Front and Rear Facing Beret?

#1
I was having a conversation with a mate at my TAC and got talking about capbadges and berets (amazing what a few beers can do) and he mentioned a beret which has a capbadge front and rear. Could anyone enlighten me to the validity of this and if it is indeed true why? Any help appreciated.
 
#3
The former The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry, now part of 1 RIFLES, if memory serves me. I'm not sure why they have two, it's just something I seem to recall Dad telling me!
 
#10
stabandswat said:
I was having a conversation with a mate at my TAC and got talking about capbadges and berets (amazing what a few beers can do) and he mentioned a beret which has a capbadge front and rear. Could anyone enlighten me to the validity of this and if it is indeed true why? Any help appreciated.
The reverse badge originates from the Gloucestershire regiment 'glorious glosters' and also known as back to back boys. During the battle of the Nile the French attempted to attack the Regt from the rear whilst they were engaged from the front. The order was given for the rear rank to about face and fire at the French cavalry which broke the assault.

The sphinx was added to the capbadge as well as a battle honour and a badge in miniature was worn initially on the reverse of the high collar, later adopted on the head dress when it changed.

The tradition was carried forward through the amalgamations into the Rifles of today.
 
#12
Am sure there's some ex or serving from the Gloucestershire Regt that could fill you in on details.

I know that the front cap badge was about the size of a mess tin.

BT.
 
#13
I think it was out in Egypt during Napoleon's time when the Gloucester were surrounded and were fighting in all directions they were awarded the right to wear two cap badges front and rear of their hat. The one to the rear was only the fraction of the size to one in the front, This award was carried on even when they wore the Beret. also the they where one of the few British Regiments that have been awarded the American Presidential colours to carry on their Regimental colours.
 
#14
Later pattern RGBW capbadges were quite a bit smaller than the old dinner plate ones.

On amalgamation into the Rifles they lost the Brandywine flash behind the capbadge but kept the rear facing badge
 
#15
.... In common with all other egiments who had faught in Egypt, including of course, the 61st, they were granted the special honour of bearing the Sphinx and the word"Egypt" on their colours. But in common with no other regiment, the 28th were also granted the unique privilege of wearing the regimental number on the back of their head-dress as as well as on the front, a perpetual reminder of the ocassion when the two ranks had faught back to back at Alexandia on March the 21st.

Daniell, D.S. (1951): Cap of Honour: The Storey of The Gloucestershire Regiment (The 28th / 61st Foot), White Lion Publishers, London.
 
#16
Sorry I forgot to add the quote can be found on page 84.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
I think only the former RGBWLI companies of 6 & 7 Rifles wear the back badge on the beret now. 1 Rifles and possibly the rest wear it on their no 2 dress.
 
#18
'Neither Kings nor Queens or Royal Marines. Brass Before and Brass Behind. Old Braggs'

The 28th of Foot

At the end of the day at the Battle of Albuera, 16th May 1811, only two officers of the 28th remained alive.

After eating a sparse meal together that evening in an orchard, the senior of the two stood up and addressed the junior:

"The King, Mister Vice"

The junior of the two replied "The King, Mister President".

The two of them drank the loyal toast.

I was delighted to learn some years ago the tradition was still observed in the Mess on Albuera Day, with the Mess President and the junior officer present drinking the loyal toast together before the assembled company then rose to drink it.

I would be glad to know the correct version of that toast, and if it is still observed today. I would like to think it is.
 

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