Frozen Shoulder - Help needed

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by mussolini93, Jun 20, 2005.

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  1. I've had a frozen shoulder for six months now. ( Caused by a heavy lap top bag - how humiliating ! ) How much longer do I have to put up with it ? Some of you must have had the same problem lugging GPMG or big heavy things about. Any tips on how to treat it etc. will be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. 850W microwave for 10 minutes. Take out, stir then a further 5 minutes on full power.
     
  3. Ok, a few years ago I had this prob.
    What worked for me was the Acuhealth electro- acupuncture system.

    Using battery power, the pulses of energy freed up my shoulder after 3 treatments and
    believe me to go from an almost stuck shoulder to full movement is amazing.

    The down side was Boots were selling them for £145 ish and that was 8 years ago.

    Yep, you can say it's in the mind, but it worked for me.

    If this doesn't interest you then how about someone who specialises in sports injuries?
     
  4. NHS - doctor - physio??
     
  5. He, wifeys down with this for the second time at the moment. The Docs recommended NSAID (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) and gentle exercise. Immobilising it is the worst possible. Deffo needs attention forn the Doc though to avoid the chance it could be other more serious conditions.

    Alternatively tenderise the area daily with a lump hammer.
     
  6. Hot shower on affected area for five minutes, then cold as poss for two minutes, back to hot for about 30 secs, have a w*nk with opposite hand to affected shoulder.






    Might take your mind off it for a bit.............................. 8O
     
  7. I didn't try the last part when my back muscles were in spasm, but I did the hot and cold malarkey periodically for 3 years before the medics admitted there was an alternative. Diazepan, commonly known as valium, was used as a muscle relaxant before people starting using it an anti-depressant. Medics are really wary of giving it to you in case you become a junkie or zombie, but I found it ideal for a muscular back problem, and I have carried some with me when travelling for the best part of 20 years now.

    As to the regime, well, how can I put this. Under no circumstances should you try to persuade your medic to prescribe the 10mg tablets (which are blue) rather than the 2mg ones he or she would prefer to give you. Never, ever, take them with alcohol (such as a large glass of wine), before collapsing in agony onto your bed, only to wake after 12 to 18 hours sleep (close to coma and with absolutely no pain), to find that the muscle giving you the problem has completely relaxed and you are able to get up and move around normally, and to start exercising it. When quizzed later, declare the other medic/nurse/physio was right all along, and that alternate hot and cold treatments and 4 weeks in bed was obviously the way forward.

    Good luck, and if you start to do something like this more than once every 6 to 12 months, then check you're not one of those the medics worry about with diazepan.

    Don
     
  8. Connect sparks plugs from a regular car battery to your bollocks then run currant through them till the pain fades.
     
  9. My mate Ivan's "frozen shoulder" turned out to be a malignant tumour in his left lung.

    Top funeral.
     
  10. LOL
     
  11. The longer these things go on for, the harder it is to sort. 6 months is quite a long time, I think you should try to follow some of the (more helpful) advice ASAP.

    Good luck
     
  12. Thanks to everyone who posted useful advice. I have been trying the NSAIDs for some time and things do seem to be getting better on the pain front. The mobility is the real bummer. I can just about reach the Heil Hitler position and no further. ( Hey maybe Adolf had one too ? ) I would see my doctor, only he is a useless cnut and will only tell me to wait for a few more weeks then come back and see him again. ( As this is his answer to everything )
     
  13. I've treated numerous frozen shoulder cases and the profile is roughly this:
    6 months getting grim, 6 months staying grim, 6 months getting better - hard luck.
    If it is a true frozen shoulder there really are no quick fixes as this is all to do with cross fibres binding in the shoulder capsule and they take time to remodel. Conservative care is physio stuff such as a hot flanel on the shoulder whilst doing range of motion exercises (and there's many of these - talk to a physio) etc.
    Get somone (Osteopath/Chiropractor) to look at your neck as well - I know, I know, you're thinking its my bloody shoulder, but I have never met a patient who's had a frozen shoulder who hasn't had a knackered neck and they are linked.

    Take loads of cartilage supporting nutrients - the jury's out on if they really help but at least the body has them if it needs to use them.

    And avoid anyone with an injection as this will only take the pain away but will not sort out the underlying problem. Have nothing to do with NSAID unless you first ask the Doc to tell you exactly how many people died last year through taking NSAIDS because the number is impressive. If you are unhappy about his answer search a bit on the web.
     
  14. A physio is definately the best person to work out what the problem is and sort it out - get yourself referred.
     
  15. but make sure it is a physio who knows what they are doing.
    6 mths getting worse, 6 mths going nowhere and 6 mths getting better is the accepted wisdom (but as always - remember the Ardennes and treat accepted wisdom with care)
    and if you don't get on with your MO - where's the next nearest? Someone needs to confirm that it is a frozen shoulder, refer you, record progress etc etc ad nauseum .. and you can see other MOs