Foundation Property Maintenance course

Has anyone on here used the Building Heroes from Wiltshire College as a means to gaining quals and a job? If so what was it like, was it worth it. Any insight would be appreciative. I'm considering a career change, after loosing my father to lung cancer a month ago I've started to look at my life and realised I'm going nowhere fast and the job I'm in (security) is just soul sucking.

Their web sight is here: Veterans I would probably have to obtain funding for the course, but they can assist with that I think. I don't have ELC's.

I'm also considering doing distance learning courses, maybe in plumbing, gas, or locksmithing.

Mod's feel free to smite or move this post.
 
Speak to them mate. You never know.

I’m pretty sure it’s funded for people like yourself.
 
I was not in your situation, I fell out of university and decided, for a couple of reasons, that I was going to be fixing up houses full-time. I considered all the trades available and decided that plumbing and gas was possibly the biggest, most expensive part of any work I would have to pay for so I chose that.

I was situated so that I more, or less had three colleges within traveling distance, all offering plumbing and gas. I visited, chose the one I liked most and had a chat with the course manager and asked him how long it would take to walk out with a city & guild plumbing, along with the then CORGI gas qualifications. One academic year he told me, which in reality is around nine months. The course I did was full-time, five half days a week, mornings. Afternoons I did my thing fixing up the current house project. True enough after nine months I had finished the C&G and passed all the gas qualifications - first time. I went on to do the advanced plumbing C&G the following year which concentrated on large system design (blocks of offices & flats, warehouses, and other large projects viewed from a supervisory/management perspective.

If I may say, these generalist courses are fine if you want to learn a bit of everything, and a lot of nothing. Ideally suited to someone who is fixing up a house, or wants to be the junior Mr. Fixit for a maintenance company, basically fetching, carrying, and passing the right sized hammer to the qualified bloke.

Immediately after the plumbing course one of the blokes who was on it with me did the sparkys course - I did the sparkys course after I moved to the USA. Out of the two trades, plumbing and sparky, if I had to recommend one to my lad to go into I would tell him to go and be a sparky. It is more often cleaner, more often less physical, and more often pays more than plumbing - people are more scared of electric than water, so they will pay more. Just like the plumbing chitty if you go and speak to your local college you will likely find that you will get the first sparky C&G after an academic year and can be out earning money working with a company. And, that is not mentioning the jobs you pick up on the side for <cough> cash where you are easily trousering 30 to 40 quid an hour.

The other reasoning behind me saying sparky is that there is a move away from gas to electric. This has become very apparent to me looking at the property market in France for my impending retirement gaff. Additionally global warming will produce a need for air conditioning specialists as places have longer, warmer summers - aircon blokes can also install combo aircon/heat pumps which seem to be becoming popular. So if you could do an aircon qual alongside the sparky course it would not be a waste of time.

Bottomline: Go get a trade, it is not rocket science, they are always in demand, and they can pay well.
 
I was not in your situation, I fell out of university and decided, for a couple of reasons, that I was going to be fixing up houses full-time. I considered all the trades available and decided that plumbing and gas was possibly the biggest, most expensive part of any work I would have to pay for so I chose that.

I was situated so that I more, or less had three colleges within traveling distance, all offering plumbing and gas. I visited, chose the one I liked most and had a chat with the course manager and asked him how long it would take to walk out with a city & guild plumbing, along with the then CORGI gas qualifications. One academic year he told me, which in reality is around nine months. The course I did was full-time, five half days a week, mornings. Afternoons I did my thing fixing up the current house project. True enough after nine months I had finished the C&G and passed all the gas qualifications - first time. I went on to do the advanced plumbing C&G the following year which concentrated on large system design (blocks of offices & flats, warehouses, and other large projects viewed from a supervisory/management perspective.

If I may say, these generalist courses are fine if you want to learn a bit of everything, and a lot of nothing. Ideally suited to someone who is fixing up a house, or wants to be the junior Mr. Fixit for a maintenance company, basically fetching, carrying, and passing the right sized hammer to the qualified bloke.

Immediately after the plumbing course one of the blokes who was on it with me did the sparkys course - I did the sparkys course after I moved to the USA. Out of the two trades, plumbing and sparky, if I had to recommend one to my lad to go into I would tell him to go and be a sparky. It is more often cleaner, more often less physical, and more often pays more than plumbing - people are more scared of electric than water, so they will pay more. Just like the plumbing chitty if you go and speak to your local college you will likely find that you will get the first sparky C&G after an academic year and can be out earning money working with a company. And, that is not mentioning the jobs you pick up on the side for <cough> cash where you are easily trousering 30 to 40 quid an hour.

The other reasoning behind me saying sparky is that there is a move away from gas to electric. This has become very apparent to me looking at the property market in France for my impending retirement gaff. Additionally global warming will produce a need for air conditioning specialists as places have longer, warmer summers - aircon blokes can also install combo aircon/heat pumps which seem to be becoming popular. So if you could do an aircon qual alongside the sparky course it would not be a waste of time.

Bottomline: Go get a trade, it is not rocket science, they are always in demand, and they can pay well.
Thanks. Ironically my dear old dad was a sparky for 40yrs.
 

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