical science. Every fireman in Cambridgeshire and surrounding counties, especially up and down the A1, knew that Finger-licking Stan would put himself between firemen and danger until he had sniff-tested and declared what the chemical was and how to handle it. His sniff test, from 100M upwind, looked like he was licking his fingers, he was swirling minute amounts of chemical in the air under his nose.)

The retained fireman took ownership of Stan's funeral, ensured all the local heads of emergency services attended and the funeral was essentially perfect and at a price Stan would have, and we did, approve.
 
Last edited:

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
We've had quite a few funerals in the last 10 years, but their estates could all afford them.

For many families, 2- 5k is a crippling expense, there should be a fairer way for a cheap, but dignified send- off.......;.
Aye. Mum wanted a wicker casket thinking it was the cheapest option; Undertakers saw that one coming as well as a cardboard fecking box! Soz Mum, wood it was as that was the cheapest. And feck hiring their cars, you could get a fun day out in a Ferrari for less.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
We've had quite a few funerals in the last 10 years, but their estates could all afford them.

For many families, 2- 5k is a crippling expense, there should be a fairer way for a cheap, but dignified send- off.......;.
clubs
Ive been saving a tenner a month in a Credit Union to pay for my funeral , also I have set up a DEATH FILE with details of computer passwords bank account , savings, pensions and any paperwork that points towards a death grant ( credit union pays out a grand on my death ) also any bits and bobs which anyone might find useful.

Then of course is my simple will.
 
We've had quite a few funerals in the last 10 years, but their estates could all afford them.

For many families, 2- 5k is a crippling expense, there should be a fairer way for a cheap, but dignified send- off.......;.

My father 93, has said that he wants to be given to the Tiki snacks pie factory, thus saving the family the cost of a funeral.
 
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