from Old English White to green moss and rust

re fitted some mig wire and continued to weld on the right floor pan, spluttering and noisy is how I'd describe the new wire. But no white residue?
Strong but far from neat welds.
rear of floor, rough weld.png

re checking the packaging the wire I purchased from my local Halfords branch, MIG, Mild steel, 0.8mm, but no mention of gassless flux cored wire, my mistake, what a misguided purchase.
sip wir packaging.png
 
With all the massive amount of work that you have put in to restore that bug, I would really recommend that you get the paint finish put on by someone who knows exactly what they are doing.
With all due respect, you have some remarkable skills , but years of splashing paint over old motors does make a huge difference.
It is worth the investment.
 
With all the massive amount of work that you have put in to restore that bug, I would really recommend that you get the paint finish put on by someone who knows exactly what they are doing.
With all due respect, you have some remarkable skills , but years of splashing paint over old motors does make a huge difference.
It is worth the investment.
what! and miss out on all the fun, no way. I'm doing all of this, and the only thing I'm paying someone else to do is the Re-commisioning MOT so I can get it re registered for road use and off the SORN. Stick around, I'm posting all of it here.

the next step is rather not worth sharing in any detail,I have the welding of the left side floor pan, the yellow marker shows the length of the weld.
weld trace.png
 
in the meantime an amazing workshop time lapse video with great sound to keep your mech soul up and pumped
 
the floor is welded and painted, I'm dead pleased with it.
floor finished and painted.png


and when that is dry, it'll be time to take a look at this....
and now for the gear box.png
 
first step, wheel off, get it level on axle stands.
gearbox nearly ready.png

the starter motor was next, but one retaining stud is missing, put that on the shopping list.
starter motor empty mount.png

quick check over, seems ok, the teeth don't look worn, time to look at this in detail later on.
starter motor out.png

the handbrake linkages were disconnected next then the little access hatch was opened for access to the gearbox gear change link.
gearbox coupling.png
 
after a short break as the penetrating oil erm, penetrates, sorted a nice box for the brake drum and associated components.
axle and brake parts box.png
 
first off, the hub nut, on with the wheel, jammed with a tire lever to stop it turning, off it came with a few taps.
taking off the hub nut.png

next stage was a bitch, the seized drum, a long period with a lump hammer and cold chisel. eventually off it came.
removing the brake drum.png
 
Victory today! gearbox out. not that there wasn't casualties, the third nut was determined to be a victim of the nut splitter.
cut retaing bolt.png

there is freedom in saying sod you then, take the cutting disc. once the three bolts were out, and all the lines disconnected, the swing axle came free.
freeing the rear offside right side axle b.png
 
the drum was seized tight, even after freeing off the adjusters, they aren't as easy to free off as Moggie ones. but off came both drums, this then allows the handbrake line to be unbolted and freed up, but the left baking plate can come off later, too close to the wall to work it.
left rear brake back plaste still on.png


it's a joy when a plan comes together. out came the gearbox and attached swing arms.
seperate gearbox a.png

it's a heavy lump of metal, not just a gear box but the integral differential too.
Not to mention the swing arms, it's like carrying a overweight emu.
gearbox on work table.png

up on the table ready for a clean up, and the empty bearing arms are free for a clean up and repaint too.
empty gearbox bearings b.png
 
out in the sunshine for a scrub down and pressure wash.
pressure washing the gearbox c.png

scrubbing and washing using various cleaning products to loosen and blast off the accumulated muck. looked nice after, and I can touch it with bare hands and not get a covered in grease.
pressure washing the gearbox f.png

this was ten mil deep in dirt.
pressure washing the gearbox d.png
 
I can see steel inside the starter motor housing now.
pressure washing the gearbox e.png

started cleaning off the same sort of muck off the bearing arms getting them ready for a coat of paint.
cleaned bearing arms.png
 
With the starter motor mounting, it's not a missing stud, it's a long m10 bolt with a half moon head, bit of a pain to fit so often left out
 
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