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from Old English White to green moss and rust

the front pipe brackets lay flat awaiting a 90' bend upward to receive the front flexible hose, and the pipe.
front brake cable brackets flat.png

bent upward. the pipe is the shortest in the kit, needs an S bend to get it to the bracket.
front brake cable brackets raised.png
 
the front pipes installed, just the flexible hoses to join them up.
brake pipes fitted front.png

the rear pipe is a different story, it just can't reach, I'm unwilling to pop it out of that clip up front and allow the pipe to drape over the gearbox front end, I could put a bend in it to keep it from rubbing I guess.
rear pipe almost there.png
 
the brake pipes connected to the rear flexible hoses,
rear pipe cross over to join.png

the flexible area takes care of any movement by the suspension swing axle.
flexible hose female  both ends.png

the pipe crossing over the gearbox, I placed a bend in it to bridge over the gearbox vibration, might cover that with a rubber tube to protect it from chafing.
brake pipe crossover piece.png
 
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I refitted the rear hubs using the existing seals and O rings, big mistake, no sooner had I filled the 4.4pints back in the gearbox, the oil ran down the swing arms, out of the rubber seal and down the backing plate between the shoes (the shoes were still dry, as the car is static) down the brake adjusters and out through the bottom of the drum. So off it all came again. and watched this excellent instruction video, and re fitted the new hub seals, gaskets and o rings.

This time I re filled the oil before refitting the brakes, I'll place some newspaper down there, but so far so good, the hubs are dry as a bone, this time.
oil in sand but no leak.png
 
cleaning up the steering column using a wire brush in my angle grinder, leaves this strong, but pitted surface, turned jet black by the Krust treatment, this reminds me, I might do another musket restoration after this is finished.
foot of column.png


the brakes and wheels reassembled, new clean newspaper at the foot of the tyres to show any drips.
oily tyres.png
 
with the flexible hoses fitted to the front, that is the brake system fully installed.
front hoses fitted.png

only two additions left to make them operational, some fluid and a brake bleeding kit, plus a brake light switch for the final outlet on the master cylinder.
front brakes gv.png

so on with some de rusting of the bump stops. this one has the rubber part fitted.
bump stop not in the dip.png

as I can't get the wire brush inside there, into the electro dip it goes.
bump stop in the dip.png
 
The rubber bump stop pulls off the metal bracket, there's a mushroom shaped fitting on the bracket that the bump stop stretches over to hold it in place, the mushroom on the bracket can rust out, I've had it happen to me a couple of times
 
The rubber bump stop pulls off the metal bracket, there's a mushroom shaped fitting on the bracket that the bump stop stretches over to hold it in place, the mushroom on the bracket can rust out, I've had it happen to me a couple of times

thanks for that piece of helpful information, I was going to order a rubber top for this bump stop, but by what you say I may as well buy a full one for £18, I would have not been able to fit it as the mushroom has rusted off as you describe.
bump stop scrap.png
 
I've seen it a few times, think what happens is water pools in the bottom and rusts it out unseen until it's too late to deal with the rust
yes binned the right hand one and ordered a replacement, the restored left side one bolted up on the chassis.
bump stop fitted left.png

the front shock absorbers arrive this morning, and a slight hitch was found, in that I'd left the metal bushes on both bottom mounting pins. they were stuck hard and had to be ground off.
metal bush that needs removing.png

problems, are just situations awaiting to be overcome, off came the bushes, and on bolted the shocks.
front shocks fitted.png
 
box of parts arrived today, first bolted up, the right side bump stop.
bump stop fitted right side rear.png

the rear shock absorbers were next, the mounting bolts were in need of some TLC,
cleaning threads b.png

die cutter to clean out the threads. Simply by turning the bolt through it the threads come out cleanly defined. Applied some copper slip and they bolted up smoothly after this.
cleaning threads.png
 
the left side rear shock absorber in position.
rear shock fitted.png

then the brake switch bolted into the master brake cylinder. It's great when all you are doing is bolting on new bits. It feels like a giant Meccano set.
brake switch fitted.png


now comes a snag, how to fit the body to chassis rubber gasket. Chris Vallone screws his down with self tappers.
floor pan gasket a.png
 
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I would be wary of chucking copper slip all over the place.
I used to work with a guy that built his own Caterham. The emperor told him to coat every thread with the stuff so nothing would sieze up in the future.
He said that he spent more time underneath it re tightening bolts than driving it.
It was so bad he got rid.
 
I would be wary of chucking copper slip all over the place.
I used to work with a guy that built his own Caterham. The emperor told him to coat every thread with the stuff so nothing would sieze up in the future.
He said that he spent more time underneath it re tightening bolts than driving it.
It was so bad he got rid.
cheers I'll bare that in mind, locktight may be the way to go on some bolts. if not replace some of the more essentials one's with nylocks.
 
the floor gasket. looking around the internet, mark out drill holes and apply sealant and lay down the gasket, seems to be the way to go, it was way easier than I was expecting.
gasket floor to body b.png

the gasket cuts cleanly with a pair of kitchen scissors. The bolts through the Napoleon's hat were withdrawn and holes drilled through the gasket for the bolts to go through.
gasket floor to body c.png

the gasket curving over the napoleon hat.
gasket floor to body d.png
 
the curve at the back was the only sticking point, but even that was easy to overcome using masking tape to hold it in the curve while the sealant hardens off.
gasket floor to body a.png

Now all I have to do is leave it alone, don't fiddle or faff, make final adjustments and close the workshop door and go and do something else, (like my Model Sunderland flying boat I've been neglecting over on the scale models thread.)
It'll soon be time to lower the body on top to make room for the engine restoration.
gasket floor to body aa.png
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I would be wary of chucking copper slip all over the place.
I used to work with a guy that built his own Caterham. The emperor told him to coat every thread with the stuff so nothing would sieze up in the future.
He said that he spent more time underneath it re tightening bolts than driving it.
It was so bad he got rid.
Lubricated threads (that aren't meant to be) can also lead to over-torquing of the fasteners. There's nothing wrong with putting an anti-sieze compound on bolt shanks, personally, i'd never put it on threads unless specified, even then, I wouldn't use copperslip for anything but wheel hubs. For threads, a nice, thin machine oil is best.
 
with the Chassis all done, it's time to get the engine out for a look.
engine moved out.png

plenty to do here, the chassis will be brought back in so It'll need space around the engine to strip it all down.
engine moved out b small image.png

engine moved out c small image space around it png.png
 
placing a large adjustable on the pulley wheel nut and gave a heave and the unit turned, very encouraging, I couldn't get it to move last winter, a stay in-doors has done it good.
stuck band.png

once it gave a full rotation, the fan belt stuck, no problem, that's going binward anyway.
stuck band close up.png
 

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