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France to Increase Defence Budget

The good thing is that you don't need to go very far to find WW1 battle sites. There used to be an NCO in my Coy who would take advantage of the days off to search former hospital sites. He would return with buttons and all sorts of paraphernalia discarded almost a century ago (it was the early 2000s)


A UK colleague and I stopped to pay our respects at the French military graveyard at Jonchery-sur-Suippes. A very moving experience.
 
There is a also a Russian Orthodox Church and cemetery near Mourmelon. Russian soldiers of the Russian expeditionary Corps who were KIA were buried there.

 
There is a also a Russian Orthodox Church and cemetery near Mourmelon. Russian soldiers of the Russian expeditionary Corps who were KIA were buried there.


Unfortunately, I didn't get the opportunity to visit it. President Macron decided to close your borders from noon on St Patrick's Day, so my oppo and I left after breakfast on the day before. I had originally been hoping to visit Rheims Cathedral too.
 
Unfortunately, I didn't get the opportunity to visit it. President Macron decided to close your borders from noon on St Patrick's Day, so my oppo and I left after breakfast on the day before. I had originally been hoping to visit Rheims Cathedral too.

Yes, it was the beginning of confinement in France.

On the road to Rheims, the Fort de la Pompelle museum has one of the largest collection of WW1 German helmets.

 

Ned_Seagoon

War Hero
I know, it's one of the 60-odd LOs and exchanges. One of the recently arrived even has the good taste to have French as a surname. You can't really ask for much more...
Ha. Then the appointers are maintain a good tradition. The Bleep in Rennes a few years back was called France.
 
........ On the road to Rheims, the Fort de la Pompelle museum has one of the largest collection of WW1 German helmets.
Any of them purple by any chance?
 
A little more detail, and focus on Franco-US cooperation.

'After decades fighting guerrillas and terrorists, France is refocusing on Russia and China with increased budgets, intensified training, stronger divisions, and new armored vehicles — much like the US. But the French approach is still very different.

'The French and US armies have exchanged general officers to coordinate preparations for the Warfighter 21-04 exercise beginning next April. France is increasing its defense budget for the first time after decades of decline, and it’s eager to collaborate with the US against both Russian and Chinese threats. But that doesn’t mean buying US weapons, copying US doctrine, or embracing America’s obsession with high technology.

“The French army has maybe a less technophile approach than other armies,” said Maj. Gen. Michel Delion, who heads the French Army’s Center for Doctrine & Command Teaching (CDEC). Yes, working together with the US requires interoperability, Delion told an Association of the US Army webinar this morning. But even more important, he argued, is the human dimension, which requires ramping up officer exchanges. A French one-star general is now deputy commander of the US Army 3rd Division, and since January, an American two-star has served as deputy commander of France’s 3rd Division, which will operate as a subordinate unit to the US Army III Corps in Warfighter 21-04. (Warfighter exercises are all-out stress-tests for command posts, not live field exercises for rank-and-file troops, whose participation is largely simulated).

“Our challenge is not technical,” agreed the US two-star, Maj. Gen. Todd Wasmund. “Most of our challenges have to do with our policies,” he said, which often prevent the two armies from sharing information – particularly intelligence data – even when their technologies are technically capable of exchanging it. That said, there’s still plenty of technical nitty-gritty to work out. But the French see the solution in implanting common technical standards, not in buying the same hardware. It’s better to pursue “compatibility of standards” than to buy “standardized equipment,” Delion said. Future threats and crises will be diverse, he argued, so the allied nations need to maintain a diversity of different approaches to match, rather than attempt to clone the US.

'Sure, the two industrialized democracies are adopting broadly similar approaches to similar threats. Both are struggling to implement new strategies focused on deterring conflict with great powers even as they remain enmired in counterinsurgency and counterterrorism commitments around the globe. “For 2019 alone, we’ve suffered 23 killed in action and more than 500 wounded,” Delion said. (The US lost 22 killed in Afghanistan in 2019, 12 in Iraq, and five in Syria).'


Budget Up, French Army Preps For Major Wargames With US
 
A little more detail, and focus on Franco-US cooperation.

'After decades fighting guerrillas and terrorists, France is refocusing on Russia and China with increased budgets, intensified training, stronger divisions, and new armored vehicles — much like the US. But the French approach is still very different.

'The French and US armies have exchanged general officers to coordinate preparations for the Warfighter 21-04 exercise beginning next April. France is increasing its defense budget for the first time after decades of decline, and it’s eager to collaborate with the US against both Russian and Chinese threats. But that doesn’t mean buying US weapons, copying US doctrine, or embracing America’s obsession with high technology.

“The French army has maybe a less technophile approach than other armies,” said Maj. Gen. Michel Delion, who heads the French Army’s Center for Doctrine & Command Teaching (CDEC). Yes, working together with the US requires interoperability, Delion told an Association of the US Army webinar this morning. But even more important, he argued, is the human dimension, which requires ramping up officer exchanges. A French one-star general is now deputy commander of the US Army 3rd Division, and since January, an American two-star has served as deputy commander of France’s 3rd Division, which will operate as a subordinate unit to the US Army III Corps in Warfighter 21-04. (Warfighter exercises are all-out stress-tests for command posts, not live field exercises for rank-and-file troops, whose participation is largely simulated).

“Our challenge is not technical,” agreed the US two-star, Maj. Gen. Todd Wasmund. “Most of our challenges have to do with our policies,” he said, which often prevent the two armies from sharing information – particularly intelligence data – even when their technologies are technically capable of exchanging it. That said, there’s still plenty of technical nitty-gritty to work out. But the French see the solution in implanting common technical standards, not in buying the same hardware. It’s better to pursue “compatibility of standards” than to buy “standardized equipment,” Delion said. Future threats and crises will be diverse, he argued, so the allied nations need to maintain a diversity of different approaches to match, rather than attempt to clone the US.

'Sure, the two industrialized democracies are adopting broadly similar approaches to similar threats. Both are struggling to implement new strategies focused on deterring conflict with great powers even as they remain enmired in counterinsurgency and counterterrorism commitments around the globe. “For 2019 alone, we’ve suffered 23 killed in action and more than 500 wounded,” Delion said. (The US lost 22 killed in Afghanistan in 2019, 12 in Iraq, and five in Syria).'


Budget Up, French Army Preps For Major Wargames With US
I had to check first to make sure this was in the public domain, but the techy interoperability would appear to be largely solved by Federated Mission Network (FMN) doctrine.

Linky
 
I had to check first to make sure this was in the public domain, but the techy interoperability would appear to be largely solved by Federated Mission Network (FMN) doctrine.

Linky

Bowman.:D:eek::D
 
Detail, aspiration or political bellicosity?

'France’s next-generation aircraft carrier will be nuclear-powered and replace the national fleet’s flagship warship, the Charles de Gaulle, in 2038, President Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday.

'The 11th carrier-vessel in the French Navy’s history will be built by French defence contractor Naval Group and equipped with the new electromagnetic aircraft launch system developed by U.S. company General Atomics, French officials said. The carrier will be 300 metres (984 ft) long and have a deadweight of 75,000 tons. It will be able to carry up to 30 Rafale fighter jets or the successor of the Dassault warplane currently being developed by France, Germany and Spain.

'The French military had initially lent towards a ship with conventional propulsion, but together with Macron later opted for a nuclear-powered vessel, despite heavier construction costs, for technical and strategic reasons. “Out strategic future, our status as a great power, lies with the nuclear industry,” Macron said during a visit to a nuclear sector components maker.

'France is continental Europe’s only nuclear power. Britain is a nuclear power too, though its relationship with the European Union - from trade to security - once it leaves the EU’s orbit on Jan. 1 remains uncertain. The French state will invest one billion euros during the first development phase that will end in 2025, the Ministry of Armed Forces said. Ministry officials declined to comment on media reports that the vessel could cost more than 5 billion euros ($6.05 billion).

“Naval Group is very proud to build the largest warship ever built in France”, the company CEO, Pierre Eric Pommelet, said in a statement. Three other Western aircraft carriers have been built since the Charles de Gaulle was first deployed. The U.S. Navy’s Gerald R. Ford and America, and the British Royal Navy’s Queen Elizabeth, which cost about 3.1 billion pounds ($4.03 billion).'


France's next-generation aircraft carrier will be nuclear-powered, says Macron
 

Tuffty

War Hero
We've tried it at some length...it doesn't, even with the Turks and they are nails at radio.

Forget that, what I meant to say was, "Hahahahahahahahahahahaha! Bowman? Hahahahahahahahahahaha!"
i worked for GD on the Bowman project and your right, what a load of blx that was/is. the cheapest kit from the cheapest bidder. Same old Same old really me thinks. It did piss me off when the Canadian GD experts came over driving round in their 4 x 4s staying in posh hotels with their wifes and they still couldnt get it to work properly and us the Brit GD Staff stuck in transit accm on salisbury plain.
 

Bob65

War Hero
The carrier will be 300 metres (984 ft) long and have a deadweight of 75,000 tons. It will be able to carry up to 30 Rafale fighter jets

It's a curious evolution in modern carrier design, the old rule of thumb used to be roughly an aircraft per thousand tons of carrier. Even the old Invincibles could carry 18 Harriers if required to, weighing in at 20,000 tons. But the QEs are designed for 36 F35s and these for only 30. Half the aircraft per weight than earlier designs. What are they doing with the extra tonnage?
 

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