Formula 1 - 2018 season

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
You can go to the BBC F1 page and they have live commentary on the race. I was listening on my iPad but then decided to buy a NOW TV day pass and watch on Sky.
same. for the price of a pint and a half it removes the aggro of trying to find a reliable feed.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
those trophies are fcuking awful looking things
 
Was that the race where title momentum swung firmly towards Lewis? An unforced mistake from Vettel cost him points yet again; shades of last year?

IMHO the Merc looked truly mighty yesterday; plenty of pace and they hooked together strategy right through Practice, getting the Q2 tyre right and nailing pole. They’re set up beautifully for Austria and Silverstone; two more power circuits where that new 2.1 engine can shine.

How tf was Vettel driver of the day? HIt two cars on Lap 1 and pulled a shocker on Alonso.
 
It seems like "first lap" is a legitimate excuse to get away with anything.

If Vettel had done that on any other lap, it would have looked like a professional foul. Imagine if he were to race on an oval!

If the white lines were concrete walls, they all would have driven differently. A bit like the Porsche curves at LeMans, now there is a run off, they take more risks.
 
How tf was Vettel driver of the day? HIt two cars on Lap 1 and pulled a shocker on Alonso.
How did he get away with only a five second penalty when he knocked Bottas completely out of contention?

And then I remember which team employs him...
 
How did he get away with only a five second penalty when he knocked Bottas completely out of contention?

And then I remember which team employs him...
The FIA?

There have always been accidents in F1; drivers are on the limit, especially at the start. But this wasn’t a startline accident. Great drivers manage avoid the sort stupidity that costs them points. Vettel doesn’t.

Vettel’s accident is the kind of muppetry that you can forgive Max for; he’s only 20. But Vettel is a four times World Champion. He should be banking every point that he can.

It makes you realise how big the gulf is between our two four times champions. And Lewis never had a crash ridden start to F1; instead fact, he beat Alonso, who is supposedly half a second quicker than others.
 
The FIA?

There have always been accidents in F1; drivers are on the limit, especially at the start. But this wasn’t a startline accident. Great drivers manage avoid the sort stupidity that costs them points. Vettel doesn’t.

Vettel’s accident is the kind of muppetry that you can forgive Max for; he’s only 20. But Vettel is a four times World Champion. He should be banking every point that he can.

It makes you realise how big the gulf is between our two four times champions. And Lewis never had a crash ridden start to F1; instead fact, he beat Alonso, who is supposedly half a second quicker than others.
My offspring still calls them Ferrari International Assistance.
Vettel should have had at least a 10 second penalty for an obvious rash move.
 
I would have thought a drive through and Licence points would have been appropriate. The drive through would have been a fair punishment for the offence and the points would have been used to punish habitual infringements, if required.

"First lap" is no excuse.

An 8 year old kid starts karting, then moves up the ladder through the lower formulae, always knowing the rules from the first test session, flag meanings, track positioning etc. After 10 years of weekly racing to these rules, they move into F1. The rules change, this many position changes, this many waved blue flags, this delta time. The basic safety rules are reinterpreted, but, if these drivers are at the pinnacle, surely they should stick to the rules they all know.

I was involved in grass roots motorsport at a time when Senna and Schumacher became the role models for the younger generation, it didn't look pretty.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
I was involved in grass roots motorsport at a time when Senna and Schumacher became the role models for the younger generation, it didn't look pretty.
I don't know if you've read malcolm folley's book 'senna versus prost' (a very good read btw) - he makes the point that Senna, notwithstanding De Angelis' crash in testing in 86, never saw the consequences of a crash like Prost did in the late seventies and early eighties, and felt bulletproof in a car the way Prost never did. then of course Schumacher absorbs those lessons and again, never sees (thankfully) any downsides to barging people off the track in ways that would have seen people seriously hurt or killed at any point in the sixties or seventies, and thinks the only result of behaving like that on the track is going to be a bent chassis.


The FIA?
Vettel’s accident is the kind of muppetry that you can forgive Max for; he’s only 20. But Vettel is a four times World Champion. He should be banking every point that he can.
he's not as complete a driver as Lewis, absolutely. given reasonable parity in cars and engines, my money would always go on the no.44 car. I can't help but think part of his performance woes is the management at ferrari, which can best be described as erratic since ross brawn left. plus they don't have the experience that someone like Lauda brings to the team - he's been there, done that, seen it, and got several t-shirts. I would imagine when he speaks lewis and valterri listen, and what he has to say is worth listening to. I just don't see that kind of coaching (for want of a better word) being able to be given or even attempting to be given at ferrari.
 
so, Le Mans - can't help but thinking with the restrictions placed on the rest of the LMP1 field Alonso didn't have to work perhaps as hard as he would have had to if Audi and Porsche had been running in that class. I can't help but think if that was me I'd have felt the win was a little undeserved, perhaps. one thing that did strike me - seeing Zak Brown there in his capacity as owner of the UA team, if I was one of the Mclaren bods I'd have been thinking 'what are you doing there instead of doing the job you're paid for at Woking??'

so it's back to Paul Ricard this weekend - stories flying around about Danny Ric being offered £20 mill to go to Mclaren. I don't rule it out, but I don't think that would be a move to give him race wins, let alone a chance of the title. same with Ferrari, though to a lesser degree of hopelessness than Mclaren. plus I don't think Vettel would like having him as a teammate again, and Ferrari management seem to prefer a clearly delineated no.2 driver. so that leaves Mercedes...thoughts?
Dan Ric would be insane (or just doing it for the money) to go to Maclaren, they are a no hoper team at the moment. It does not matter which engine they have they have a dog of a car. Perhaps with a staff shake up they can turn it round but they need to serioulsy go into that organisation and weed out the dead weight, starting with Eric Boulier. The OCD corporate structure needs to go.

I don´t understand how anyone can be creative in that environment, they even measure the distance between chairs in meeting rooms.

Bright white offices and workshops that a guards RSM would be proud of but can you tinker with a bearing assembly in that kind of particle free workspace?

If you have not seen it, watch the documentary that they did for the start of the season, the 3 parter in which they did a hatchet job on Honda...only for Maclaren to be more or less just as bad without them.

Alonso, by now must have realised that it is just not going to happen for him at Maclaren but is worried that if he does leave, that will be the year when they sort it out. BY the time Maclaren become competitive again, if they do, Alonso will be too old to drive.

I would love to see him race at the front and fight for a WDC, more than any other driver I think he deserves it after all the bad luck he has had but his only realistic chance is to go back to Ferrari (unlikely) or Mercedes (slightly less unlikely but still).

Next year may be the year that Alonso goes to America.

Danny Ric, hopefully he will move and hopefully it will be to a race winning team, i think Kimi is just keeping a seat warm for his replacement, he is not showing any signs of his former glory and seems to have to appetite for it anymore.

But....the number two seat at Ferrari is career suicide and as long as Vettel is in good form, there is no chance of a number 2 Ferrari driver being able to compete fairly.

It´s a good problem to have but it´s still a tough one for Dan, RBM will more than likely drop in form with a Honda in the back so he seems a bit screwed at the minute.

What I would like to happen: Bottas dropped, RIC in his place. rest of drive rmarket shuffles accordingly.

What will probably happen: nothing and everyone will stay put
 
I don't know if you've read malcolm folley's book 'senna versus prost' (a very good read btw) - he makes the point that Senna, notwithstanding De Angelis' crash in testing in 86, never saw the consequences of a crash like Prost did in the late seventies and early eighties, and felt bulletproof in a car the way Prost never did. then of course Schumacher absorbs those lessons and again, never sees (thankfully) any downsides to barging people off the track in ways that would have seen people seriously hurt or killed at any point in the sixties or seventies, and thinks the only result of behaving like that on the track is going to be a bent chassis.
.
As someone said when Senna took Prost off in Japan "he wouldn't have done it if there was a wall next to the track".

I've seen people die right in front of me on the racetrack. I've driven the truck home not knowing if my driver was going to survive. From memory, Albers, Warwick, Fabi, Coulson, Rogers, Gartner, McArdle, Crankshaw have all perished at, or following, events that I have attended.

While we don't want to see injuries, the relative safety of the sport has harmed the driving standards.
 
Dan Ric would be insane (or just doing it for the money) to go to Maclaren, they are a no hoper team at the moment. It does not matter which engine they have they have a dog of a car. Perhaps with a staff shake up they can turn it round but they need to serioulsy go into that organisation and weed out the dead weight, starting with Eric Boulier. The OCD corporate structure needs to go.

I don´t understand how anyone can be creative in that environment, they even measure the distance between chairs in meeting rooms.

Bright white offices and workshops that a guards RSM would be proud of but can you tinker with a bearing assembly in that kind of particle free workspace?
The OCD approach goes back to Ron Dennis who had near infinite attention to detail. Their engineering facilities are not much different from any other racing shop in any serious series. Engineering hygiene is all important because that’s what delivers reliability. There’s not been much tinkering with bearings in any race shop since the 90s.

McLaren lacks clarity of leadership; Boulier is useless, they don’t have a clear engineering lead, Brown has his fingers in too many pies and Alonso is toxic.

A big clean out is needed, bringing the racing team back to the clarity of purpose it has under Dennis. They need to recruit; a top draw team principal and a engineering leader. And a driver who can actually be part of the team leadership in the way that Lewis is at Merc.
 
As someone said when Senna took Prost off in Japan "he wouldn't have done it if there was a wall next to the track".

I've seen people die right in front of me on the racetrack. I've driven the truck home not knowing if my driver was going to survive. From memory, Albers, Warwick, Fabi, Coulson, Rogers, Gartner, McArdle, Crankshaw have all perished at, or following, events that I have attended.

While we don't want to see injuries, the relative safety of the sport has harmed the driving standards.
IMHO carbon fibre was the game changer, when drivers started to survive the unsurviveable.

The injuries thing is interesting; F1 has gone from being the most dangerous international sport to one in which drivers have long careers without ever missing a race. The sports injuries that are familiar to any amateur sportsman don’t even occur. Very rarely is a career curtailed these days; a driver can have a 30 year career from karts to retiring without as much as a scratch.
 
The OCD approach goes back to Ron Dennis who had near infinite attention to detail. Their engineering facilities are not much different from any other racing shop in any serious series. Engineering hygiene is all important because that’s what delivers reliability. There’s not been much tinkering with bearings in any race shop since the 90s.

McLaren lacks clarity of leadership; Boulier is useless, they don’t have a clear engineering lead, Brown has his fingers in too many pies and Alonso is toxic.

A big clean out is needed, bringing the racing team back to the clarity of purpose it has under Dennis. They need to recruit; a top draw team principal and a engineering leader. And a driver who can actually be part of the team leadership in the way that Lewis is at Merc.
I have never thought of Lewis Hamilton as part of the leadership but i think i know what you mean. He heaps praise on his team members when they do well and even more when they do badly and although at times it seems forced, you can tell by looking at the mechanics after the races that they really are a unit and they get more excited than he does after a good result.

I dont think Alonso is as radioactive as the press make him out to be, he has had his moments yes but the main issues with having him on your team are going to be the sponsorship / commercial obligations that come with him and the potential for a difficult relationship with the other driver if he starts wiping the floor with them in the same way that Hamilton and Rosberg were at each others throats for 2 years.

The clean out at Maclaren has to be a top priority but with it´s Arab owners and bloated structure, it would be like trying to weed out the bad eggs at BT or Google, damn near impossible with all the bureaucracy and vested interests.

I personally would get rid of the top layers of management altogether but perhaps keep Brown to sell sponsorship. Everyone above department head would be gone and I would streamline those departments too.

You are right, they need a top team principle and a chief designer with some flair. Somebody like Christian Horner would be good, no nonsense, youngish and agile.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
I don´t understand how anyone can be creative in that environment, they even measure the distance between chairs in meeting rooms.

Bright white offices and workshops that a guards RSM would be proud of but can you tinker with a bearing assembly in that kind of particle free workspace?

If you have not seen it, watch the documentary that they did for the start of the season, the 3 parter in which they did a hatchet job on Honda...only for Maclaren to be more or less just as bad without them.
I was invited to the MTC about 5-6 years ago to interview for an IT role within the F1 operation - that definitely wasn't the impression I took away with me - if anything, just the opposite, but this was long before the current rot set in.. although to be fair, they did have a rule that the only thing you could have at your desk was a glass of water - at the time I was living off black coffee and I knew in my heart of hearts that it wasn't the place for me. still, the 'ten minutes look around' at the end of the meeting that turned into an hour's tour round the factory and the cars on display more than made the journey worth while. :)
 
I have never thought of Lewis Hamilton as part of the leadership but i think i know what you mean. He heaps praise on his team members when they do well and even more when they do badly and although at times it seems forced, you can tell by looking at the mechanics after the races that they really are a unit and they get more excited than he does after a good result.
I read a long interview with Toto Wolff last year in which he was very clear about Hamilton’s contribution and role in Mercedes’ senior leadership group. He’s consulted on strategic decisions and how he engages with even the most obscure parts of the business. I’ve read several articles about Merc’s collegiate approach to business leadership. They run a very different ship from their competitors.
 
The OCD approach goes back to Ron Dennis who had near infinite attention to detail. Their engineering facilities are not much different from any other racing shop in any serious series. Engineering hygiene is all important because that’s what delivers reliability. There’s not been much tinkering with bearings in any race shop since the 90s.

McLaren lacks clarity of leadership; Boulier is useless, they don’t have a clear engineering lead, Brown has his fingers in too many pies and Alonso is toxic.

A big clean out is needed, bringing the racing team back to the clarity of purpose it has under Dennis. They need to recruit; a top draw team principal and a engineering leader. And a driver who can actually be part of the team leadership in the way that Lewis is at Merc.
There is a beautiful part in Adrian Newey's book on how to upset Ron Dennis. You move one of the absolutely symmetrical piles of paper on his desk by a few millimetres. He will then spend the remainder of the meeting fretting over whether you have placed the pile in its correct position or moved it out of alignment.
 
I read a long interview with Toto Wolff last year in which he was very clear about Hamilton’s contribution and role in Mercedes’ senior leadership group. He’s consulted on strategic decisions and how he engages with even the most obscure parts of the business. I’ve read several articles about Merc’s collegiate approach to business leadership. They run a very different ship from their competitors.
I suspect that trickles down from Lauda. When driving he paid attention to the tiniest detail and got on well with his whole team.
 

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