FTSE: 8000 by year end?

With bl**dy Brexit keeping the FTSE in a trading range, I hope and expect that once some kind of decision is made, the markets can get to work again.

I noted Citigroup mentioned this recently: I'm more of a fan of Midcaps but I do get the feeling this could happen...

 
With bl**dy Brexit keeping the FTSE in a trading range, I hope and expect that once some kind of decision is made, the markets can get to work again.

I noted Citigroup mentioned this recently: I'm more of a fan of Midcaps but I do get the feeling this could happen...

Don't you think that is going to depend on the outcome of the Brexit Panto?

Best case scenario the market and the economy go into overdrive, the sky fairies smile upon you all and life is wonderful.
Worst case scenario it tanks, and you have some very lean years ahead of you and a lost decade to look forward to.

Most likely scenario is that the whole ordeal drags on, nobody wants to invest in the UK and you just bleed out slowly because the investment climate is to risky to mess with.
 

MrMemory

War Hero
The FTSE has barely moved from its peak in the dot com boom of 1998, way before Brexit was a gleam in Nigel's eye. Bad news for people like me who invested 15k back then which has only just doubled in value - mainly thanks to re-investing dividends.


To break 8000 it would have to increase by 11.5% between now and the end of the year. Possible but unlikely IMHO.

Screen Shot 2019-10-21 at 20.05.13.png
 
With bl**dy Brexit keeping the FTSE in a trading range, I hope and expect that once some kind of decision is made, the markets can get to work again.

I noted Citigroup mentioned this recently: I'm more of a fan of Midcaps but I do get the feeling this could happen...

There are also plenty of others who say that a Stock Market crash is not too far away, which is why I cashed in and converted to pension this year.

Pays yer money and takes yer chances.

( The value of your investment could go down as well as up )

The last sentence in @MrMemory attachment is most appropriate.
 
There are also plenty of others who say that a Stock Market crash is not too far away, which is why I cashed in and converted to pension this year.

Pays yer money and takes yer chances.

( The value of your investment could go down as well as up )

The last sentence in @MrMemory attachment is most appropriate.
When you say you've converted to pension, do you mean you've purchased an annuity?
 
Had this brief from a fund manager, can't say who for Compliance reasons.

UK based readers; you’ve got 13 days to take advantage of the mighty pound’s resurgence, head to continental climes and enjoy the fact that you can take the fast queues at passport control. No doubt many people could do with a holiday in the midst of all of this political chaos and posturing.
As far as we are concerned though, while it’s hard – if not downright foolish – to make sure-fire predictions about the outcome of all of this, there is plenty of nuance to be extracted from the noise. The most notable of which is the sheer weight of capital that has clearly been waiting in the wings for any sign of an improvement in the UK’s political situation. With a world of opportunity to choose from, global investors don’t need to hold assets in sterling or invest in UK stocks - and indeed both have been largely shunned in recent years - but as we have seen in the last few weeks; many want to, they just need more certainty to do so.
The reason investors look favourably on the UK whenever there is increased certainty around a deal is because it is home to so many extraordinary businesses; companies that have weathered an incredibly difficult environment and still managed to be profitable, to invest in research and development, and to adapt not only to weaker economic conditions - but to systemic changes in their own industries. The death of the UK high street has been much discussed, but there is a wealth of opportunity being seized by dynamic companies that are finding new and innovative ways to engage with consumers online. Many of these companies have been trading at a discount to their global peers because of their locality, not their innate properties as businesses. It will be very interesting to see just how favourably the rest of the world looks on UK firms should we have some clarity over Brexit.
 
I follows some shares that I have - all UK £ earners, it is true that $ earning companies have propped up the UK indices, and £ earners may be the beneficiaries of any Brexit bounce, if such a thing should materialise. The UK banks have virtually stagnated for a decade despite QE and money circulating in the system.

My limited observation are the UK has been bumping along for the past decade (partially blind sided by Brexit)

Low interest rates have facilitated that bumping along, I hold the belief that there are lots of companies out there in the general economy that are a couple of days bad trading away from bankruptcy and if interest rates rise will fold.

The general public are still surviving albeit on credit - house prices in my location are still on the upward trend and there are quite a few personalised reg plates on contract finance new cars

My theory is that QE was introduced by the Global Governmental Banks / Treasuries to stabilises economies and give the politicians / governments time to bring in strategic policies to stimulate growth, the politicians / governments has sat back and thought that QE was the answer ? sooner or later it will all start to unravel

Looks like there will not be a Brexit bounce in the FTSE this year then

Archie
 
I still prefer FTSE 250 stocks anyway.
No real doubt that, over time, shares are the best mainstream investment to protect against inflation.
 
With the UK narrowly avoiding a recession at the end of Q3, I would not bank on a massive raise of either indices

Archibald
 

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