from Old English White to green moss and rust

Caps back on, bolted up with the cleaned up rubber spacer inside
left side encap completed.png

the right one needed a smaller diameter fourth bolt, but all bolted up nice and tight.
right side end cap completed.png
 
tie rod ends now.
new tie rod end b.png

glad I took this now, it's 11mm of clear thread.
tie rod thread number scaled..png

the old one prior to dismantling last month.
tie rod end old  prior to dismantling.png
 
Through my eyes that doesn't look to bad, I've rebuilt cars much worse than that,
I'd have given my right B--------- for that:)
funny thing about the Moggy Pickup, at the time they were considered an expendable item, now, if you look after one they run and run. Keep you eye's open, one will come along. Restored one's go for daft money though.
Here's mine rapidly coming to the end of it's restoration in 2009
overhead final stages.jpg


the VW tie rod ends fitted up and ready to go on the front of the chassis.
new fitted tie rod ends.png
 

anglo

LE
funny thing about the Moggy Pickup, at the time they were considered an expendable item, now, if you look after one they run and run. Keep you eye's open, one will come along. Restored one's go for daft money though.
Here's mine rapidly coming to the end of it's restoration in 2009
View attachment 497106

the VW tie rod ends fitted up and ready to go on the front of the chassis.
View attachment 497104
Keep your eye's open, one will come along.

My time for such things is past, I'm getting a bit long in the tooth,
the mind can hack it, the body can't
Modern cars are just a box to get about in, no character at all,
It's nice to see people rebuilding and keeping the old cars going
I watch your thread with interest, maybe it will encourage others
to show their work on old machines not just cars
The bloke next door has bought a 1/6 model German tank, he's shown me all the bits,
all aluminium, lovely job, this frecking virus has stopped me giving him a hand.
Sorry for the thread wobble

Screenshot_2020-08-14 1 6th Scale Metal Model Armour Kits Tanks and other vehicles.png
 
Sorry for the thread wobble

no worries mate, understand about being in a position to do one, It takes a lot of time, space and some money, not a bank emptier, as you buy what you need over time, but the physical strain is the biggest ask from a project. I was keeping an eye out for a pickup for you, but someone else might be interested, it's got "Nobby" wheels and a homemade bed, so needs lots of parts to put it back to factory spec, rather a lot asked for it, but I guess it runs ok.
Morris Minor Pick Up 1970 | eBay
 
pretty hum drum and routine aspect of the restoration, stripping, cleaning, painting and re-assembling bits and pieces, starting with a rear brake backing plate. The springs and spacer bar are out, next to come out are the shoes.
brake backing with parts in box.png

the shoe springs, how do they come out.
brake shoe retaining spring.png
 
some cleaning and Krust on the gearbox rear cradle piece, bolted back on loose so it can come off again when the gearbox goes back on.
gearbox rear cradle cleaned up and bolted on..png

the rear frame head box that contains the gear lever linkage, this is located under the rear seat on an assembled car, may as well krust in there, as far as I can, while it's exposed with the body off.
rear frame hewad interior.png
 

anglo

LE
Sorry for the thread wobble

no worries mate, understand about being in a position to do one, It takes a lot of time, space and some money, not a bank emptier, as you buy what you need over time, but the physical strain is the biggest ask from a project. I was keeping an eye out for a pickup for you, but someone else might be interested, it's got "Nobby" wheels and a homemade bed, so needs lots of parts to put it back to factory spec, rather a lot asked for it, but I guess it runs ok.
Morris Minor Pick Up 1970 | eBay
I've never paid more than £300 for any car that I've bought to rebuild,
mind you I've had some real bargains, people wanting to get rid
 
what do we call this process, Electrolysis or electro plating? dunno, but it's good at turning rust back into usable material, only limited to the size that will fit in a bowl of water with some caustic soda in it, red on the sacrificial piece of scrap, black on the piece you want to save/improve/derust.
ELECTRLYSIS USING A BATY CHARGER FRONT.png

you can see tiny bubbles emitting from the edge of the rusty brake backing plate. making sure they don't come into contact with one another or a fuse will blow in the battery charger.
Electrolysis bubbles from the  process.png
 
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the brake shoes wiped over with brake parts cleaner, I'll be replacing the slave cylinders, but everything else will be reused.
brake parts in red tray.png


the back plate came out of the bowl with a slimy layer of rust and grease, this wiped off with a dry rag and some brake parts cleaner fluid, here it is with a brushing of krust,, hung up to dry off.
back plate in krust.png
 
a couple of hours and out came the backing plate, the loose surface dirt, rust and greasy is ready to be sloughed off with a old rag, leaving a nice solid surface.
electro slough backplate.png

in goes the pedals, but only the pivot bar fits in one go, this will have to be done in two sessions.
electro foot pedals.png

the water needs changing as it's the colour of mud, rust and grease. Bubble bubble toil and trouble free.
electro foot pedals close up .png
 
when the water is full of debris it seems to work better, allowing the current to flow more efficiently
dirty water works better.png

the pedals clean and jet black, ready for re-assembly
pedals cleaned up and jet black.png
 
done all the small brake parts, saving the largest and heaviest till last, the drums
drum in the bowl a.png


it's so large I need to top up the fluid level to cover the rim.
drum in the bowl b.png

about 24 hours in the bowl for each drum, maybe longer.
three drums under the bench.png
 
Amazingly patient work ! I'm curious if all the internal voids in the bodywork were originally painted with something or other? I'd expect the whole body to be rust if it wasn't, but I remember the old Zebart (? spelling) rust-proofing procedure that added a bit to secondhand car prices all those years ago. And what state are those brake linings in, not to mention asbestos and so on! Presumably you will get them relined, or just buy new ones? It's surprising to see how much hand work is involved in replacing all the rusty steel with new. Steel is handy stuff (if it isn't rusted away, of course).
 
the ball joints next, I've been compiling a list of parts to order from The Heritage Centre at Shoreham By sea, they are out of a lot of stuff, so I ordered what they had on my list and got the rest on e bay, a bit more as post is free if you order over £50 from VW Heritage, so another look at the ball joints, they look in servicable condition, but their rubber dust covers are split on all four.
rubber dust cap removal e.png

this is an instant failure, as grease gets out and road dirt gets in. So off they came, cut open with snippers.
rubber dust cap removal a.png
 
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