Freemasons

Obviously, you know nothing of Freemasonry, If you did you would not be posting about them or seeking information on here.

1. Free Masonry is a secret society!
2. You need at least three Masons to recommend you!
3. You have to have a strong belief in a Superior Being (GOD).
4. You don't become a Mason overnight, it takes time and you go through a series of levels of which must be passed. (although I have never heard of an ex Mason)
5. All Masons are sworn to secrecy with penalties for offenders. So your friend discussing it with you violates the code. Masons do not freely admit to being a Freemason.
6. As for the 10%? Wrong you are getting catholic church service donations mixed up. The Masons do not stipulate a fee! Although most Masons are wealthy in their own right and donate accordingly.

From being a Freemason.
" A Freemason is committed to bettering himself, his community, and the world. He is on a journey of self-discovery believing in something greater than himself, a journey in which he will be supported by other good men ".

And you don't need to be a Mason to believe and do good, you can do it in many different ways and keep it between God and yourself. Unless of course, you seek recognition, which a Mason never does.


What on earth



1 - Nope. Wrong.
2- Nope. Wrong.
3- Nope. Wrong.
4- Nope, you do become a Freemason after your Initiation, the further degrees take you further in a journey of self development.
5- Nope. Wrong.
6- There isn't a 10% fee, but nor is there some strange wealth requirement.

Thankfully your final two parts, the quote and your last paragraph are at least not wildly wrong.

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Cyberhacker

War Hero
1. Free Masonry is a secret society!
...
5. All Masons are sworn to secrecy with penalties for offenders. So your friend discussing it with you violates the code. Masons do not freely admit to being a Freemason.
1. No, no and thrice no! Freemasonry is not a secret society... it is a society with secrets.
5. We don't discuss the Secrets, but we can openly admin to being Freemasons
 

Sabretooth

War Hero
There was a scheme to amalgamate Lodges with falling numbers in our province but realistically it was a bit of a non starter; firstly whose name came first on the new name, 'The Lodge of A+B' or 'The Lodge of B+A'? plus there's usually a reason a Lodge is failing. One suggested we join forces, our secretary did a bit of research and found the average age of the other Lodge was in the mid 80s and they'd had no new members for several years. We declined the offer.

An idea to merge two failing Lodges came to nothing for similar reasons.

Where Lodges do hand in their warrant the members seem either to become joining members or bin it.

Some of the new Lodges come into being to fill a new 'need' we had a fishing Lodge open a while back.

I'd say that the future looks uncertain for a lot of Lodges and centres too, don't forget they've had no real income for almost a year. In our case we seem unlikely to reopen before April which means that there'll have been no live meetings for 14 months. I wonder if UGLE's portion of subscriptions will be reduced to reflect a year's worth of nothing?
Freemasons stem from the Knight Templar who were an off shute of the Knights of Soloman and protected the poor pilgrims who were tracking to Jerusalem after the Templars liberated it from Muslim rule. The Knight Templaer were also the ones who paid for and built all the Great Churches and Cathedrals, Hense Stone Mason = Freemasons. The Kight Templar is said to have disbanded over 700 years ago and the Freemasons adopted some of the ways and Symbols.
There is a hierarchy in the Masons, and all lodges vote on whether a new lodge is warranted or not. So for some to claim they are, shall we say going out of business shows a lack of Knowledge, Masonry is actually on the increase, and when I read posts about Fishing Lodges! It tells me that there is confusion between the Freemasons and Moose, Fishing, Hunting lodges, etc. Freemasons are very religious and provided much needs service and financial help to the poor and needy much like the founders of the KT's.

Not for us, My Lord, not for us, but to Your Name give the glory.
 

Sabretooth

War Hero
What on earth



1 - Nope. Wrong.
2- Nope. Wrong.
3- Nope. Wrong.
4- Nope, you do become a Freemason after your Initiation, the further degrees take you further in a journey of self development.
5- Nope. Wrong.
6- There isn't a 10% fee, but nor is there some strange wealth requirement.

Thankfully your final two parts, the quote and your last paragraph are at least not wildly wrong.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
Your superior Knowledge would leave a Mason with a Blunt Chisel.
 

Sabretooth

War Hero
1. No, no and thrice no! Freemasonry is not a secret society... it is a society with secrets.
5. We don't discuss the Secrets, but we can openly admin to being Freemasons
The work of a Freemason is secret they don't go around seeking gratitude and therefore their work is secret and Masons do not brag or talk about Freemasonry outside of the lodge. Therefore they are a Secret Society..
 
Freemasons stem from the Knight Templar

There is a hierarchy in the Masons, and all lodges vote on whether a new lodge is warranted or not.

Freemasons are very religious.

In terms of originating from the Knights Templar - much debated, little proof that this is the case.

On your next point - not true. Lodges certain do not vote on whether a new lodge is warranted or not.

Very religious? Some are, many are not.

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The work of a Freemason is secret they don't go around seeking gratitude and therefore their work is secret and Masons do not brag or talk about Freemasonry outside of the lodge. Therefore they are a Secret Society..
Incorrect.

Many of us talk about it all over the place, including social media, and even Arrse (would you believe it)

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Sabretooth

War Hero
No age limit.
Different lodges have different financial obligations.

No. We charge extra for dry stone wall masonry.

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The minimum age is 18.
All Wall repairs can be completed by Murphy and Murphy and Son of Murphy the Stone Mason, who will no doubt charge you a fee for between tea breaks..
 
1. No, no and thrice no! Freemasonry is not a secret society... it is a society with secrets.
5. We don't discuss the Secrets, but we can openly admin to being Freemasons
What about getting the stripper in on a Saturday night?
 
Obviously, you know nothing of Freemasonry, If you did you would not be posting about them or seeking information on here.

1. Free Masonry is a secret society!
2. You need at least three Masons to recommend you!
3. You have to have a strong belief in a Superior Being (GOD).
4. You don't become a Mason overnight, it takes time and you go through a series of levels of which must be passed. (although I have never heard of an ex Mason)
5. All Masons are sworn to secrecy with penalties for offenders. So your friend discussing it with you violates the code. Masons do not freely admit to being a Freemason.
6. As for the 10%? Wrong you are getting catholic church service donations mixed up. The Masons do not stipulate a fee! Although most Masons are wealthy in their own right and donate accordingly.

From being a Freemason.
" A Freemason is committed to bettering himself, his community, and the world. He is on a journey of self-discovery believing in something greater than himself, a journey in which he will be supported by other good men ".

And you don't need to be a Mason to believe and do good, you can do it in many different ways and keep it between God and yourself. Unless of course, you seek recognition, which a Mason never does.
What on earth are you doing replying to a post that was made over 14 years ago?

It's hardly surprising there is so much misconception amongst the general public when you post inaccuracies.

1. Freemasonry is NOT a secret society. The various Grand Lodges have their own websites, so too do Provincial Grand Lodges and also many individual lodges. Hardly the mark of a secret society.

2. You don't need at least three masons to recommend you. Absolute rubbish. If people want to become Freemasons they don't need to wait to be invited and if they don't know any masons they can make enquires directly to a lodge or the Provincial Grand Lodge through their website contact page. When joining a lodge a man (or women for the ladies' lodges) must be proposed and seconded in accordance with the constitutions of the order and a ballot takes place. It would be highly unusual for a ballot to prove unfavourable because of the steps taken to get to that point.

3. There is a requirement for a belief in a Supreme (not Superior) Being. That belief is personal to the individual and need not be discussed, just affirmed.

4. It can take a while to join a lodge but that's because there is often a period of 'getting to know you' and certain processes must be gone through. You can't just pitch up to a meeting on the off-chance and join there and then. Once you have been Initiated (not as bad as it might sound, it's just a joining ceremony) you are a Freemason. There are a series of further steps to take but nothing is compulsory. People do leave the Craft, as it is known, so there are people who are ex-masons.

5. Again, more rubbish. The only thing a Freemason is obligated not to do is reveal the 'modes of recognition'. I.e. the 'grip or token' (dodgy handshake if you like) and accompanying signs and words. These all change for different degrees and orders beyond the Craft so there isn't one singular mode or recognition, just the initial basic one that all masons will know from their initiation. Masons can freely acknowledge their membership and discuss it with non-masons. It's even now encouraged but ever being mindful of it being done in appropriate circumstances.

6. Wrong again. There are fees but these will be set by the individual lodges. Some lodges are more expensive than others and there are a number of reasons for his. These fees are no different to annual subscriptions for other societies and organisations and go towards the general administration of the lodge and upkeep of the masonic hall etc. Most masons are not wealthy in their own right.
 
As I have mentioned earlier, I left the Craft about 4 years ago because I'd stopped enjoying it. I had enjoyed my Mother lodge, my old school lodge, but there was a problem getting to the installation meetings which always clashed with an important family occasion. I was then told I couldn't go from JW to SW as I'd missed the previous Installation. I'd brought 4 new members in by using Social media and Linkedin to generate interest.

The local Lodge which I joined was one of two in town - they have just merged. I suggested using modern tech to generate interest and you'd have thought I'd been found taking a dump in the PGM's apron case.

At one LoI (ceremony rehearsal for the lay) we spent - I sh1t you not - 20 minutes discussing how many fingers the Deacons should hold their wand with and whether they could rest the butt on the floor.

The installation started at 2pm and we didn't leave the table until 10pm! When I started making it known that if I went into the Chair my Installation would take place during a normal meeting there was collective apoplexy.

Hence why I stopped enjoying it. What the Craft does is noble and I think the mindset made me a better person or at least one who thought more about what I was doing but I could no longer justify the time, effort and expense. Also Chapter made no sense and gave me nothing more - they just did the same thing every time.
 
Freemasons stem from the Knight Templar who were an off shute of the Knights of Soloman and protected the poor pilgrims who were tracking to Jerusalem after the Templars liberated it from Muslim rule. The Knight Templaer were also the ones who paid for and built all the Great Churches and Cathedrals, Hense Stone Mason = Freemasons. The Kight Templar is said to have disbanded over 700 years ago and the Freemasons adopted some of the ways and Symbols.
There is a hierarchy in the Masons, and all lodges vote on whether a new lodge is warranted or not. So for some to claim they are, shall we say going out of business shows a lack of Knowledge, Masonry is actually on the increase, and when I read posts about Fishing Lodges! It tells me that there is confusion between the Freemasons and Moose, Fishing, Hunting lodges, etc. Freemasons are very religious and provided much needs service and financial help to the poor and needy much like the founders of the KT's.

Not for us, My Lord, not for us, but to Your Name give the glory.
There is no correlation between Freemasonry and the Knights Templar. The Masonic order of the Knights Templar (the United Religious, Military and Masonic Orders of the Temple and of St John of Jerusalem, Palestine, Rhodes and Malta in England and Wales and Provinces Overseas) claims no connection to the historic chivalric military order of the Knights Templar.

You are also wrong when you say that all lodges vote on whether a lodge is warranted. What may happen in the USA is different to what we do in the Motherland. In accordance with UGLE Book of Constitution Rules 94 and 96 we submit a petition to the M.W. The Grand Master of the United Fraternity of Antient Free and Accepted Masons of England, via our Provincial Grand Master, stating that we are desirous of forming a new lodge. Other lodges don't get any say in the matter.
 
As I have mentioned earlier, I left the Craft about 4 years ago because I'd stopped enjoying it. I had enjoyed my Mother lodge, my old school lodge, but there was a problem getting to the installation meetings which always clashed with an important family occasion. I was then told I couldn't go from JW to SW as I'd missed the previous Installation. I'd brought 4 new members in by using Social media and Linkedin to generate interest.

The local Lodge which I joined was one of two in town - they have just merged. I suggested using modern tech to generate interest and you'd have thought I'd been found taking a dump in the PGM's apron case.

At one LoI (ceremony rehearsal for the lay) we spent - I sh1t you not - 20 minutes discussing how many fingers the Deacons should hold their wand with and whether they could rest the butt on the floor.

The installation started at 2pm and we didn't leave the table until 10pm! When I started making it known that if I went into the Chair my Installation would take place during a normal meeting there was collective apoplexy.

Hence why I stopped enjoying it. What the Craft does is noble and I think the mindset made me a better person or at least one who thought more about what I was doing but I could no longer justify the time, effort and expense. Also Chapter made no sense and gave me nothing more - they just did the same thing every time.

Whilst I have some sympathy with some of your comments the Installation meeting is a different kettle of fish. The proceedings are pretty much set in stone and are laid out in the Book of Constitutions. The Master Elect is pretty much a passenger in the proceedings. He does what he's told, when he's told. so just sit back and enjoy the ride. At the very least you'll get the DPGM or an APGM turn up with the ProvSGW & ProvJGW & the ProvGDC or ProvAGDC to take charge. If you are lucky you will get a full Provincial turn out with the PGM, Sword Bearers, Standard Bearers, Uncle Tom Cobley and all. This is a bit of a privilege for a lodge as it doesn't come round all that often. No Installation meeting is ever a normal meeting.
 
I'll just chuck an opinion in here which I hope will encourage some.

I know some English Lodges can appear elitist or run by the aristocracy but we have to remember that's how English Freemasonry started - it was one of those fads that aristos have embraced throughout history. I think that saved the craft over here because it allowed the ruling classes to assure the monarchy that the blue lodge was not being used for conspiratorial matters against the throne, the same way as the 'reds' used it in France. That's the reason why religion and politics is never discusssed in lodge - and that has proved useful down through the years too.

Scottish Freemasonry is only different because of the number of operative lodges who converted to 'free and antient' status. My own lodge is one of those, having been an Irish operative lodge before renumbering on the roll of one of the Scottish Grand Lodges.

There are many English Lodges which are not expensive however and I suggest a wee chat with Provincial Grand Lodge before applying to join a particular number, or even chat with lodge members.

It's a great thing for ex-servicemen, especially those just coming out to civvy street because it provides an immediate social circle with many good contacts and gives you a focal point in your life if you don't have a hobby. As Yellow Devil points out though it is easy to get too involved and it will take up a lot of your time so you need to be careful if you're a married man not to let it take over your life.

In an ideal scenario a life membership can reduce the expenses considerably for the bigger lodges - albeit at a much higher joining cost.

I'd say the best advice I could give anyone thinking of joining is to ask the questions first rather than find yourself in a position whereby you can't afford to dine out with your lodge because the harmony is held in an hotel or restaurant. I've never been involved in one of those harmonies because I've never come across a Scottish Lodge which dines out. All our festive boards are offered 'in lodge' and range from a sandwich or a pie up to a full five course dinner (of simple food) at costs of no more than £5 per member.

My own lodge has never owned its own temple, we've always shared or rented with others, so I've had the priviledge of being raised at Mary's Chapel but never paid more than a fiver for my dinner and I think it works better for me because you move straight from temple to the dining room or bar and the events of the evening can be discussed straight away.

If anyone is thinking of joining in Scotland, let me know and I'll point you towards an appropriate lodge for your area and if I have any contacts in that lodge I'll put you in touch.

Nearly forgot - the Templars. They are linked to us by two things. 1. The symbology - a lot of ours was borrowed from them because it suited both the mystic and Biblical outlook of the craft. 2. The St Clairs. They were Templars and their descendants became freemasons. But there is no 'actual' link between the two organisations.
Was thinking of joining the craft. Do you enquire or wIt for an invite?
 
Was thinking of joining the craft. Do you enquire or wIt for an invite?
If you don't know anyone that is a mason then enquire. Otherwise you could be waiting a long time. Get in touch with your Province via their website.
 
Whilst I have some sympathy with some of your comments the Installation meeting is a different kettle of fish. The proceedings are pretty much set in stone and are laid out in the Book of Constitutions. The Master Elect is pretty much a passenger in the proceedings. He does what he's told, when he's told. so just sit back and enjoy the ride. At the very least you'll get the DPGM or an APGM turn up with the ProvSGW & ProvJGW & the ProvGDC or ProvAGDC to take charge. If you are lucky you will get a full Provincial turn out with the PGM, Sword Bearers, Standard Bearers, Uncle Tom Cobley and all. This is a bit of a privilege for a lodge as it doesn't come round all that often. No Installation meeting is ever a normal meeting.
My Mother Lodge and others I visited managed Installation in a meeting that was no more than 20 minutes or so longer than an Initiation. When I went to the local one there were huge sections of ritual that I'd never seen. Great chunks of reading rules and by laws. Then at Festive Board, the DPGM droned on for 35, yes 35 minutes. It was like pulling teeth. I was driving so had no reason to stay and came very close to just standing up and leaving. I wasn't the only one.

Plus the buffet before the meeting where the junior members were 'expected' to come along and wait on the Provincial visitors. I've no issue with hosting over a cuppa and a few sandwiches, but I am no man's servant and would not expect another Brother to serve me when I could serve myself.
 

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