Fraudulent Car Insurance Applications

PeacePhlapps

Old-Salt
I’ve recently been having a problem with an unknown person who’s been applying, and often succeeding, in setting up car insurance policies using my name and address. I suspect a parcel delivery courier was originally responsible as the name format matches of the applications matches the informal first name I use rather than my official name. Date of birth is always guessed and often wildly wrong.

The underwriter of the most recent policy has just written to me to get details of a recent accident (which is nothing to do with me as I was out of country at the time) which has pissed me off even more than the rest.

Other than firefighting any letters that come from insurers, does anyone have any sage advice on proactively putting a stop to the policies being set up in the first place? I’ve already got a CIFAS protective registration marking on my credit file that should ensure insurers check and compare my full details rather than just the ones the scammer knows but sadly many insurers seem to pay feck all attention to it.

Cheers for any advice
 
It been my personal experience that insurance companies pay up even when they subsequently discover a claim is backdated, due to the claimant being so pissed off at being disqualified from holding or using a drivers licence that he got blathered driving home from court and lost a row with a wall. The companies argument , which scuttled the crown court trial of the claimant for deception, was that they would lose the defendants business if they voided his cover.

However....

Change your password monthly, buy Norton ( or similar). Go 'paper free' but still buy a shredder for all your paper waste, the slice n dice model, not the simple slicer.... and stop doing those "What is my Klingon Porn Star Name?" online quizzes
 
I’ve recently been having a problem with an unknown person who’s been applying, and often succeeding, in setting up car insurance policies using my name and address. I suspect a parcel delivery courier was originally responsible as the name format matches of the applications matches the informal first name I use rather than my official name. Date of birth is always guessed and often wildly wrong.

The underwriter of the most recent policy has just written to me to get details of a recent accident (which is nothing to do with me as I was out of country at the time) which has pissed me off even more than the rest.

Other than firefighting any letters that come from insurers, does anyone have any sage advice on proactively putting a stop to the policies being set up in the first place? I’ve already got a CIFAS protective registration marking on my credit file that should ensure insurers check and compare my full details rather than just the ones the scammer knows but sadly many insurers seem to pay feck all attention to it.

Cheers for any advice
@Arte_et_Marte I believe is your man. He did, I am pretty sure, work for the fraud department of a motor vehicle insurance company so he may have some insights to helping you out.
 

NSP

LE
Presumably this counts as identity theft and fraud and so should be a matter for the old bill?

You could try the Motor Insurer's Bureau:-
https://www.mib.org.uk/

And the Information Commissioner and possibly the Financial Ombudsman.

Home
Motor insurance
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
It might be worth checking your household insurance policy to see if you have identity theft cover.Secondly it might be worth buying one year only of one of the credit watch services that monitors any new bank/credit etc applications made in your name
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
I had someone of "Eastern European" origin, set up a motor policy using his name but my address. A bit stupid, as, of course, the letters arriving at my house were a bit obvious. The insurance company "Go Skippy" could not have been less helpful, to the point of being positively obstructive. Firstly they refused to deal with me, quoting the usual "..data protection.." excuse, even when I maintained that it was my data that they were not wanting to divulge. After a couple of formal GDPR applications, they finally relented said that they had simply "cancelled the policy".

I asked them what they had done, or were doing, about the scroat in question, but again got the usual ".. can't tell you due to data protection.." which needed a further GDPR which simply said "..we have passed it to our fraud inverstigation team..", which, it turned out, meant they had passed it to their underwriters. The refused to give me the contact details of this Investigation team.

Reporting to the Fraud Action line etc is a waste of time as no actual fraud (i.e. financial loss) had taken place against me. My local Police were not interested for the same reason.

Finally my only "closure" of the case was to get a written assurance from Go Skippy that they no longer held any details about me, or my address, and had not raised any adverse reports against my address with the Motor Insurance Bureau.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
@NSP has got this covered. This does sound like I/d fraud and not a pure motor vehicle fraud problem. An Insurer, or anybody else you do on-line business with, has no idea who "you" are and can only deal with the information in front of them.

You must tell your insurer what is going on (the fact your dodgy delivery name and no date of birth is a massive help here) and get them to cancel that insurance. All Insurers have a motor fraud office, or immediate access to a third party company. You may have more luck than @chimera above.

My main concern would be telling the Police as soon as possible and see what they have to say.

@Effendi Obliged old boy.
 
I’ve recently been having a problem with an unknown person who’s been applying, and often succeeding, in setting up car insurance policies using my name and address. I suspect a parcel delivery courier was originally responsible as the name format matches of the applications matches the informal first name I use rather than my official name. Date of birth is always guessed and often wildly wrong.

The underwriter of the most recent policy has just written to me to get details of a recent accident (which is nothing to do with me as I was out of country at the time) which has pissed me off even more than the rest.

Other than firefighting any letters that come from insurers, does anyone have any sage advice on proactively putting a stop to the policies being set up in the first place? I’ve already got a CIFAS protective registration marking on my credit file that should ensure insurers check and compare my full details rather than just the ones the scammer knows but sadly many insurers seem to pay feck all attention to it.

Cheers for any advice
Let the DVLA know as well. I had something similar (V5 registered to my address but had nothing to do with me). They were pretty helpful.
 

PeacePhlapps

Old-Salt
@chimera that sounds exactly like my situation. Some insurers, Aviva and Lloyd’s for example, have been excellent in dealing with it but others have been utter pants. I’ve run into the whole “data protection” ballache too - one company sent me some screenshots of an online application but redacted everything meaningful, even my own name.

I’ve found the Noddle / Credit Karma website pretty invaluable in keeping track of searches - there has been a peak of applications in January / February last year and this which enabled a bit of proactive contacting of insurers.

My biggest gripe, other than with the cu nt that’s doing it, has been the failure of insurers to use their own tools to properly verify identity of online applications. The CIFAS scheme of protective marking is supposed to address this very issue. Seems like a basic step that would make their own business simpler and more profitable.
 

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