Four more years of below inflation rises

Maple

LE
Naah, we'll take it *********** as usual....perhaps, as we're all in this together, MPs and senior management (private and public sectors) will volunteer to take the same percentage and pay any surplus into a civil fund?

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Haven't those chavs in the HoC just been awarded 11%? Course they're up in arms about it and no doubt the odd one or two will tell us they tried to refuse it but it will be forced on them. :cool:
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Haven't those chavs in the HoC just been awarded 11%? Course they're up in arms about it and no doubt the odd one or two will tell us they tried to refuse it but it will be forced on them. :cool:
The MP's pay review body that's totally independent worked out they needed more than anyone else. The greedy pigs.


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the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
York council (Labour) leader was on the radio a while back on about this and how the nasty Tories where cutting everything.
When challenged about the state of the roads he said youi can have Adult social care or potholes we can't do both.
Then reitterated about how it was the Tories who were holdiny backk on pay rises not them.

Turned out not only could you have your road dug up twice and relaid if you were on the Tour De France route.
Adult social care has two "specialist advisers" on £1500 per day and another on £700 per day.
Perhaps if they looked into some of the saleries they are handing out they might need to give the ordinary workers a fair wage.
 
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jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
They don't like it? Then they're more than welcome to come work in the private sector where a pay rise is a thing of Myth.

No? Not interested?
Then less whining and back to work!
Really? Nobody in the private sector had a pay rise ?


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PappaBear08

Old-Salt
A huge and massive 1%. Which is 1% more than most wage-slaves I know.
Although i won't see any of that fantastic amount until I actually get cleared to return to work (circa end Sept)

My wife's colleagues are getting all twisty-knickered over their teaching salaries not rising, PRP being introduced etc etc... but they keep very quiet about the fact they receive increases through seniority/auto-advancement through pay-bands...

She got 4.5%

So while I laze around between physio/hydro and OHT appointments, she gets the beers in :D
 
If inflation=x, pay increases above x lead to y. Y being inflation greater than x. Government employees therefore can't get a raise above x.

Me no understandy why this is too difficult to grasp. Private sector employees take a risk on any pay rise at all, and have, on the whole, far less job security.

Risk=reward; or failure. In general, public sector=minimal risk, therefore lower reward.

I'm 45. I'd either have been an LE Capt or a recently retired WO, had I stayed in (joined at 22). But I left at 32 as a Sgt. Things have worked out for me. But there's been times when I wondered where my mortgage payment was coming from. Not to denigrate those who do full careers - they make plenty of sacrifices to do so.

Ultimately however, I would have an issue with public sector pay increases being above inflation, without corresponding "special" reason.
 

Maple

LE
Me no understandy why this is too difficult to grasp. Private sector employees take a risk on any pay rise at all, and have, on the whole, far less job security.

Really? Are you still living in a 1970s time warp? I work for the Rozzers, have done for eight years, just about everyone is on a de-facto year's rolling contract, subject to departmental review. With the underfunding of police forces departments have been cut for no better reason than 'money needs to be saved' or central government has changed and pulled funding and therefore x is no longer flavour of the month (not no longer required or useful, binned because of political views) Job security my arse - I'm an analyst by training - and a bloody good one according to the MoD and the Rozzers, but I'm working as a glorified file clerk because twice departments I have been in suddenly vanished due to budget constraints (only to be put back together 6 months later using regular officers at great expense - different budget you see)


So private sector employees are the only ones taking risks? No, most of the shitty work practices have transferred over from that sector to us, with the added annoyance of pay freezes to aid the political ambitions of a government that stated 'we're all in this together'.


Don't get me wrong, I don't expect the private sector to be dragged down to our level in the name of equality, I'd just like people to understand the public sector is not some feather-bedded rest home immune to 'market forces' or whatever else is being used as justification to screw down wages and that there is no 'life tenure,' the most you can hope for is an annual letter at Christmas stating that you'll still have a job in April

And I've no intention of striking - That never seems to do anything but give power to the Trots, Sparts and any other left-wing group unable to get political power by the nomal democratic measures
 
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There is, of course, another factor to be considered.

We have a Government that is continually spouting off about how good things are and how good things are going to be in the near future. Apparrantly the economy is on the up, jobs are being created at a huge, almost unprecedented rate. All is rosy.

Let me make it quite clear at this point, I am not a civil servant. Never have been, never will be. So I'm not one of the ones about to strike.

Unrest in the Civil Service is going to grow, it is going to get quite nasty. They why's and the wherefores I'll leave for others to discuss. However, the issue is, and will be, that when the Civil Service and other public sector workers strike, and they will, possibly big time over this, it is us that will pay the price.

It is an ill wind and all that, but the private sector will also be hurt by this. People will have to take time off from work to look after their children when schools close over industrial action. The Armed Forces will have to cover for other parts of the public sector. We already have a fire service that is taking industrial action (albeit for two hours a day, just to flex their muscles), I predict more.

I fully, totally, appreciate that restraint is called for, that to balance the books we need to be very careful, however, perhaps we need to look at other, unintended consquences of this model and what it might just cost the country as a whole if things turn nasty.
 

S0I

LE
Its the civil service that provides the 'glue' that holds all those public services the 'private sector' hold so dear together.
Do you REALLY want the people who supply the basic functions of society in a permanent state of rebellion and unrest?
Daily Hate rather forgets that reality.
 
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Really? Are you still living in a 1970s time warp? I work for the Rozzers, have done for eight years, just about everyone is on a de-facto year's rolling contract, subject to departmental review. With the underfunding of police forces departments have been cut for no better reason than 'money needs to be saved' or central government has changed and pulled funding and therefore x is no longer flavour of the month (not no longer required or useful, binned because of political views) Job security my arse - I'm an analyst by training - and a bloody good one according to the MoD and the Rozzers, but I'm working as a glorified file clerk because twice departments I have been in suddenly vanished due to budget constraints (only to be put back together 6 months later using regular officers at great expense - different budget you see)


So private sector employees are the only ones taking risks? No, most of the shitty work practices have transferred over from that sector to us, with the added annoyance of pay freezes to aid the political ambitions of a government that stated 'we're all in this together'.


Don't get me wrong, I don't expect the private sector to be dragged down to our level in the name of equality, I'd just like people to understand the public sector is not some feather-bedded rest home immune to 'market forces' or whatever else is being used as justification to screw down wages and that there is no 'life tenure,' the most you can hope for is an annual letter at Christmas stating that you'll still have a job in April

And I've no intention of striking - That never seems to do anything but give power to the Trots, Sparts and any other left-wing group unable to get political power by the nomal democratic measures
Fine points all. The fact remains though - public employees will not get above inflation pay rises.
 

Maple

LE
I know....and it's how life goes for now, and I'm glad to be working even if I'm £5000 pa down on where I was in 2008. My point is that the public sector, frequently used as a whipping boy by the right is not the safe, cosy world some would have you believe

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The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Its the civil service that provides the 'glue' that holds all those public services the 'private sector' hold so dear together.
Do you REALLY want the people who supply the basic functions of society in a permanent state of rebellion and unrest?
Daily Hate rather forgets that reality.
A good analogy. Of course, just enough glue in just the right place makes everything hold together nicely. Too much glue or applied in the wrong place just gums everything up and makes a right old mess.
 
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Fine points all. The fact remains though - public employees will not get above inflation pay rises.
Not unless another political party with a differing view were somehow to gain control of the government.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
I always impressed upon No1 son the desirability of waiting until he was 40 to buy a house. The boy duly did, he's now risen to high management and can afford to buy what he wants without any financial stress. Houses are not investments, they are somewhere you live.
Houses can indeed be investments but it depends on what you do with them. I don't think your advice to buy a house at 40 is good. What someone spends on rent they could have paid a mortgage. My house has trebled in value in 20 years so I'm glad I bought when I was quite young.


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