Fukushima Are the Japs Losing it?

You're right, I'm a mong who didn't read it properly. A 100m cube is 1,000,000 cubic metres, so not far short of 15,000 containers.
However, as any jouno will tell you, the SI unit of volume is the Olympic Swimming Pool.

400 of them. Given the size of the Pacific it seems dilution is the solution.
 
However, as any jouno will tell you, the SI unit of volume is the Olympic Swimming Pool.

400 of them. Given the size of the Pacific it seems dilution is the solution.
How many London double decker buses?
 
Is anyone doing any serious research on transmuting - smashing dangerous isotopes with half lives of thousands or millions of years into ones that have half lives of maybe a decade or two?

I seem to recall seeing a programme in which this was mentioned, and the possibility that nuclear waste could be something that could be made safe with human lifetimes.

Also storing, guarding, and processing would create jobs.
GEC Hitachi have a high flux design, whis is supposed to reduce waste.

PRISM
 
With reference to point 3: I am sure the amount of radiation is falling off now, so the difference between pre nuclear and post nuclear steel is getting less and less.
Apparently this is the case, as the remains of the German ships at Scapa Flow were at one point considered a national strategic resource but no longer. It's still used for super critical applications.
Lead from ancient Roman times has also been used where atmospheric pollutants & radioactivity are an issue.
 
How many London double decker buses?
About 8,889.

According to the scrupulously accurate wikipedia, the UK has 3,555 glowing routemasters parked up.

As our buses are filled with proper, deadly, hairy chested, manly high level waste (and most of them are parked up down the road); and the Jap buses are full of gnat's piss, I'm not exactly shitting bricks TBH.
 
The biggest error was building a Nuclear plant in an earthquake/Tsunami zone.

The UK is free from both of these types of disasters so do I spot a huge export potential.

The stark fact is we need nuclear if we are not to be sitting in the dark and cold further down the line (very possibly the near future) yet what chance do we have when you get the sorts of protest like yesterday in Sussex where that silly tart green MP managed to get herself arrested.
Nope. Just plain wrong. The UK suffers earthquakes, and anywhere can be hit by a tsunami.
 
Nope. Just plain wrong. The UK suffers earthquakes, and anywhere can be hit by a tsunami.
Yes and no. Distance from the edges of tectonic plates and profile of the seabed limits the magnitude of earthquakes and tsunamis that could hit the UK.
 
Yes and no. Distance from the edges of tectonic plates and profile of the seabed limits the magnitude of earthquakes and tsunamis that could hit the UK.
Earthquakes anyway. Given that a tsunami can originate from practically anywhere, I'd doubt there is a limit on how big it can be.

There's a fucktonne of water moves every day due to tides. How much will move with a shove from an earthquake? Or, for instance, the collapse of the canaries?
 
Earthquakes anyway. Given that a tsunami can originate from practically anywhere, I'd doubt there is a limit on how big it can be.

There's a fucktonne of water moves every day due to tides. How much will move with a shove from an earthquake? Or, for instance, the collapse of the canaries?
As I understand it, with a tsunami you get a deep column of water moving across a deep ocean. It's little more than an ocean swell, but moving at a few hundred miles an hour.

Tsunami prone locations need a combination of a really deep ocean that rapidly shelves upwards, and coastal shape also affects it. As the swell hits it rapidly slows down, the water piles up and a BFO wave suddenly rears up out of nowhere when you're sat on your sun lounger. In fact the trough hits first, so the locals know to leg it if the tides starts going out when it shouldn't.

With the UK the sea is fairly shallow, so the BFO wave 'breaks' a relatively long distance offshore, disappating the energy and size of the wave. Never say never with any natural event, and tsunamis have occurred in the UK, but the 30 foot wave and coastline dropping another 5 foot variety aren't considered to occur at anything other than negligible frequency.
 
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Kent and Essex, but only if the SS Montgomery goes bang
Didn't recent reports suggest that its been goign pop and fizzle for a while, and its not caused a large order BOOM yet so its unlikely it will due to the degradation of the high explosive?

Also: the UK has been hit by tsunami's before, but they're so astonishingly rare event its not worth getting to excited about. Wasn't the last one 1604 in Bristol?
 

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