Fukushima Are the Japs Losing it?

#1
Radiation levels in Fukushima bay highest since measurements began - reports — RT News

[h=1]Radiation levels in Fukushima bay highest since measurements began - reports[/h]
BBC News - Fukushima nuclear plant: Radioactive water leak found

Radioactive water has leaked from a storage tank into the ground at Japan's Fukushima plant, its operator says.
Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) said the leak of at least 300 tonnes of the highly radioactive water was discovered on Monday.
Worse than Chernobyl: The inner threat of Fukushima crisis — RT Op-Edge

Probably because it is now clear that the saturation of the ground from all the pumping water for cooling the several reactors and spent fuel pools has destabilized the foundations of the buildings, TEPCO is bringing forward its operation to try and deal with what is perhaps the most dangerous of the four sites, the spent fuel pond of Reactor 4. For this pond contains a truly enormous amount of radioactive material: 1,331 spent fuel grids amounting to 228.3 tons of Uranium and Plutonium buried inside a swimming pool which has already dried out once and exploded
Fukushima is shaping up to be a disaster of biblical proportions.
 
#2
I can't wait to see the footage of a giant, radiation mutated lizard smashing up Tokyo.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
As with all these things, it's neither so bad as the doomsayers try to paint it, nor so good as the Japanese government is trying to spin it. There seem to be two problems here:

-- Get the spent fuel out of the pools and into a safer location.
-- Get the reactors into a state where the fuel can be extracted.

Both are complex problems - but both are potentially do-able. However, I think the old adage of "nothing is foolproof because fools are very ingenious" will prove true again. The best plans in the world have a habit of being screwed up by human error.

Wordsmith
 
#4
From the article:

Readings of tritium in seawater taken from the bay near the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant has shown 4700 becquerels per liter, a TEPCO report stated, according to Nikkei newspaper. It marks the highest tritium level in the measurement history.
The legal limits for Tritium in terms of becquerels per liter vary from country to country. The World Health Organization has a limit of 10,000 Bq/l

This would be Tritium - with a half life 7-14 days.

Yes, a pollution disaster of biblical proportions that lasts weeks, and leaves the water within safe drinking limits throughout - terrible!
 
#5
From the article:






This would be Tritium - with a half life 7-14 days.

Yes, a pollution disaster of biblical proportions that lasts weeks, and leaves the water within safe drinking limits throughout - terrible!
Not so much what it is now but what it has the potential to become.

The japs have been fire-fighting and reacting to events rather than dictating them.

It doesn't instill confidence that this event is going to have a happy ending.
 
#6
Nothing to be concerned about, they have installed a webcam so you can watch the place in real time

[h=1][video]Webcam Fukushima, Japan: Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant[/video][/h]

[video=youtube;H1sS1TmXF38]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1sS1TmXF38[/video]
 
#7
Who ever named the nuclear plant didn't like Shima.
 
#8
The real long term problem is Japanese politicians who will not admit to there being a really big, ugly, expensive problem for the nation.

"All is well. No need to panic. TEPCO have it under control. No need for State involvement."

What is the Japanese for Bollocks?

TEPCO has been given impossible tasks:

1) Bear all cost to sort it out as they had not been properly prepared for the tsunami

2) Return to profitability ASAP through cost savings and "restructuring" to repay the state aid they have already got.

Currently estimated that it will cost around $15Bn over next 5 years to deal with the disaster. TEPCO will be bankrupt within a year unless it gets unconditional State aid or the State takes over the running of the clean up.

So currently work is being done but nobody is going to sign up the big long term contracts needed until it is clear who will foot the bill if TEPCO goes under.

TEPCO are getting some state money but most of that is going into building a barrier of frozen soil to try and isolate the contaminated groundwater but that is untested on the scale required. And it is going to cost huge amounts in terms of energy to keep it frozen for errrr.... a long time.
 
#9
The biggest error was building a Nuclear plant in an earthquake/Tsunami zone.

The UK is free from both of these types of disasters so do I spot a huge export potential.

The stark fact is we need nuclear if we are not to be sitting in the dark and cold further down the line (very possibly the near future) yet what chance do we have when you get the sorts of protest like yesterday in Sussex where that silly tart green MP managed to get herself arrested.
 
#10
Not so much what it is now but what it has the potential to become.
They had a tsunami that killed 20,000 people

A few years ago a tsunami in the Indian ocean killed 250,000 people and left over a million homeless

Lets get a sense of proportion when we talk about 'biblical' disasters, and stop thinking that raising the statistical likelihood of lifetime cancer of a few thousand people by a couple of percent (cf. Chernobyl) is the new apocalypse, especially given the amount of radioactive material that is emitted annually by coal fired power stations!
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
The biggest error was building a Nuclear plant in an earthquake/Tsunami zone.

The UK is free from both of these types of disasters so do I spot a huge export potential.

The stark fact is we need nuclear if we are not to be sitting in the dark and cold further down the line (very possibly the near future) yet what chance do we have when you get the sorts of protest like yesterday in Sussex where that silly tart green MP managed to get herself arrested.
Japan was hit by a tsunami almost unprecedented in scale that overwhelmed flood defenses. Add in a bit of stupidity like putting the back up generators where they will get flooded if the flood defenses are overwhelmed and you get Fukushima. The whole of Japan is an earthquake/tsunami zone, so most nuclear plants are at some form of risk of other.

The sort of nuclear we want is fusion not fission, as that will generate far less radioactive waste. But we're 20 - 50 years away from that, so need to frack to fill the gap. Developing a hydrogen economy would help as well - we've just got to spend the next couple of decades working out why assorted bacteria can crack water into hydrogen and oxygen with minimal energy requirements.

Wordsmith
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
#14
Wordsmith, we've been within 20 to 50 years of attaining nuclear fusion for the last 50 years at least. I suspect that the reason for the lack of progress is that fusion reactors can't be used to supply weapons grade material.

The Japanese government have been in denial about the situation ever since the earthquake struck, they would probably deny that large green radioactive fire breathing lizards exist as the big lizard stomped Tokyo flat.


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#16
This would be Tritium - with a half life 7-14 days.

Yes, a pollution disaster of biblical proportions that lasts weeks, and leaves the water within safe drinking limits throughout - terrible!
Tritium half life is 12.32 years. You're thinking of the biological half life (time to excrete it from the body), which is a week or two, depending on how much beer you drink (no kidding, beer is the recommended treatment for tritium exposure).
 
#17
Wordsmith, we've been within 20 to 50 years of attaining nuclear fusion for the last 50 years at least. I suspect that the reason for the lack of progress is that fusion reactors can't be used to supply weapons grade material.
That's part of the reason - the world budget has been a few tens of millions a year so far. The other part is the huge technical challenge involved - the temperature needed is ~10 times that at the centre of the sun, and a whole new set of technologies needed to be developed.

Fusion v. Moores Law may be interesting to show the rate of progress historically.
 
#18
Tuna's 25,000-mile swim down marine highway - Telegraph

Tuna have a migration route right across the Pacific..

Most of our tuna comes from the Atlantic or Indian Ocean with most US tuna coming from the Pacific. Yanks now want Atlantic tuna.

Interestingly, in recent weeks my local Tesco and Sainsburys have begun selling some tinned tuna with a Pacific branding - most expensive tinned tuna in the shops IMPO a good pound or two more expensive - but interesting how it has just begun to show up in UK supermarkets is it not?

I think the consensus is that Fukushima has already melted down, and the cores are undergound.
 
#19
Tuna's 25,000-mile swim down marine highway - Telegraph

Tuna have a migration route right across the Pacific..

Most of our tuna comes from the Atlantic or Indian Ocean with most US tuna coming from the Pacific. Yanks now want Atlantic tuna.

Interestingly, in recent weeks my local Tesco and Sainsburys have begun selling some tinned tuna with a Pacific branding - most expensive tinned tuna in the shops IMPO a good pound or two more expensive - but interesting how it has just begun to show up in UK supermarkets is it not?

I think the consensus is that Fukushima has already melted down, and the cores are undergound.
Thanks for that. I bought some tins of tuna last night, unknown brand, 69p a tin, sitting on shelves next to Princes tuna at £1 a tin.

Just checked the labels. Yep, "caught in the Pacific".

Hey ho. Gotta die of something, right? :lol:
 
#20
Thanks for that. I bought some tins of tuna last night, unknown brand, 69p a tin, sitting on shelves next to Princes tuna at £1 a tin.

Just checked the labels. Yep, "caught in the Pacific".

Hey ho. Gotta die of something, right? :lol:
You could be lucky and mutate into something unspeakably grotesque?
 

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