Freemasons

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
I joined the craft for the piss ups and the parties, i thought once, im in I'll join a lodge in a pub near me. Of course I had no Idea how it worked so I was initiated in to a great old lodge with some people in it who I knew and surprised me . Then after the meeting they said see you in September . What ?? I had no idea that we closed for summer and was let down.

Anyway something happened in the break which set me off in my masonic career and journalism. I was through all the degrees by the following may and had made some great friends inside and outside the lodge . oitsiders talk about oh yore not high enuff to noe the real secrets but I found my self in the pub regularly drinking with the "top nobbs" one was the then G.SEC. but I dint know that till much later.
Head office had a much moire laid back regime then and on the whole you could wander in and out and have tea or coffee with all sorts of the squad. I look back to those days fondly however they went very active it seemed to do things FOR the members to me it SEEMED more about edicts about what you COULDNT do .But that was my boyish youthfully fever grin.

As a friend was lord mayor one year we worked out that if 100 lodges marched just with their banners and they each donated x£ 's to the lord mayors fun that we could raise a substantial amount . This was blocked , I had been in about five years by then, a few of us also arranged up to a point, that we could run the Antiques road show from GT.. q st. without the cameras but that was blocked . I am pleased to say that later on with a regime change both these things were achieved albeit without me or my oppos participation.

I was slowly going up the ladder but found it hard to retain the words , my interest in the history of the craft exploded and soon I was on radio and TV regarding Freemasonry etc.
Now I tell you this not to big me up . Purely to explain that I joined with one set of Ideas and ended up doing something totally unexpected. Which to me was a bonus. I went through the chair became a founding member of another lodge then due to ill health etc etc I had to give it all up . I still research the history and write the odd article for no masonic outlets but i regard my time in the craft as time well spent . I loved KT, but couldn't get on with chapter , work that one out .
POTS
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
I would like to suggest that if you have any interest in Masonic history that you go to your local county or city archives and see what gems you can discover in the Quarter Sessions ( petty sessions) returns . A veritable gold mine of information mostly unworked .
It would be nice to hear of any results bretheren or anyone in fact as these records are open to all .
 
I've already answered this for you. Look in your provincial year book. It will list every lodge in your province. It will list the names of each of the lodge members (you may find that members of your own lodge will also belong to other lodges). It will provide the contact details of each lodge secretary who you can contact about visiting. If you don't have a year book then ask your lodge sec for one. Also, use your provincial grand lodge website as a resource. You do not need to hide your desire to visit other lodges, it is a normal part of masonry.

You don't have to tell your lodge you want to leave until the time is right for you to do so.
Except... he's an EA. Which makes unaccompanied visiting tricky, if not impossible.

I mean, I agree with everything you've written otherwise, but that is the fly in the ointment.

I would suggest sticking it out until he's been raised then cracking on with it.
 
I disagree. I visited as an EA and FC unaccompanied.

You just have to email ahead and check that the ceremony is one you have already been through (although time with an experienced Brother outside of the Temple when you have to leave can be incredibly useful)

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I disagree. I visited as an EA and FC unaccompanied.

You just have to email ahead and check that the ceremony is one you have already been through (although time with an experienced Brother outside of the Temple when you have to leave can be incredibly useful)

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must vary by province then - in Oxon you're expected to have a MM from your own lodge with you to vouch until you've been raised (or at least that is how it has always been explained to me by my lodge). Although, as another 39 yr old in a lodge where I lower the average age by about 25 years, maybe they're just being cautious....!

Not that it matters since I've been raised obviously.
 
I was visiting as an EA at 21 haha
I've never seen a rule written down like that, maybe a provincial thing or more likely a rumour that has got out of hand!

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Except... he's an EA. Which makes unaccompanied visiting tricky, if not impossible.

I mean, I agree with everything you've written otherwise, but that is the fly in the ointment.

I would suggest sticking it out until he's been raised then cracking on with it.
I take your point about the difficulty with visiting as an EA (and FC) as you don't have a Grand Lodge certificate. Even so, that on it's own is not always sufficient, I had to prove myself in the three degrees and produce my GL cert when I visited a lodge in Scotland.

Yes, he will have to leave the lodge for a while if they are working a ceremony in a higher degree but every lodge should be experienced in having new brethren visit and usually the lodge mentor or some other senior PM will accompany them rather than leave them twiddling their thumbs on their own.

However, I maintain my point that as visiting is a normal part of freemasonry there is no need for him to hide it from his mother lodge and, in fact, his secretary should vouch for him on his behalf to the sec of any lodge he wishes to visit if he doesn't have anyone from his own lodge to go with.
 
A number of years ago we had a very enthusiastic E.A. On hearing at our lodge meeting that the Provincial Grand Lodge was meeting in his home town the following week,he duly rocked up. He was somewhat crestfallen when he found that he couldn't attend the meeting. I'm happy to say now that he is our W.Bro.Sec. He regularly attends PGL and I've no doubt he'll get Provincial Cuffs in the fullness of time. I have to admire his balls. I attended my Grand Lodge once many years ago as a very recently installed W.M. and almost shat myself when the Grand Master spoke to me after the meeting.
 
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do you visit a lodge if you don’t have a contact, and without notifying your exist
Many lodges these days have websites or at the very least there should be contact details for every lodge within your Province on their website. Just a matter of emailing the Secretary with your details. He may phone you for a chat. I hope he'd have a brother of the lodge detailed to keep you company for your visit. No real need to tell your own lodge.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I’ve been a Freemason for almost a year but to be honest I’m not sure how long I’ll keep it up. I thought it was just the five meetings a year with social visits in between, in actual fact we rehearse every week, kind of takes the fun out of it.
Not always easy trying to learn rituals with a family and work. If you’re retired I can see how people do it.
Have a chat with your lodge Mentor. If he is doing his job he will be aware of the difficulties younger brethren have in juggling family , career and craft (Always in that order) There is nothing shameful in having a year or two off the ladder/stewards list for personal reasons. The key is to tell people in advance so they can help you. Good luck , most of us have had similar problems at some stage.
 

DibDab

Swinger
When I joined my Lodge I was the youngest member by 20 years and the youngest Mason in the country for at least my first year. At first it was all new and interesting, two Brethren had also been in the military so it wasn't so bad. It kind of filled a void which was missing since I left the military. I had no one to show me around at first, and no one was interested in visiting, so I went visiting by myself (also in the neighbouring countries).

My Lodge is a bit unusual as it's the only one working in English in this country so it tends to bring in a wide range of backgrounds and ages. The problem with that is that not many of us have much in common outside of Lodge. We meet twice a month.

After about 12 years I pulled the pin and joined another Lodge in another country and loved the experience. For various reasons I rejoined my Mother Lodge and am now in my second year as secretary.
 
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I think I heard one the guys talking about some of the London lodges. Some of them have high court judges and the likes, long waiting list to get into. The chances of progression would be very slow!
My lodge is mainly older people as I said before, but with the numbers dwindling down, it’s more emphasis on the newer guys to take up a new roll.
I’d be quite happy to be a steward for the rest of my time, attending when I can.
When you work shifts, have a family, it’s not always easy to commit to it.
How much do you all read up on it? Do you read on all the Solomon information? Freemasonry is literally a mine field of things to learn, it can be darn right over bearing!
I was meant to do my second degree in March, it was obviously cancelled. I’ve forgotten all the bloody questions and answers now, I haven’t been swatting up on it!
you could be me, same age, sounds like the same lodge.

you're not me are you?

although I was raised 2 whole days before the lock down kicked in (talk about skin of the teeth).

I'd hang in there and just be clear you're not in a position to do more than turn up and be a steward. 2nd degree is my favourite of the three, FWIW.

anyway, us younger ones are out there.
 
I disagree. I visited as an EA and FC unaccompanied.

You just have to email ahead and check that the ceremony is one you have already been through (although time with an experienced Brother outside of the Temple when you have to leave can be incredibly useful)

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When I was a very junior Mason and in the Navy, moving about, an old teacher of mine sorted out a couple of visits and got many invites around Wiltshire. This gave me confidence and moving to another area phoned a local Masonic hall. This got me several visits and not long after joined Queen Victoria Chapter in Plymouth. The majority of Masons are pleased to made visiters welcome.
 
When I joined my Lodge I was the youngest member by 20 years and the youngest Mason in the country for at least my first year. At first it was all new and interesting, two Brethren had also been in the military so it wasn't so bad. It kind of filled a void which was missing since I left the military. I had no one to show me around at first, and no one was interested in visiting, so I went visiting by myself (also in the neighbouring countries).

My Lodge is a bit unusual as it's the only one working in English in this country so it tends to bring in a wide range of backgrounds and ages. The problem with that is that not many of us have much in common outside of Lodge. We meet twice a month.

After about 12 years I pulled the pin and joined another Lodge in another country and loved the experience. For various reasons I rejoined my Mother Lodge and am now in my second year as secretary. As has already been said, being secretary a lot of work, especially if you have to clean up your predecessors mess.
Sarastro lodge?
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
I remember that G.L. sent us some Swedish Freemasons to visit our lodge , one of the lads was delegated to take them in the the preparation room and test them. Later on he said " they gave me all sorts of odd signs and stuff , I saw that they had their kit in their briefcases so i just said well done chaps".

We often used to have foreign visitors sent to us by head office .
 

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