Frenchman to cross Atlantic in a barrel

#61
Well, the last two days must be doing wonders for his morale. Two days of travelling in the right direction at good speed and in calm weather has cancelled out the previous four days of travelling in the wrong direction while battened down.

A long way to go yet but the first bit of good fortune since he set off.

Another morale booster is that he had a conversation with a passing freighter using his VHF radio. He's tried unsuccessfully a couple of times so at least now he knows that the bloody thing works, even if only with a range of a couple of miles.
 
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Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
#62
#63
#64
He's still got a way to go.

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#66
3 months sounds optimistic at this stage judging by current progress

Lack of Wind Slows Frenchman Crossing Atlantic In Barrel

French adventurer Jean-Jacques Savin is 36 days into his attempt to cross the Atlantic in a specially built orange barrel.

With no engine, sails or paddles, the unusual craft relies on trade winds and currents to push him 4,800 kilometers from the Canary Islands to Caribbean in about three months.
 
#68
3 months sounds optimistic at this stage judging by current progress

Lack of Wind Slows Frenchman Crossing Atlantic In Barrel

French adventurer Jean-Jacques Savin is 36 days into his attempt to cross the Atlantic in a specially built orange barrel.

With no engine, sails or paddles, the unusual craft relies on trade winds and currents to push him 4,800 kilometers from the Canary Islands to Caribbean in about three months.
I would have said that it's not the lack of wind that has been the problem but the excess of wind from the wrong direction.

Savin's problem at the moment is to get South enough to make the Antilles. Missing them would add a long distance to make landfall.
 
#72
It looks very still again.

SPOT Shared Page

He is hoping to meet a ship soon to refuel. By the Ron Brown I think he means the Ronald Brown, NOAA's largest ship. About NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown | Office of Marine and Aviation Operations

82nd day, Monday 18 March

16 h 30: Finally we pivot, amazing with the plotter to see this beautifully drawn loop that cuts 6 hours after the trace of the rise and then follows in parallel this mark. I think a static angler would be surprised to see me back near him, I have the memory of having toured for 5 days in a circle in a square of 10 Kms side and it was 37 days ago ...

And to say that at my departure a zealous on Facebook wanted to associate my crossing with a previous adventure barrel equipped with boom, but sir if I had the least way to direct myself, I would be much lower and in view of the West Indies, because a day like today where by F3 I move to 1 Nm. In the 165 *, well I will be 2, 3 Nm in the 230 * and may catch the HP that is set up on Florida to run on West Indies.

Yesterday in the evening, a phenomenon amused me, I photographed the morning sunrise from the starboard side (right) and the evening always bedtime by the starboard side ... due to the 180 * carried out.

My companions are always absent, nothing moves on the horizon.

I hope I have news of the RON BROWN, 82 m long, it's going to be a magical moment and I will need to be refueling ... 3 months ago today under heavy rain I left discreetly ARS to join a ferry to the south of Spain ...

Thank you Martine, thank you Gilles to embark on this crossing and take the 128th place among which many unknown but generous like you.
It makes me very happy Dominique to be followed by your class, you can send me the first names, there is also room for them to travel and thank you for spreading my trip through your contacts abroad.
Arnaud, nice your message: Yes in the middle of the big empty spaces, we feel the same sensations that it is isolated in the desert or on the sea or like you in your mountain without any means of communication, the attitudes are similar. You have to cope, you have to face it and every gesture is calculated to avoid the glitch ...

Your passage where you returned to the bourgeoisie you had difficulty to express and well I knew the same problem, because I went to live 5 months and a half at the pygmies, very limited discussions, on my return to the capital Bangui and very quickly in France, I was just like you very clumsy in dialogue especially with new people ...

I hope that when I return, I will always use the word.

Good evening Edgar

Good night P'tit Louis

See you tomorrow.

Position: 23 * 452. N. 043 * 833. O.
Performed: 17 nm = 31 Kms
Depth: 3,430 meters
 
#73
Over the last fortnight, he's had some bad luck with winds pushing him north but they turned so that although he's been slowed down, he's not drastically off course.

He's at a position now where it all depends on the winds as there's not going to be much room left for correction. If he gets prolonged northerly winds, he might just catch the northern end of the Antilles. Any southerly winds and he'll miss completely. The current alone would also cause him to miss.

He was supposed to RV with the NOAA ship on the 19th but his blog hasn't been updated since the 18th. He'll need replenishing if he misses the Antilles - not only has he little food left (despite having reduced his rations since about a week out) but he was running out of gas for cooking. I suspect that if he wasn't anticipating landing on the US coast, extending his journey by many weeks, he would have foregone the replenishment opportunity - when he accepted the NOAA offer, he was heading for Newfoundland!
 
#74
Of course, if he doesn't make landfall in the next few weeks, there's also the possibility that he'll catch southwesterlies that could take him to Iceland or Ireland... At least that would be convenient for getting his barrel back home.
 
#75
It's all very odd.

It's a week since his blog was updated (18th) although his tracker still reports his position each morning. He was supposed to RV with the NOAA ship on the 19th but NOAA report that transfer of provisions happened on the 23rd.

For the last week, his transit has been in a ruler-straight line in the general direction of the northern tip of the Antilles. This is particularly odd considering that throughout his journey, he has been zigzagging or circling. Straight lines have rarely lasted for more than 3 days.

If I were a conspiracy theorist, I'd be wondering whether he's in the lee of a larger vessel that's blocking an adverse wind. (Added - he's not though. At least not according to the Marine Traffic tracker. He's just in a constant 20 knot easterly wind).
 
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#76
Well, he's partially updated his blog to the point where the NOAA ship gave him supplies.

In the lead up to this, it seemed that he anticipated being invited aboard for a proper meal and a shower. In the event, the Ronald H Brown lowered 30kg of food, took his rubbish and drove off, all within an hour.

Inhospitable? Perhaps, but I can well understand the thinking behind it. Savin has a home-made cylinder, took 13 weeks of food for an anticipated 3 month journey (i.e. no contingency for delays), no support/safety vessel, relies on a tablet tethered to a satellite phone for communication (and seems to rely on the barrel yard to pass information to the IMO) as he drifts through major shipping lanes, has a VHF radio with a range of only a couple of miles, expects everyone to move out of his way when he's undetectable on radar and doesn't show up on satellite-based trackers. He updates his SPOT position once a day (if he isn't battened down in rough seas) so he could be anywhere within 50 miles of his last update - more in bad weather.

While there's no dispute that he's a ballsy old coot, there's also little doubt that he set off with inadequate preparation, reliant on the maritime obligation of others should he get into trouble. No wonder that he seems to have been cold-shouldered by the NOAA as a discouragement to other would-be adventurers.

I wonder whether he has given any thought in regard to landing. He has a deep keel on his barrel so it'll likely capsize if it does wash up on a beach. Or will he be hoping that there'll be a convenient boat that'll tow him into a harbour for free, rather than claiming salvage?
 
#77
Well, he's partially updated his blog to the point where the NOAA ship gave him supplies.

In the lead up to this, it seemed that he anticipated being invited aboard for a proper meal and a shower. In the event, the Ronald H Brown lowered 30kg of food, took his rubbish and drove off, all within an hour.

Inhospitable? Perhaps, but I can well understand the thinking behind it. Savin has a home-made cylinder, took 13 weeks of food for an anticipated 3 month journey (i.e. no contingency for delays), no support/safety vessel, relies on a tablet tethered to a satellite phone for communication (and seems to rely on the barrel yard to pass information to the IMO) as he drifts through major shipping lanes, has a VHF radio with a range of only a couple of miles, expects everyone to move out of his way when he's undetectable on radar and doesn't show up on satellite-based trackers. He updates his SPOT position once a day (if he isn't battened down in rough seas) so he could be anywhere within 50 miles of his last update - more in bad weather.

While there's no dispute that he's a ballsy old coot, there's also little doubt that he set off with inadequate preparation, reliant on the maritime obligation of others should he get into trouble. No wonder that he seems to have been cold-shouldered by the NOAA as a discouragement to other would-be adventurers.

I wonder whether he has given any thought in regard to landing. He has a deep keel on his barrel so it'll likely capsize if it does wash up on a beach. Or will he be hoping that there'll be a convenient boat that'll tow him into a harbour for free, rather than claiming salvage?
The old sod probably stocked up with an industrial quantity of gallic shrugs of indifference for all the above eventualities, before he quit France.
 
#78
Dont know whether to be horrified or to laugh my socks off... click "see more" and scroll down to the English translation:


As ever, there's much useful stuff to be learned from experience.
 
#79
Btw, the "aerial drift" is a little sail that he puts up on the front of the barrel to keep it in the right orientation, without which the barrel rolls about its fore-aft axis.
 

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