Froggies & Others Sunk by the Royal Navy?

#1
I know, I know this should be in the Rum Ration but it means joining as an outsider, wouldn't expect them over here in ARRSE so won't intrude over there...

Having read all the Sharpe Books I succumbed to reading the Hornblower Books, so far have read 5 of the 11 that C.S. Forester wrote... many a tale of daring do by the jolly jack tars of the senior service, 4 of Hornblower's smaller boats have just successfully carried out a raid destroying 24 ships under the cover of darkness... it got me wondering if there is a definitive list anywhere online that details the total destruction carried out by the R.N. during the Napoleonic Era?

Good books by the way!
 
#2
Read the series following the exploits of Jack Aubrey by Patrick O'Brian if your like Hornblower. It is a little more in depth but really throws you into the era. A couple of pages in and I'm pacing the decks of the living room with my sea service pistol in my belt going Arrrrrrr!
 
#3
Croque_Monsieur said:
Read the series following the exploits of Jack Aubrey by Patrick O'Brian if your like Hornblower. It is a little more in depth but really throws you into the era. A couple of pages in and I'm pacing the decks of the living room with my sea service pistol in my belt going Arrrrrrr!
Sounds good... I never thought I'd enjoy reading books about the Navy during the Napoleonic Era but they are a Right Rivetting Read! just wondering how much Historical Fact v Artistic Licence went into the stories...

For any Game fans out there, next month there is a very realistic looking game coming out that everyone is harping on about called Empire Total War, here is the Trailer:


Empire Total War Trailer

The Sea Battle Bit

The Land Battles
 
#4
As with Sharp the Hornblower books are based on fact, the PELLEW brothers were historic
 
#6
And Empire: Total War is going to be AWESOME. I've already warned the Memsahib that she's going to lose me for a couple of weeks!
 
#7
CarpeDiem said:
And Empire: Total War is going to be AWESOME. I've already warned the Memsahib that she's going to lose me for a couple of weeks!
Got to order that today
 
#9
Gundulph said:
Think I have found something that shows all the Prize Ships Won by the Royal Navy:

Prize Ships
That is some list ,even better than the Index in my "History of the RN "and "The Frigates" books
 
#10
Interestingly, and I will put it in the Things You Didn't Know About History thread later, there were two vessels called Swiftsure at Trafalgar, both British built, one in Nelson's fleet and one (previously captured) in the French.

Even more strangely, all three navies there had a warship called Neptune present at the battle.
 
#12
...and we're about to trash another French ship:

Linky thingy

Take that you Frogs!

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Rodney2q

...oh wait a minute, it's all contaminated...

:? :? :?
 
#13
A very good introduction to frigate warfare is “Eyes of the Fleet” by Anthony Price.

He looks at the role of frigates in Nelson’s Navy and the life of the crews through a detailed study of six contrasting frigate Captains.

Edward Pellew and Thomas Cochrane are included as is Hornblower (!) as his fictional “life” is apparently very representative of a real naval officer of the time.
 
#14
I'm reading The Line Upon a Wind by Noel Mostert at the moment — subtitled "An intimate history of the last and greatest war fought at sea under sail 1793-1815", it's very good reading. If nothing else it makes you realise what incredible courage so many of the sailors had (on all sides). Also, the politicians were mostly total wakners, proving that some things never change ....

I recommend the book. It'll keep you busy for a while.
 
#15
Dashing_Chap said:
The fictional stories are a load of tosh tbh, the real life drama is far more impressive. Read an account of 'The Battle of Cape St Vincent" & I'm sure you'll agree.

http://www.hms.org.uk/nelsonsnavystvinc.htm

-DC
Damn'd right, in January 1798 2 british ships sailed into Manila Bay, conned the guard boat into thinking they were French, took 3 gunboats without a shot being fired. The two captains, Cooke and Malcolm both French speakers then gave their two hundred prisoners a fine meal and sent them on their way and left with their prizes in tow
 
#16
I can't speak as to C.S. Forester but Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey novels are very authentic.

Nearly all of the ships and actions are historical, the only real fictional bits are the main charaters and where O'Brian has to string two seperate events together for continuity.

Try to pick up The Mauritius Command if you don't plan on reading them all. The only change from historical fact is replacing Josias Rowley with Jack Aubrey.
 
#17
C.S. Forester wrote two books on the RN & the USN to highlight the Med & Pacific in WW2. His USN book highlighted the only supply item, the replenishments ships were unable to reproduce, toilet paper.
 
#18
tropper66 said:
As with Sharp the Hornblower books are based on fact, the PELLEW brothers were historic
my bold
As`was Thomas Cochrane LINK
 
#19
Dashing_Chap said:
The fictional stories are a load of tosh tbh, the real life drama is far more impressive. Read an account of 'The Battle of Cape St Vincent" & I'm sure you'll agree.

http://www.hms.org.uk/nelsonsnavystvinc.htm

-DC
A lot of the incidents in the O'Brien novels are strongly based on historical events. The Mauritius Command is probably the best example- aside from the fictitious character of Jack Aubrey, the course of the campaign in the book is the same as the real campaign as fought.

One good way of getting a feel for the number of ships taken or sunk by the RN during the Eighteenth Century is to look at the number of foreign (particularly French) ship names in RN service. TEMERAIRE and PRESIDENT are good starting points.

A great true-story of the RN in the days of fighting sail is the voyage of Anson to take the Manila Galleon. He set off with five ships, with insufficient stores, a shortage of trained seamen (one ship was filled with Chelsea pensioners!). His squadron was lost / scattered going around Cape Horn, and he spent the best part of a year in China refitting and waiting to take on the Spanish Manila Galleon (carrying all the gold of the Philipines). He succeeded and arrived home in a ship ballasted with riches.

Stirring stuff. Am going to go and calm down.
 
#20
Sorry, P2000, although we did capture a French vessel and bring her into service in the C18 as PRESIDENT, she wasn't the first RN warship to carry that name. Actually, she was the third! The original HMS PRESIDENT was named after the President of HM's Privy Council in the C15.

It's a valid point about the foreign names though.
 

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