Funeral etiquette

#1
Hey guys

Need some help. Got a military funeral Monday for a very close ex gunner who passed away, just wondering on the etiquette as I've been cleared to wear No 2's. Been told multiple stuff from removing forage cap when coffin arrives to saluting it and everything inbetween. If anyone's in the know any help would be greatly aappreciated. Troop screws didn't have a scooby
 
#2
Under no circumstances should you kick the local community defib machine off the wall, pry open the coffin and give him numerous shocks whilst screaming, live you bastard, live.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
It's bad form to lower the coffin anywhere other than just short of the grave.
 
#4
Hey guys

Need some help. Got a military funeral Monday for a very close ex gunner who passed away, just wondering on the etiquette as I've been cleared to wear No 2's. Been told multiple stuff from removing forage cap when coffin arrives to saluting it and everything inbetween. If anyone's in the know any help would be greatly aappreciated. Troop screws didn't have a scooby
I take it that it is not a funeral with full military honours, but rather a normal veteran's funeral with a military theme? You are therefore going to have to "play it by ear" as it were.

Firstly, will you be the senior serving rank present? If you are not sure, turn up early and see if anyone at ranks you. If so, easy peasy, just follow what they do. Let's assume you are flying solo.

If you are it, it depends on whether it crematorium or service with interment. You may not be required at the interment (ie graveside).

If it's a Crematorium I would wait outside, and on the arrival give a smart salute. Whilst the funeral directors are "unloading" I would remove my titifer and scoot into the back of the chapel. After the service I would remember that I'm not just representing me but by the wearing of uniform, the Army. I would make it my business to speak to the close family/widow. I'd make sure I'd look them in the eye and on behalf of the Army thank them for the veterans service.

It goes without saying that your turn out, bearing and drill must be of the highest standard. It is normal to wear a black armband on the left upper arm, most units have them if you ask, but can be easily sorted with some broad black ribbon and a safety pin.

Veterans funerals are often attended by a Regimental/Corps Association standard bearer and/or trumpeter or bugler. If so, although unnofficial it is common courtesy to treat it as if it were a Colour or
Guidon, ie when uncased (ie being flown), pay it the compliment of a smart salute.

If the last post is played indoors, stand smartly to attention. If it is played outside so you are wearing headress, salute.

Remembering that I'm representing my Corps and the Army, I would also make it my business before/after the service to speak respectfully and shake the hand of any veterans present. Combat indicators are generally blazers with badges, medals and/or berets and capbadges.

What you are doing is a great privillage. I am sure you will do yourself, your unit, the Army and more importantly the veteran proud.
 
#5
If there are "refreshments" after then by all means chat with any veterans present. Being ex-soldiers they may well think it amusing to try and get the young lad in uniform shit-faced - so take care!

Using your smart uniform and spinning dits to impress any surviving female relatives is of course fully encouraged.
 
#6
If there are "refreshments" after then by all means chat with any veterans present. Being ex-soldiers they may well think it amusing to try and get the young lad in uniform shit-faced - so take care!

Using your smart uniform and spinning dits to impress any surviving female relatives is of course mandatory
Fixed.
 
#8
Some RBL members have their berets glued to their heads in church - don't be tempted to follow them.
The service convention (and you probably already know this) is service males headdress off, service females headdress on, in church.
 
#9
Some RBL members have their berets glued to their heads in church - don't be tempted to follow them.
The service convention (and you probably already know this) is service males headdress off, service females headdress on, in church.
It’s now hats off for females too. Equality and all that boll.......

Halloumikid
 
#10
Hey guys

Need some help. Got a military funeral Monday for a very close ex gunner who passed away, just wondering on the etiquette as I've been cleared to wear No 2's. Been told multiple stuff from removing forage cap when coffin arrives to saluting it and everything inbetween. If anyone's in the know any help would be greatly aappreciated. Troop screws didn't have a scooby
This is a very sorry state of affairs... We as a nation have had more than just a few Military funerals. Vetran's funerals, and military themed funerals. So many more...

Here's a place to start: RBL - Funerals - information for members
Far more info can be found in this very comprehensive publication: https://assets.publishing.service.g...ds/attachment_data/file/699476/2018-03287.pdf
 
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#14
Do not enquire of the widow if the deceased mentioned anything about a tin of paint before passing on.

If the wake is at the deceased's home, Do have a discreet search of his shed and remove his porn collection. You wouldn't want her to find an ex-Gunner's collection of one handed literature. The shock could kill her.
 
#17
#18
Thanks for that, it's quite informative.

I did, however, use the term 'convention' deliberately, and the regs do maintain the distinction between Male & Female although it does give female soldiers the option of removing their head-dress should they wish.

Quote from your link above;

""02.17. Church Parades and Services. Male personnel attending a church service are to remove headdress on entering the church. Female personnel may remove their headdress if they so wish but headdress is to be worn by all personnel forming part of a Colour Party. At formal drumhead services headdress outside, headdress is not to be removed. At informal services in the field, headdress may be removed if circumstances dictate""

Actually I think the hat removal option for ladies is not a bad thing, I saw on a service at Aldershot where European (ie non-Gurkha) female soldiers from the Gurkha Logistics Regiment wearing Terai hats. While they were of course entitled to kept them in church, they must have blocked a fair bit of the view of the service for those seated behind !
 
#19
Thanks for that, it's quite informative.

I did, however, use the term 'convention' deliberately, and the regs do maintain the distinction between Male & Female although it does give female soldiers the option of removing their head-dress should they wish.

Quote from your link above;

""02.17. Church Parades and Services. Male personnel attending a church service are to remove headdress on entering the church. Female personnel may remove their headdress if they so wish but headdress is to be worn by all personnel forming part of a Colour Party. At formal drumhead services headdress outside, headdress is not to be removed. At informal services in the field, headdress may be removed if circumstances dictate""

Actually I think the hat removal option for ladies is not a bad thing, I saw on a service at Aldershot where European (ie non-Gurkha) female soldiers from the Gurkha Logistics Regiment wearing Terai hats. While they were of course entitled to kept them in church, they must have blocked a fair bit of the view of the service for those seated behind !
A ‘convention’ that is now changing.

Halloumikid
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#20
Don't do what a ******* mong full screw did with at one of the lads funerals after Herrick.

Got so shit faced the night before he almost missed the car down to the service. No 2s were a ******* disgrace, and forgot his ammo boots so only had a pair of beaten Magnums.

He was told in no short order to stay in the ******* car and if he was seen outside it, he was going to get knocked out by the three bar.

Tit.

Otherwise, if it's just you, salute the coffin, and salute at the cheerio music if it's a hot grill and take as much free food and bevvy as you can at the reception - it's what he would have wanted.
 

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