from Old English White to green moss and rust

so the new front beam is out of the picture, it belongs to an earlier model up to 1965, after that the beam height changed from 7 to 8 inches and VW introduced ball joints, so the new beam won't fit onto the frame head as the bolt holes won't line up. One of those things you learn as you go.

so out came the Torsion bars from the, lets call the original beam, the ball joint beam. out they came in a sticky greasy blob, but because of the grease they area s good as new.
torsion bars coverewd in grease.png

the inside of the tubes are similarly in great condition, as they are gloopped up in grease.
ball beam.png
 
I'm going to do what I said I wouldn't, that is try to repair the ball beam with welding, it's the web joint between the outer tubes and the shock tower that's suffered all the rust damage. here the first cardboard template is offered up for correction.
card template number 1.png


the marked out on scrap steel
card template number 1 on metal.png


and welded in, this weld is only part done, there's more to be done lower left.
template 1 welded in.png
 
I'm quite enjoying this welding into thick steel for a change. Quite different from welding thin body panels together, the chances of blowing holes is zero, so I'm one click from the hottest welding setting.
front beam welding bottom corner.png
 
the drivers side of the beam welded up and finished.
wedling on drivers side completed b.png


using grinding and flap discs to smooth it all out and shape it. Then a coat of garage door paint to stop the bare steel rust flashing.
wedling on drivers side completed.png
 
that's the worst area of rust damage fixed, now for the last rust hole, and it's cardboard template held up as a test fit before I cut it out in steel.
card template number 2 on metal.png
 
the repair piece welded in.
latest repair welded in.png


now to grind down the welds and smooth it all over with a flap disc.
latest repair smoothed off and painted black.png

It's all bare shiney silver steel at that stage, so needs a coat of hard wearing black to stop it rusting over.
just the hole in the shock tower to do now. I've been on the phone to VW Heritage part centre, it's now a two week delay for parts orders, gone are the heady next day deliveries. no problem, I'll just order two weeks before I need items.
 
and finally, you'll be glad to hear, the last repair inside the shock tower. That completes the repairs to the front beam. Now then, what's next?
and finally.png


before I rebolt the front beam to the frame head, I have that lower edge to repair, a long thin slat welded in there will seal it up and prevent water and road grit getting in there and rusting the frame head from the inside out.
frame head front lower edge next.png
 
clearer shot of the job to be done. the edges cleared off with a sanding disc.
frame head head end plate post clean b.png


welded in a three piece lower edge to the frame head.
frame head front lower edge welded in.png


ground to shape and painted black, that's the frame head finally finished, when the paint is dry I can bolt up the repaired front beam.
frame head finished.png
 
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so with the front beam bolted up, the torsion bars were next, after a hour of no success, I took a break and watched this.

on the surface a simple "how to" video, but like a coin dropping into a jukebox and Tom Jones coming on singing Green green grass, it all fitted up ok.
torsion bars returned b png.png
 
phew, done, I can move on. I did make it worse for myself by noticing, once I finally fitted the first one, I had the dimple on the wrong side, so out it had to come, and the who tiresome business had to be done again. Still, they are fitted, Finally.
torsion bars returned a.png
 
fitting the steering box back on
steering box replaced a.png

when I took it off I took note of the position of the butt stops, they are adjustable on the end of a threaded rod, I've not adjusted them, so I can use them now as a datum point for the steering box bolts.
steering box replaced b.png

and the other side
steering box replaced c.png

one type of box has a oil filler nut on top.
steering box replaced d.png
 

Truxx

LE
Brilliant effort @SPROCKET321. A couple of things. Now you have got your Napoleon hat squared away it makes sense to sort out the shaft that runs from the gearshift to the gearbox front. |Dead easy to do now and a mare when the front axle beam is on. Worth putting some new nylon sleeves in too. Second, I know that you are well down the road with panel replacement by now but got a bit of a nasty shock recently when I discovered the repair panel I was welding in was galvanised under the black. Very nasty (cyanide) fumes. You can see the telltale white streaks on the other sides of the welds on this. No warning from the supplier. Good in one sense, for corrosion resistance (except where the zinc is burned off) but very nasty if you were in an enclosed space and unaware.

P1011580.JPG
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Until I saw this thread, I hadnt realised that the Bug had a steering box, having driven a few I presumed they were rack and pinion
my Moxford has a steering box and even after re shimming and adjustment it drives like a pikeys transit
perhaps the front suspension set up gives it the edge in that respect
 
Brilliant effort @SPROCKET321. A couple of things. Now you have got your Napoleon hat squared away it makes sense to sort out the shaft that runs from the gearshift to the gearbox front. |Dead easy to do now and a mare when the front axle beam is on. Worth putting some new nylon sleeves in too. Second, I know that you are well down the road with panel replacement by now but got a bit of a nasty shock recently when I discovered the repair panel I was welding in was galvanised under the black. Very nasty (cyanide) fumes. You can see the telltale white streaks on the other sides of the welds on this. No warning from the supplier. Good in one sense, for corrosion resistance (except where the zinc is burned off) but very nasty if you were in an enclosed space and unaware.

View attachment 491403
great tip, thanks, don't fancy a lung full of cyanide, been wearing a filter mask, but that just filters dust and debris and protects my boat-race from sparks, along with ear and eye wear protection, can't be too careful. Noticed the white deposit before and thought it was ash. I'm setting up for welding in the left floor pan half next. Measure , punch and drill for plug welds.
test fit left side pan c.png
 
started welding the front of the left side floor pan, and white death shows itself.
white ash.png

then, I promptly ran out of flux cored welding wire. so I order more and work on something else, like this rusty bar for the floor below the pedals.
pedal steel plate rusty.png
 
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