Forgotten Wars

Hexi Bloke

War Hero
No: the British Government did recognise Partition with a medal or a separate clasp to the GSM.

However.

The independence of both nations was recognised by the institution of 2 medals to be awarded to the armed forces of both nations - attached British personnel were eligible for these medals. They were awarded in the names of the two new states and not by Britain:


So it was similar to the Kuwait medals issued after the Gulf War? Lads got the medals but couldn't wear them?
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
So it was similar to the Kuwait medals issued after the Gulf War? Lads got the medals but couldn't wear them?

Correct.

However.

:cool:

Those people who had been awarded the Kuwaiti and Saudi GW1 medals were authorised to wear them if serving in either Kuwait or Saudi on a official training tour or as a member of Embassy staff, etc.

Which came as something of a shock to a good friend of mine who, after a couple of promotions, managed to blag a training post to Kuwait. With a formal reception 2 days after he landed.

In best bib and tucker.

And all his bling.

Including the generous spangley acknowledgements from grateful allies.

Which he had (like everyone else) lobbed into a drawer/sold on Ebay.

Oh, how we larfed at his discomfort. :)
 
I wear mine on my pajamas.

1639528134713.jpeg
 
Why please?

Service in theatre during the lead up to GW1 was recognised with the The Gulf War medal without clasp.

Service in theatre from 16 Jan to 28 Feb 91 was signified by the clasp bearing those dates.

If you were lucky, and had landed in Kuwait on that BA 747, then you got a speshul clasp dated 2 Aug 90.

Service in theatre from 8 March to 30 Sep 91 earned you the GSM w/c 'KUWAIT'.

Thus, all UK service was recognised by the award of a UK medal* and is (occasionally shifting) UK policy not to 'double medal'.


*and some to Kiwis, Oz and (oddly enough) Roumanians - units that were OpCon UK.
 

Hexi Bloke

War Hero
Service in theatre during the lead up to GW1 was recognised with the The Gulf War medal without clasp.

Service in theatre from 16 Jan to 28 Feb 91 was signified by the clasp bearing those dates.

If you were lucky, and had landed in Kuwait on that BA 747, then you got a speshul clasp dated 2 Aug 90.

Service in theatre from 8 March to 30 Sep 91 earned you the GSM w/c 'KUWAIT'.

Thus, all UK service was recognised by the award of a UK medal* and is (occasionally shifting) UK policy not to 'double medal'.


*and some to Kiwis, Oz and (oddly enough) Roumanians - units that were OpCon UK.
Exactly, and no official British Medal for Bosnia, you got either/or both a UN or NATO medal and I think later there was some strange Article Medal and even possibly an EU Monitors Medal...strange old set up.
 
Exactly, and no official British Medal for Bosnia, you got either/or both a UN or NATO medal and I think later there was some strange Article Medal and even possibly an EU Monitors Medal...strange old set up.

Indeed: I've had some old crunt get in my face for 'double dipping' because of this

20191216_141551.jpg



My own Chest Of Great Fierceness includes both Gulf medal and the 'KUWAIT' clasp to the GSM.

'Oi!', says the gobshite, 'you can't do that!' Actually yes, you can, you smelly old man, because it was for 2 distinct operations.

As to UNPROFOR, it was much the same process: it being an operation under UN auspices, they got to hand out the bling so UK didn't need to recognise service there*.

For those lucky people who got to remain after peace broke out, they removed their bullet-proof light Blue berets and donned Regimental/Corps berets.

And, if they had the correct number of days, segued into another medal.

Meh. It's the way of the world: 2 separate operations without handing in your bedding.

*Korea was the adventure that raised 'double medalling' to a fine art: troops physically serving in Korea had service recognised with both the Queen's Korea and the UN Korea (the so-called 'Butcher's Apron'):

1639580743943.png
 

Hexi Bloke

War Hero
Indeed: I've had some old crunt get in my face for 'double dipping' because of this

View attachment 623205


My own Chest Of Great Fierceness includes both Gulf medal and the 'KUWAIT' clasp to the GSM.

'Oi!', says the gobshite, 'you can't do that!' Actually yes, you can, you smelly old man, because it was for 2 distinct operations.

As to UNPROFOR, it was much the same process: it being an operation under UN auspices, they got to hand out the bling so UK didn't need to recognise service there*.

For those lucky people who got to remain after peace broke out, they removed their bullet-proof light Blue berets and donned Regimental/Corps berets.

And, if they had the correct number of days, segued into another medal.

Meh. It's the way of the world: 2 separate operations without handing in your bedding.

*Korea was the adventure that raised 'double medalling' to a fine art: troops physically serving in Korea had service recognised with both the Queen's Korea and the UN Korea (the so-called 'Butcher's Apron'):

View attachment 623206
I was one of those that got the UNPROFOR and NATO Medal FRY, Ive had some stick over the years for it.
 

Hexi Bloke

War Hero
I remember some lads were in Cyprus when the Gulf War kicked off, they got the Gulf War Medal, but no Clasp. Something to do with being within SCUD Range....can that be true?
 
This Aden documentary being made about the interactions of British soldiers with the local populace may be one-sided

And I think, an element of exaggeration.

<<
Geoffrey explained how troubles had just started and they had to go and help out to stop the insurgents. He said: "I flew into Cyprus then from Cyprus to Kamaksa airport.
“All done at night because you couldn't land during the day. You get shot at all the time”.
He told how you had to get out of the aircraft while it was still moving and once out it would speed up and take off again.
>>

(My bold)
 
And I think, an element of exaggeration.

<<
Geoffrey explained how troubles had just started and they had to go and help out to stop the insurgents. He said: "I flew into Cyprus then from Cyprus to Kamaksa airport.
“All done at night because you couldn't land during the day. You get shot at all the time”.
He told how you had to get out of the aircraft while it was still moving and once out it would speed up and take off again.
>>

(My bold)

Hmm. You may have a point, given that Geoffrey cannot spell 'Khormaksar'.
 
Par Avion senior was a Flight Sergeant, Air Cargo, Air Movements at RAF Khormaksar in 1966/67. I don't know how him and his boys managed to offload and load the aircraft if they couldn't stop?
Yes, indeed.
I can't speak for the last part of the campaign which is why I emphasised his bit about the early part of the trouble; when despite the grenades and assassinations, many things, for example both RAF and charter airlines like British Caledonian. carried on pretty much as normal
Yes, our Geoffrey is swinging the lamp so much that you have to wonder whether he was actually there.
 

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