from Old English White to green moss and rust

Really heavy clout with the round end of a ball pein hammer.
That last photo looks like it was taken on a shipwreck by a marine archeologist.
I am not sure why you are doing it. but am admiring your work.
You have skills that would be in my opinion be better utilised restoring, how shall I put it, higher value motors. there are
Not a lot of kids coming through the ranks now that know nothing more than how to bolt a wing or bumper onto a Clio.
 
the ball joints put up a fight, but a hammer seldom looses. I had to cut one of the ball joints tapered shaft off inside the steering arm of the steering knuckle. after drilling and hitting it repeatedly with a hammer and drift it shot out across the workshop. The piece is in the picture bottom right, on the jaw of the vice.
front knuckle knock out.png
 
Really heavy clout with the round end of a ball pein hammer.
That last photo looks like it was taken on a shipwreck by a marine archeologist.
I am not sure why you are doing it. but am admiring your work.
You have skills that would be in my opinion be better utilised restoring, how shall I put it, higher value motors. there are
Not a lot of kids coming through the ranks now that know nothing more than how to bolt a wing or bumper onto a Clio.
why, because I learn by doing things the hard way. anyway, it's preparation for my next project, not going to say what, as I don't want to increase their prices, but they're Chunky, U.S Army, 12v, 1950's, Hawkeye stole one and they're relatively unknown in this part of the world. anyway, on with the Beetle.

with the Steering knuckle out, cleaned up with a wire brush and krusted, ready to be left to one side for a coat of black paint.
steering knuckle krusted.png
 
the rusted piece in the middle there is meant to be a grub screw in the axle arm.
rounded rusted off grub screww.png

removing this was time consuming, but now I know all about it It'll be easier on the other one.
front knuckle still in b.png
 
the other side was predictably easier. From rusty mess to a thing of Mechanical Beauty. The ball joint ends are to be replaced with new ones.
other side nuckle cleaned up.png


next up, the steering box.
steering box a.png
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Looking at the pictures, you could almost come to the conclusion that VW designed the car to be easy to dismantle and repair ?
 
off came the first arm, the upper left, with no hitches, the nut and grub screw were already out.
first arm off.png

cleaned up nice with a wire wheel in my angle grinder, making sure I stayed clear of the machined part. Don't want to gouge or scratch that.
cleaned up arm.png

with a coat of K-rust, it looks good as new
blackened arm.png
 
out popped the next one after a tussle with the grub screw, ended up undoing that with Mr Stilson, I'm replacing all the grubs as they are all wasted.
hammer out the bottom arm.png

they all cleaned up nice and neat, each with a card label to aid quick re-assembly when the time comes.
four arms and a pair of stub axles all blacked up.png
 
here is an interesting shot of the end of the torsion bar, the little dimple that seats the grub screw to fix the arm in position.
torsion bars.png

to stop rust dust and filth going inside, an old latex glove from the workshop bin, plugged it up rather well I thought.
latex gloves as dust caps.png
 
out with the steering box, "Muck and filth everywhere Mr Warrick"
steering box covered in filth.png

soon cleans up ok.
steering boc blacked up b.png


now I can clean up the stripped down front beam and assess how much rust damage it has suffered.
front beam stripped ready for cleaning.png
 
Ferdinand was a clever man, the Peoples car was not the only thing he designed with suspension arms and torsion bars, I bet they all have little grub screws holding them in place.
king tiger box art.jpg
 
cleaning up the stripped out front beam, and I have brushed on a coat of K-rust, lets take a look at the damage.
beam holes a.png

that area above is the worst, the damage is such that you can see daylight through the other side.
beam holes b.png

this is the other side, some welding needed here.
beam holes d.png


A new beam would cost £345. A large chunk out of my project budget, I will if I have to, but before I shell out I'm going to try and salvage this one with some welding. One thing in it's favor, it's straight.
beam straight.png
 
cleaning up the stripped out front beam, and I have brushed on a coat of K-rust, lets take a look at the damage.
View attachment 488826
that area above is the worst, the damage is such that you can see daylight through the other side.
View attachment 488827
this is the other side, some welding needed here.
View attachment 488828

A new beam would cost £345. A large chunk out of my project budget, I will if I have to, but before I shell out I'm going to try and salvage this one with some welding. One thing in it's favor, it's straight.
View attachment 488829

Got to be honest, without the slightest doubt of your ability to weld, that's fooked.
I'd be concerned about internal corrosion in the tubes/boxes that you can't see or repair as well as the bits you can see.
I would chalk that down as to suspect to not replace it. Given what it does and how it works, I would wing it.

To repair it you are just welding to weld.
 
For the sake of a hours ? round trip and £65 i woudl buy something like that , plenty for sale for less than £80 in much better shape.
[/QUOTE]

thanks Grouchy, for that spot, I went up there this morning and for 65 notes, I couldn't say no to it, there are some differences though.
new front beam comparison.png


the shock towers are a different shape, they take the side bolt on shocks, the current shocks are knackered so I may do an upgrade.
shock tower.png

comparison between the two for condition, there's no comparison, the new one looks like it's never been used.
new front beam comparison  a png.png

new front beam comparison  b png.png
 
Last edited:
No probs , i thought the bits cannot be that expensive and luckily there was something near you ! Good luck with it .

Didnt know it was different though sorry .
 
No probs , i thought the bits cannot be that expensive and luckily there was something near you ! Good luck with it .

Didnt know it was different though sorry .
no worries Mate, I appreciate you looking out for me. The differences aren't much of a problem, the main thing is, as you say, the condition of a part like this is crucial. and as Jagman 2 said, "for what it does".

here's a view inside, nice and free from rust.
black hole B.png
 

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top