Fracking? Frack off...

#4
It can have all the sodding graphs it likes. Frack away Baby, Frack away!
 
#5
Well written article. What's a "thrid"?

The US Naval Air Weapons Station already relies on a 14 megawatt array of solar panels in California's Mojave desert for a thrid of its power. Pearl Harbour will soon follow as the Pentagon goes off-grid, better shielded from enemies.
 
#6
Well whoop dee do. Solar cells work in places with lots of sun, that exactly isnt here is it CC? Also, how will electricity help my gas boiler run? We need gas as well, that is the reality.
 
#8
well the chinese are going after a Thorium Salt reactor at the moment which they have 20,000+ years worth of supply for.
We could have done this years ago, if there had been the political will to back the research. But no, as long as Cameron's Father in Law is making lots of money it's sodding windmills.
 
#9
Well whoop dee do. Solar cells work in places with lots of sun, that exactly isnt here is it CC? Also, how will electricity help my gas boiler run? We need gas as well, that is the reality.
Yes, true, but you'd dismiss anything which would offset the need for gas would you? We do get a summer - occasionally - and we even get the odd sunny day in the winter. And, as DesktopCommando notes, other options are available in terms of power generation... or would be if there was the political will.

But, no, let's just crack on as we are, eh? Not for us independence from the vagaries of the Middle East or Russia.

If we, the electorate, keep ignoring stuff like this the donkeys in Parliament will drag their feet when it comes to making it happen.
 
#10
Or perhaps we stop wasting time and money on bollocks that won't work and work on with fossil fuels until new breakthroughs that actually work.

Sent from my HTC Wildfire S A510e using ARRSE mobile app
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#11
Yes, true, but you'd dismiss anything which would offset the need for gas would you? We do get a summer - occasionally - and we even get the odd sunny day in the winter. And, as DesktopCommando notes, other options are available in terms of power generation... or would be if there was the political will.

But, no, let's just crack on as we are, eh? Not for us independence from the vagaries of the Middle East or Russia.

If we, the electorate, keep ignoring stuff like this the donkeys in Parliament will drag their feet when it comes to making it happen.
If solar worked and was cheap guess what'd be on my roof.
 
#12
Daily Turdgraph employs unpaid intern, on zero hour contract, to make up bullshit headline for article written by scientifically illiterate former social anthropologist, who has typed an article parrot fashion, in the hope of increasing internet traffic.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#13
Daily Turdgraph employs unpaid intern, on zero hour contract, to make up bullshit headline for article written by scientifically illiterate former social anthropologist, who has typed an article parrot fashion, in the hope of increasing internet traffic.
Yup, now about that coal I'm sat above.
 
#14
Or perhaps we stop wasting time and money on bollocks that won't work and work on with fossil fuels until new breakthroughs that actually work.

Sent from my HTC Wildfire S A510e using ARRSE mobile app
Not while we are closing perfectly good power stations, without replacements, to satisfy some bollocks EU Carbon Target. :rage::rage::rage:
 
#15
Or perhaps we stop wasting time and money on bollocks that won't work and work on with fossil fuels until new breakthroughs that actually work.

Sent from my HTC Wildfire S A510e using ARRSE mobile app
...except that this stuff will work, it's being made to work. Materials research is moving on.

Read the article: $400 to deliver a gallon of fuel to a FOB. That's a hell of a money (and energy) saving in a military context. It's directly translatable into a civil context. Granted, it may not work on all days in all places in the world, but it'll work on a good many in a good many. And that reduces overall dependence on fossil fuels and the vagaries of the regimes which sit on top of them. Oh, and it's cleaner - the burning has already been done in that power station which is 90-odd million miles away.

Why does it matter if it's not directly usable by everyone all the time? People used to make the same point about spray-on deodorants and creating a hole in the ozone layer - 'What difference does me using a spray-on make?'... the answer is/was 'Not much, but several million or a few billion people using them makes quite a difference.'

Still, I guess it's easier to knock.
 
#16
If solar worked and was cheap guess what'd be on my roof.
"The US Energy Department expects the cost of solar power to fall by 75pc between 2010 and 2020. By then average costs will have dropped to the $1 per watt for big solar farms, $1.25 for offices and $1.50 for homes, achieving the Holy Grail of grid parity with new coal and gas plants without further need for subsidies."

...not really making solar 'work' has been the biggest obstacle to its use. But the state of the art is advancing. Now, about that coal...

Daily Turdgraph employs unpaid intern, on zero hour contract, to make up bullshit headline for article written by scientifically illiterate former social anthropologist, who has typed an article parrot fashion, in the hope of increasing internet traffic.
I'm sure Ambrose Evans-Pritchard would be delighted to be called an unpaid intern. His write-up says rather different.

Christ, at this rate you lot'll be having it that the car'll never replace the horse. Internal combustion? Pure snake oil.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#17
They've been whining about alternative energy such as solar power since I was in short trousers. It's always jam tomorrow but we've to pay for it today.
If all these things were so good the tax payer wouldn't be paying, private companies would.
Save money, get a coal fire, take your longest holiday in the coldest months, go abroad.
 
#18
I don't get the "...off-grid, better shielded from enemies" bit in the article. The 14MW array at Nellis AFB covers 140 acres apparently (not exactly hard to hit.)
 
#19
I don't get the "...off-grid, better shielded from enemies" bit in the article. The 14MW array at Nellis AFB covers 140 acres apparently (not exactly hard to hit.)
There's a difference between a FOB and an RPG and an enemy with the ability to strategically bomb the mainland US. Oh, and it means that Nellis, for instance, isn't connected to the civilian grid and so is self-sufficient from within its own boundaries.

(But, agreed, 140 acres is a large target. :-D )
 
#20
...except that this stuff will work, it's being made to work. Materials research is moving on.

Read the article: $400 to deliver a gallon of fuel to a FOB. That's a hell of a money (and energy) saving in a military context. It's directly translatable into a civil context. Granted, it may not work on all days in all places in the world, but it'll work on a good many in a good many. And that reduces overall dependence on fossil fuels and the vagaries of the regimes which sit on top of them. Oh, and it's cleaner - the burning has already been done in that power station which is 90-odd million miles away.

Why does it matter if it's not directly usable by everyone all the time? People used to make the same point about spray-on deodorants and creating a hole in the ozone layer - 'What difference does me using a spray-on make?'... the answer is/was 'Not much, but several million or a few billion people using them makes quite a difference.'

Still, I guess it's easier to knock.
Really? You are trying to use numbers for the fuel needs and incurred costs of a FOB to compare households in Britain? Please walk away and give your head a wobble. The $400 saving is not directly translatable, it is partially and also fractionally. The costs incurred there are lower here and also many of the reason are non existent here. That rather throws the economy argument into a bit of a spin.

I will not disagree with the need for renewables and also the need to diversify our fuel supplies. However, solar is of very little use here (you say so yourself) especially when balanced with the costs. Hydro, wind and nuclear are of much more use to us. And we still also need a gas supply.

Not knocking, just your evidence and argument dont match up. If your point was the advances in the technology and energy security then fine. But how does FOB solar link up to UK Fracking?

FHA - Off the grid and shielded i think refers to if something did happened to their national grid then the bases could still function with their own supplies. As well as one less access point for hackers if any linkage to the grid has remote access controls.
 

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