Full Financial Disclosure

Discussion in 'Finance, Property, Law' started by andrew1981, May 8, 2013.

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  1. Jesus, will this ever end?


    I got DIY divorced a year or so ago and have finally thought about getting a clean break with my ex (7 year marriage, 2 children)

    We have been struggling to come to a reasonable agreement between ourselves (trying to protect my pension). Lately though I have had a break through and we have managed to agree an amount I will pay to her to keep her off my pension.

    I have contacted a solicitor to write up this agreement between me and my ex, she has emailed me back asking if we want to do a Full Finiancial Disclosure. It costs an extra £180 an hour to discuss etc etc. Do I need to get one if me and the ex have agreed between ourselves an agreement and will a court accept it?

    If you need more details just ask.

    Thanks in advance
  2. I'm not an expert on law etc however would say pay what ever it costs now to get it all official...for a few hundred/thousand pounds now can save you a fortune at a later date.

    A lad i know did similar to you for the same reasons.....years later when the greedy wench decided she wanted more her solicitor found so many loop holes in their DIY settlement that he got stung big time and said fairwell to a hell of a lot of money. Get it done properly by the solicitors first time is my advice.
    • Like Like x 1
  3. from my experience I looked at diy divorce/on line lawyers but decided to use a local firm of solicitors as the law is a minefield, and things can get messy.When I petitioned for divorce I had to complete a full dislosure of my finances as did my ex wife. It was then down to the court to approve the settlement which was by consent and the trial judge advised in no uncertain terms that because we were not too far apart re maintenance that she expected an agreement and to go away hammer it out and come back.
    If you think that using a solicitor is expensive ask a legal exec to do the work as it works out cheaper on the hourly rate and they tend to be less wet behind the ears. I spent around 6K on legal fees on a straight forward case but the ex wife on legal aid was being deliberately obstructive so costs can build pretty quick
  4. sirbhp

    sirbhp LE Book Reviewer

    ask any Nigerian security night guard , they are mostly legal eagles . ( i aint kidding)
  5. Although most tend to be studying Employment Law, so they can find a way of shafting Whitey :)
  6. **** knows.
  7. My wife and I did a very similar thing - we had an amicable divorce (and are still decent friends). We agreed that she got the house (after 7 years of mortgage paid on it and a bit of equity built up) and I got to keep my pension. We both had a bit of savings and our own cars.
    However we went to a lawyer with strict instructions that this was to be the financial agreement and drawn up so that neither party could benefit any further. We also had him cast an eye over our paperwork for a bit (okay, an eyewatering amount for so little work that was probably done by a clerk on little more than minimum pay) more.

    It meant that we had a clean split with no arguments and things have been friendly ever since then. Worth it and more - if you can both go to the lawyer together and specify exactly what you want. Good luck!
  8. Cold_Collation

    Cold_Collation LE Book Reviewer

    I spent the £200 and went down the Form E/legal rather than voluntary disclosure route. It's a safeguard in that there is sanction if someone is shown to have 'forgotten' to mention assets. There's also a timeline: a maximum of three hearings each three months apart. If you haven't made an agreement by the third, the judge makes decisions for you. The alternative, voluntary disclosure, can go on and on and on (a bit like me).

    Best £200 I ever spent in terms of being able to have an end date to it all and just be able to get on with life.