France v Italy - Handbags at Dawn

#41
Theres me thinking this belonged in the six nations thread.
Perhaps the running of the Eu could be decided by a rugby tournament? The loser have to leave or pay reparations and get no votes for a year! The winners get to do what they want?
The Italians I met in Rome when I went there for the 6N considered the French as their 'dirty cousins' and the team they most want to beat.
 
#42
Marcon is the arch-proponent for a United States of Europe. The anti-EU government in Italy is opposed to the entire idea.

Italy is of the opinion that it's euro membership is the reason for Italy's economic stagnation since Italy joined the euro. They are trying to kick start the Italian economy with a splurge of government debt that would make Gordon Brown green with envy. It bids fair to drive Italy's debt dynamics to a point where it can no longer service it's debt. Although it will fornicate the euro longer term, the first thing bad Italian debt will do is wipe out France's banking system.

Bloomberg - Are you a robot?

View attachment 376610

If the Italian banking system gets into trouble:


The Italian banking system is guaranteed to get into trouble in the next recession.

Marcon is aware that the course of action Italy is embarked on is almost certain to fornicate France as well. And the Italian blame the euro (proponent for even more Euro - Marcon) for their economic woes.

Aren't you glad we're leaving the EU, before this particular fuster cluck comes to full flower.

Wordsmith
You have to wonder why French banks have brought what I am guessing are Italian bonds and ploughed so much money in to Italian banks, its a crazy figure and yes France and French banks must have twitching rings.

Macon is really having a fun time being king of the castle in France, next time round the French are going to say stuuf you and vote Le Pen, they have tried every other alternative.
 

DAS

Old-Salt
#43
What I know about the machinations of international banks in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg you could write on an ant's left ball. What can you tell us?

Looking at the graph again I see that France and Ireland have greater exposure.

Did you read the FT article?

Juencker has a personal stake in Brexit - what possible interest has he in making it an orderly process?
No try again.

M = Million
B = Billion - that's x9 zeros
 
#45
From the link;
"They violate the respect that is owed to democratic choices made by a nation which is a friend and an ally".
Can't have that can we.
 
#48
And Britain will be blamed - for everything.....one is prompted to remember the profound words of Lord Grimsby at such times:

' Fook 'em '




Useful graph....so if the Italian banks go t1ts up (AGAIN) the country with the largest exposure is...LUXEMBOURG?

Where, by some strange coincidence, our greatest admirer Jean-Claude Juencker hangs his hat?

LuxLeaks: Luxembourg’s response to an international tax scandal | Financial Times

Some connection possibly?

say it ain't so Mo!
That post reminded me about something I heard about Juncker and his rise to infamy....
Jean Claude made a speech in 2017 calling for closer tax harmonisation -
-
EU should enforce rules to prevent vetoes on tax reforms - Juncker | Reuters


But go back further in his past in his role as PM of Luxembourg raises some awkward issues. From 1995 to 2013 Juncker turned Luxembourg in to Europes largest tax haven.
-
Jean-Claude Juncker's real scandal is his tax-haven homeland of Luxembourg

The supporting BBC article is linked below
-
UK companies cut secret tax deals

Although both articles are a few years old it does bring the old adage about shitting on your own doorstep to mind.
 
#49
Actually, I have always felt that the Italians have had an unfair rap for military ineptness, based almost solely on their rather understandable lack of enthusiasm to die for Il Duce during the Second Great Unpleasantness. Even then, the buggers in Keren put up one hell of a fight.

The French on the other hand, only did well when led by an Italian Corsican or when we had a nutter like Henry VI on the throne.
 
#50
Actually, I have always felt that the Italians have had an unfair rap for military ineptness, based almost solely on their rather understandable lack of enthusiasm to die for Il Duce during the Second Great Unpleasantness. Even then, the buggers in Keren put up one hell of a fight.

The French on the other hand, only did well when led by an Italian Corsican or when we had a nutter like Henry VI on the throne.
Or that tiny little skirmish they had at Verdun!
 
#51
Actually, I have always felt that the Italians have had an unfair rap for military ineptness, based almost solely on their rather understandable lack of enthusiasm to die for Il Duce during the Second Great Unpleasantness. Even then, the buggers in Keren put up one hell of a fight.

The French on the other hand, only did well when led by an Italian Corsican or when we had a nutter like Henry VI on the throne.
. . . and the Greeks in 1940-an utter shambles.

FFS, what sort of army are you if you're getting buttocks kicked by this:

 
#53
Actually, I have always felt that the Italians have had an unfair rap for military ineptness, based almost solely on their rather understandable lack of enthusiasm to die for Il Duce during the Second Great Unpleasantness. Even then, the buggers in Keren put up one hell of a fight.

The French on the other hand, only did well when led by an Italian Corsican or when we had a nutter like Henry VI on the throne.
I brought my first car of an ex Italian POW who had been caputured by the Allies in North Africa, he had no time for Germans and said they the ordinary soldier just were ill equipped for the desert whilst the officers had traveling brothels and wine cellars.

Add to that they had a good 1st WW
 

Sadurian

LE
Book Reviewer
#55
. . . and the Greeks in 1940-an utter shambles.

FFS, what sort of army are you if you're getting buttocks kicked by this:

Any army brave enough to prance about in that gear in full view of the general public is either a collective Friend of Dorothy or not to be messed with.

I'm reminded of the 3rd Foot and Mouth.
 
#57
. . . Add to that they had a good 1st WW
Errm, actually no, they didn't-well, not for the most part.

Up to mid-1917, the Italian Front was very much a war of attrition, with both the Italian and Austro-Hungarian armies as inept as each other. As usual, the PBI (on both sides) suffered from almost criminal mismanagement of operations. After having almost knocked the Austrians to a standstill, the Germans had rush reinforcements to the area to prevent a collapse.

The Italians, in turn, almost capitulated and many Italian units suffered from low morale and localised mutiny. Both Britain and France were then obliged to send reinforcements*.

It only started to come good for them at the Battle of Vittorio Veneto ( October–November 1918 ).

. . . still, given the conditions that the poor buggers had to fight in, I'm not surprised that they got the hump.



*a distant Gt Gt Uncle won a good MC there with HAC, having already picked up a DCM as a BSM with HAC in France,
 

Pob02

LE
Book Reviewer
#60
I reckon it depends on where one lives and who ones friends are. I can imagine that someone who has retired to a part of Spain or France and has put all their savings in a house, or someone working in the EU would want to stay. Where I live it is a very international community (i.e. not just EU member state nationalities) and the majority of my British friends have all lived or worked outside the EU at some stage.
Of course it is going to depend on who you knock about with.

FYG I work for a large multinational, who have "kindly"had me working in both Switzeralnd (where I lived over the border in France) and Spain.
Both offices were very international in work-force make-up, and both city locations were/are very international in demographic content.

The point I make is that your observation is not, necessarily, giving a complete picture.
 

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