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France and Russia in the 21st C. ?

The Russian PR machine is very aware of the attraction that many in France feel for Russia.

RT has a number of reports on Normandie Niémen, Napoléon or recently a ceremony on honor of recently dug up French KIA of the Crimean war.

Because of the annexation. of Crimea there was no official French delegation to the reburial ceremony.


 
When they do show any semblance of doing do, come the cries of "they're throwing their weight around again" and "Fourth Reich" und so weiter

How convenient. "I wish I could come and fight but I can't because you don't want me to".

Actually, we'd love you to but you are too busy shielding behind the Grundgesetz to actually do anything useful.

Growing a pair would be nice
 
The Russian PR machine is very aware of the attraction that many in France feel for Russia.

RT has a number of reports on Normandie Niémen, Napoléon or recently a ceremony on honor of recently dug up French KIA of the Crimean war.

Because of the annexation. of Crimea there was no official French delegation to the reburial ceremony.


Didn’t many Poles (then under Russia) leave for France and Belgium, mainly for mining and steelworking? I’m curious as to how this might work - treating a Frenchman who died in Crimea with the influx of Polish/Russian workers into France?
As I say, just curious if anyone can throw light on this curious movement of people.
 
Didn’t many Poles (then under Russia) leave for France and Belgium, mainly for mining and steelworking? I’m curious as to how this might work - treating a Frenchman who died in Crimea with the influx of Polish/Russian workers into France?
As I say, just curious if anyone can throw light on this curious movement of people.

There were several waves of Polish immigration to France, starting in 1830 all the way to WW2, but apart from a sizable number of White Russians fleeing the October Revolution, there was no Russian immigration to speak of in France.
 
The PCF leader Maurice Thorez had enough skeletons in his cupboards to be kept in check by de Gaulle and then his successors .

Agitation, pressure, strikes yes but the only attempted Coup of post WW2 in France was caused by the Right, not by the PCF.
I said during WW2, not after. Moscow’s aim was to be on the Channel by 1943. Other events precluded that.
 
France is annoyed at Germany's refusing to shoulder the international responsibilities that come along with its wealth and economical clout.
So are the Poles (well perhaps not as much the current government).
 
There were several waves of Polish immigration to France, starting in 1830 all the way to WW2, but apart from a sizable number of White Russians fleeing the October Revolution, there was no Russian immigration to speak of in France.
Thanks. As I say, Poles escaping Russians (who occupied them). One can still encounter many Polish surnames in northern France, which I find interesting.
 
There were several waves of Polish immigration to France, starting in 1830 all the way to WW2, but apart from a sizable number of White Russians fleeing the October Revolution, there was no Russian immigration to speak of in France.
That’s because they weren’t allowed to leave Russia.
 
There were several waves of Polish immigration to France, starting in 1830 all the way to WW2, but apart from a sizable number of White Russians fleeing the October Revolution, there was no Russian immigration to speak of in France.
Thanks. As I say, Poles escaping Russians (who occupied them). One can still encounter many Polish surnames in northern France, which I find interesting.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/France–Poland_relations

A former Polish King, Stanislaw 1st (Leszczynski), was made Duke of Lorraine in France.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
How convenient. "I wish I could come and fight but I can't because you don't want me to".

Actually, we'd love you to but you are too busy shielding behind the Grundgesetz to actually do anything useful.

Growing a pair would be nice

That's a bit unworthy @fantassin - While we were in Helmand, and you were in Kapisa, the Boxheads were in Kunduz, stepping up to the plate.


I recently characterised Macron as 'un Enarque' to someone else...does this help or hinder him with the French public these days?


For the uninitiated - ENA

ENA, the Ecole Normale d'Administration, one of France's top "grandes écoles". Founded in 1945, the ENA was set up as a school, open to all, for the training of uncoming generations of hauts fonctionnaires (top civil servants) to run France's public sector. However the school also trains future leaders of industry, and many top French politicians, including four presidents, are alumni of the school. Originally located in Paris, the ENA is now in Strasbourg, the capital of Alsace. The network of graduates, known as Enarques, is one of the cosiest and most influential old-boy (and old-girl) networks in France.
In 2019, responding to years of criticism that the ENA has outlived its function and is now perceived as an instrument for the benefit of the elite, President Macron, himself an alumnus, pledged to abolish it. No date has been set.

Enarque, Graduate of the Ecole Normale d'Administration. See ENA.
 
That's a bit unworthy @fantassin - While we were in Helmand, and you were in Kapisa, the Boxheads were in Kunduz, stepping up to the plate.
As I understand it @fantassin ’s main beef is not with the troops, but with their political masters.

The German troops had a steep learning curve in Afghanistan and were not permitted to apply the lessons learned.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Legendary and therefore probably mythical T-Shirt though

' Further East than Grandfather got......'
 
As I understand it @fantassin ’s main beef is not with the troops, but with their political masters.

The German troops had a steep learning curve in Afghanistan and were not permitted to apply the lessons learned.

Germany has been "parking" units abroad for decades with very little tactical effects on the ground

Just look at MINUSMA for example. The British contingent which will deploy to Mali in the coming months will soon find out....
 
Not as interesting as the number of Waffen SS soldiers who had apparently Polish surnames.
Probably the most notorious was Bach-Zelewski who commanded the suppression of the Warsaw Uprising. Another was Skorzeny. But it’s not just in those units, but across German society as a whole.

Herein lies the kernel of the idiotic racial superiority fallacy (or phallusy, as it really is an ideology of Pimmelkopfen). Over the centuries there has been much mixing of German and Pole (and generally Germanic and Slav. In the first millennium AD, the West Slavs had settled as far West as the Elbe valley and the Baltic coast as far as the Danish peninsula. Many German place names in this area are of Slav origin. The Lusatian/ Sorbian language (Luzycki) remains an officially recognised language in Germany.

Since WW2 many Poles have settled in Germany and the trend accelerated after Poland joined the EU. Poles assimilate well into similar cultures as France, the USA and the U.K. have discovered.
 
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Probably the most notorious was Bach-Zelewski who commanded the suppression of the Warsaw Uprising. Another was Skorzeny. But it’s not just in those units, but across German society as a whole.

Herein lies the kernel of the idiotic racial superiority fallacy (or phallusy, as it really is an ideology of Pimmelkopfen). Over the centuries there has been much mixing of German and Pole (and generally Germanic and Slav. In the first millennium AD, the West Slavs had settled as far West as the Elbe valley and the Baltic coast as far as the Danish peninsula. Many German place names in this area are of Slav origin. The Lusatian/ Sorbian language (Luzycki) remains an officially recognised language in Germany.

Since WW2 many Poles have settled in Germany and the trend accelerated after Poland joined the EU. Poles assimilate well into similar cultures as France, the USA and the U.K. have discovered.
I think there was a lot of mixing in Pomerania and those Eastern Provinces of German that went to Poland in 1945. Although most Germans fled or were forced out, I have come across a few young Poles with German surnames.

Even some officers and men of the Leibstandarte who would have joined pre-war when they had to show their familly lineage back to a couple of hundred years as a condition of entry had Polish surnames.
 
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