Free 8 week meditation course at Sir Oswald Stoll Foundation, London, starts 18/07/11

#1
10.00am - 12 noon
MONDAY MORNINGS, 18 JULY - 05 SEPTEMBER 2011
'Peace of Mind': Eight week meditation course for military veterans and homecoming service-people led by the London Meditation Project

Includes a special day on Monday 25th July with Vietnam War veteran Claude AnShin Thomas, author of 'At Hell's Gate' - free copies of his book are available: contact info@londonmeditationproject.org

On this eight week course you will have the opportunity to learn meditations that can help you connect with your own calm and inner resources. Supportive and respectful training in deep relaxation, meditation and mindfulness-based stress reduction, developing skills to relax more deeply, manage stress and begin to heal invisible wounds of war, in the company of a group of other veterans and service-people.

Please do your best to commit to attending for the whole eight week course: there will be a process of learning and sharing that will work best with full attendance.

Sir Oswald Stoll Foundation, 446 Fulham Road, SW6 1DT, 020 7385 2110, and on Monday 25th July only, we will be at West London Buddhist Centre, 94 Westbourne Park Villas, London W2 5EB

Cost: there is no charge for this course: donations are welcomed
Please book in advance: places are limited. Book via: London Meditation Project | Peace of Mind: Meditation Events

For more information contact the London Meditation Project
info@londonmeditationproject.org
 
A

Aleegee1698

Guest
#2
Thats so kind of you Kate, do you really want to go down that road again.............
 
#4
Thats so kind of you Kate, do you really want to go down that road again.............
What road was that?

Meditation isn't some airy fairy nonsense any more. It has been scientifically proven to have many psychological and physiological benefits. It became science once they were able to measure the effects of meditation. A few examples from the top of my head (and will be googable) are brain scanning techniques. A US University got a sample of students to be brain scanned, and they then underwent an 8 week course in daily meditation. At the end of the course, they were brain scanned again and there were physical changes within the brain. This re-wrote the medical books because prior to which it was thought once the brain was a certain age, it was 'fixed'; but now they know it's plastic.

Other experiments have been to measure cortisol levels; cortisol is a stress hormone. It's found that after a period of meditation that not only have cortisol levels significantly decreased, that they also remain lower for several hours.

And mindfulness based stress reduction techniques is pretty mainstream psychiatry these days; I know for a fact that it's used to treat depression with some success.

This course can't be a 'bad thing', and may change people's lives.
 
#5
Naïveté is strong in this one, yes.

Well, this couldn't have come at a better time. Housework is done, husband is sedat... fed, tonight's television is utter rot.

Let me see now; cold glass of wine, comfy chair, plenty of cigarettes.... Play on.
 
A

Aleegee1698

Guest
#6
What road was that?

Meditation isn't some airy fairy nonsense any more. It has been scientifically proven to have many psychological and physiological benefits. It became science once they were able to measure the effects of meditation. A few examples from the top of my head (and will be googable) are brain scanning techniques. A US University got a sample of students to be brain scanned, and they then underwent an 8 week course in daily meditation. At the end of the course, they were brain scanned again and there were physical changes within the brain. This re-wrote the medical books because prior to which it was thought once the brain was a certain age, it was 'fixed'; but now they know it's plastic.

Other experiments have been to measure cortisol levels; cortisol is a stress hormone. It's found that after a period of meditation that not only have cortisol levels significantly decreased, that they also remain lower for several hours.

And mindfulness based stress reduction techniques is pretty mainstream psychiatry these days; I know for a fact that it's used to treat depression with some success.

This course can't be a 'bad thing', and may change people's lives.
No, I totally agree, anything that can alieviate someones suffering, or at least make them believe that, is a Godsend.

I cant find the other thread where Kate was trying to ply us with rubbing us up with Buddhas and virgin Olive Oil, this obviously got Kate a grilling, and my post related to this.
 
#8
10.00am - 12 noon

Includes a special day on Monday 25th July with Vietnam War veteran Claude AnShin Thomas, author of 'At Hell's Gate' - free copies of his book are available: contact info@londonmeditationproject.org
He sounds like an interesting fella...

From September 1966 to November 1967, Thomas served as a helicopter crew chief in the Vietnam War. He began as a door gunner with the 90th Replacement Battalion in Long Binh and was next assigned to the 116th Assault Helicopter Company in Phu Loi where he began using the M60 machine gun during their runs.

On one ground patrol, Thomas and four other men in his unit were fired upon by what appeared to be Buddhist monks carrying weapons beneath their robes. All five soldiers were wounded in the attack, and three died.[8]

As a soldier, Thomas killed several hundred Vietnamese people.[9] The helicopter crews he worked on contributed to betting pools on soldiers who could rack up the most kills.[10]

Thomas survived being shot down five times. The fifth time, in the summer of 1967, he was shot down in the Mekong Delta.[citation needed] The pilot and commander were killed and the gunner and Thomas were both wounded.[11] In addition to injuries to his shoulder and face, Thomas broke his jaw, cheekbones, ribs and neck, and split his sternum.[12] Thomas received 25 Air Medals, the equivalent of 625 combat hours, and the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Purple Heart military decoration.[13]
Claude AnShin Thomas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What do I do to get my free book? ;-)
 
#10
Hang about! I'm sure I've been here before. Oh yeah, Zen. Think of the tiger, the rock and the arrow. And the two priests crossing the river. Remember, Zen is..............
 
#12
Self help section. Think of a busy street, lots of traffic, buses, cars, guys and girls on bikes,people, mums with prams., dogs, cats. At the far corner is a red postbox.

Start mentally removing all the objects from the street. Do it in your mind. Eyes closed if it helps. When you have the street empty apart from the buildings, the road and the postbox, start removing those, leaving just the red postbox as the remaining picture in your mind.

Now remove the outline of the postbox so that you are seeing just the red colour. Fade that to gradually lightening shades of pink until it fades to a clear white.This is now like clear sky myopia that pilots suffer from at times.

You are now meditating, asleep, or dead..
 
#13
Warning: Never, ever, never, never, never think of onions, (YES, ONIONS) either just before or during any sessions of meditation. It will prevent true meditation taking place. Thinking of onions blanks meditation. Always remember this warning. Do not think of onions before or during meditation. Thinking of onions also prevents hypnotisn. At least, that's what W.O.1 xxxxxx(censored name) told us.
 
#15
Damn, I thought it was the "Modern Military Mother" telling us about some drivel that Hagar her husband has got up to to escape her demented witterings! :-(
 
#16
A friend of mine has a son; he's an ex infantry Warrior gunner and did his fair share of killing in GW2. Since leaving the forces he's went off the rails; he's been caught drink driving twice and nearly went to prison on the second occasion, but the judge took his war record into consideration.

He's still drinking heavily, he's still not working, he's still a complete nob. The guy in question won't seek help from anywhere because he believes all his problems are external ones (no-one will employ him in the jobs he wants to do, for example). He's divorced, has a small child he rarely sees and contributes nothing towards it's upkeep.

PTSD? I haven't a clue; he says he killed somewhere between 11 and 15 people in Iraq; he was about 20 at the time.

I bet there's a lot of ex-squaddies just like him, so if somone/an organisation is trying to help ex-forces, for no financial reward whatsover, it's a shame that we give 'em a hard time here.

And as someone who meditates myself, (and who will no doubt be thinking 'onions' later), I can see the real value and benefits that meditation can contribute to someone's general sense of well-being.
 
#17
A lot of us have ghosts. And, yeah, it isn't easy. Sometimes we all remember. We can joke about it as it sort of helps, but it's always there, in the background. Harder for some than others. But you'd have to be a prick not to think that it matters. For me it's been 57 years ago, but sometimes I can even see the guy's face. You just have to ******* hard it out. I don't think there's any easy way.
 
#18
I don't think there's any easy way.
Maybe, maybe not, but there is a way to put that sort of stuff down; to let it go. In fact that's what meditation can be about; letting go of negative stuff. It's funny, but I'm a Geordie; beer, sex, football, fighting, chips 'n' gravy; those were my natural pursuits, but finding myself in a mental tight spot, I ended up in a meditation class and it's really worked for me; and I'm no spiritual guru.

I do admit that meditation looks like it shouldn't work; I mean you just sit there (unless you're doing a walking meditation or something), doing nowt - what's that meant to do? But other things work that don't look like they're going to work. Take lager for example! If you tell someone whose never drank Stella before and can't dance that if they drink ten pints of the stuff, that they'll be better than Freddy Astair, they'll think yer daft; but it's true. Women look better too; I mean who'd've thought that even the unit clerk can look 'worth one' once you've had a skinfull? See what I mean; drinking looks like it shouldn't work, but it does. Meditation is the same.

William James said something clever that I can't quite recall about 'contempt prior to investigation' not being a smart thing to do, so, for anyone whose interested in meditation, even though you may think it doesn't look like it's going to work, try it.

I personally don't know how I managed to get along without it (actually, I was a bit of a mess myself, but that's my business).
 
#19
There's plenty of stuff on t'interweb showing some interesting scientific findings with regards meditation...

BBC News - Brains of Buddhist monks scanned in meditation study
BBC NEWS | Health | Meditation 'good for brain'
BBC NEWS | Health | Meditation lowers blood pressure

At worst, meditation may do nothing for you, at best it may change someone's life in a positive way.

It's a free course; what's there to whine about?
Remember seeing a documentary about this place. A rehab programme run by a Buddhist monk and former Swiss Amy Para for heroin addicts. Unlike traditional Western approaches it seemed to 'empower' the clients and achieved, what appeared to be, far better results. It is also free. :)

Drug and Alcohol Detox
 
#20
So is anyone going to come along to try a bit of meditation? Book via: London Meditation Project | Peace of Mind: Meditation Events

Meditation really is a very worthwhile practice to try out. Read what the soldiers say: London Meditation Project | Testimonials

On Monday 25th July 2011, for FREE, you can try learning meditation with one of the best meditation teachers I've ever met (and I have trained with a few), you will meet an extraordinary American Vietnam war veteran and meditation teacher in Claude AnShin Thomas, and I will be cooking a very good lunch.

Warm wishes,

Catherine
 

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