Forgotten military accidents.

Oyibo

LE
Snipped...

Plus the Herc hitting the lad stood on the 4 tonner was the other accident that stands out

I remember that. I heard one account (probably urban myth) that the bloke's head got caught in the slipstream by the tail ramp, and the loadie on the ramp needed counselling afterwards.

The less dramatic account:

 
...

Apart from showing the sacrifice of so many of various countries, there must be one or two interesting back stories there. Not least of all was the fact that of the 86 Poles, only two were before VE/VJ day.
The remainder all died within 1947, Jan to Dec.
The end date is an easy one, it coincides with the CWGC remit but why none in the last half of 1945 and the whole of 1946 - I'd guess that a resettlement camp was set up in Chester or nearby but 84 deaths in a year in peacetime seems quite a lot.

I wonder whether suicide became an issue, what with possible repatriations.
 
I'm open to be corrected, but WO1 RSM Green RA, killed in a freak accident on Batus about 1987. My understanding was that the Regt was drawn up for a photo from a Gazelle when the helicopter crashed when banking and the rotors clipped the ground. There was only one casualty, RSM Green standing to the front of the Regt and caught by a piece of debris. Tragic, and a good bloke.
 
On Thursday 21 December 1967 Avro Shackleton XF702 crashed on the eastern slopes of Creag Bhan in the Scottish Highlands killing all 13 crew on board. The RAF Kinloss MRT were dipatched to recover the bodies for burial and wreckage for analysis.

The recovery operation lasted some time around Christmas and new year and the account mentions searching a wide area for a part or parts that might have been lost from the plane. Among the team members was my late uncle, who always claimed he's got his third stripe after finding some 'secret equipment' out on the hills.
 
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Well I was aware of at least one WW2 Aircraft Crash on The Cheviot

Boeing B17-G Fortress, 303rd Bomb Group crashed The Cheviot, …16th December 1944

*** ETA ... my Avatar is the Trig Point on Windy Gyle
That was 44-6504, pilot Lt George Kyle.
They had set out to attack Ulm, but due to bad weather the mission was aborted and all aircraft were recalled.
Kyle was reluctant to jettison his bombs, as he could not see the ground or sea beneath him for a safe jettison and so took the decision to haul them back to Molesworth.
Navigation equipment became erratic, and the bomber flew into The Cheviot instantly killing the Bombardier and Navigator in the nose section. Kyle was very badly hurt when a propellor tore away and went through the cockpit.
In a snowstorm the survivors split into two groups.
A shepherd named John Dagg, and his collie, Sheila, heard the crash and set off to see if they could help. Fortunately the crew survivors had put a little distance between themselves and the wreck, as the bomb load subsequently blew up.
Sheila tracked down the group which included Kyle who had tried to shelter from the snow.
John Dagg, and another man named Frank Moscrop received BEMs for their part, and Sheila was awarded the Dickin Medal.

Dagg had previously received recognition from the RAF for giving similar assistance to other crashes.

Edit: Spellchecker change Dickinson Medal.
 
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Nothing to do with the Chipping Norton set or Diddly Squat Farm.
In the early hours of 21st August 1942 a Vickers Wellington bomber and an Airspeed Oxford trainer were involved in a mid-air collision North-West of Chipping Norton over open country. The Oxford was on a pilot training flight from No 6 Advanced Flying Unit, Little Rissington, whilst the Wellington was on a crew night training flight from No 15 Operational Training Unit based at Harwell. Both aircraft were destroyed by the impact.
 
RTFI.
 

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That was 44-6504, pilot Lt George Kyle.
They had set out to attack Ulm, but due to bad weather the mission was aborted and all aircraft were recalled.
Kyle was reluctant to jettison his bombs, as he could not see the ground or sea beneath him for a safe jettison and so took the decision to haul them back to Molesworth.
Navigation equipment became erratic, and the bomber flew into The Cheviot instantly killing the Bombardier and Navigator in the nose section. Kyle was very badly hurt when a propellor tore away and went through the cockpit.
In a snowstorm the survivors split into two groups.
A shepherd named John Dagg, and his collie, Sheila, heard the crash and set off to see if they could help. Fortunately the crew survivors had put a little distance between themselves and the wreck, as the bomb load subsequently blew up.
Sheila tracked down the group which included Kyle who had tried to shelter from the snow.
John Dagg, and another man named Frank Moscrop received BEMs for their part, and Sheila was awarded the Dickinson Medal.

Dagg had previously received recognition from the RAF for giving similar assistance to other crashes.

I was aware of some but not all of your Post ... I am sure when I was involved in taking a school party up College Valley many years ago there was a simple Memorial near Hethpool remembering that event ... later replaced by a more substantial one remembering all incidents in the Cheviots .
 
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I was aware of some but not all of your Post ... I am sure when I was involved in taking a school party up College Valley many years ago there was a simple Memorial near Hethpool remembering that event
A propellor blade set into a cairn was erected in the 1960s, together with an inscribed plaque. It was subsequently vandalized, and I do not know it’s present condition.
George Kyle, the injured pilot, lived until 2005 and by his request his ashes were scattered on the crash site. The family of bombardier/togglier S/Sgt Frank Turner, acquired one of Sheila’s pups in 1946 and took her to South Carolina.
 
I was on my Scout conversion course having my dinner in the mess when someone noticed a pillar of smoke coming from the hanger area. Didn’t think much of it until a REME RQMS came in and said “Well, that Lynx comp wash went well”

Comp wash = compressor wash. The engine is run and a wash solution is pumped in to clean the compressor blades. However this happened on the Lynx Intensive Flying Trials Unit as the aircraft was being tested prior to entering squadron service. Somebody got the procedure very, very wrong.

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I was on my Scout conversion course having my dinner in the mess when someone noticed a pillar of smoke coming from the hanger area. Didn’t think much of it until a REME RQMS came in and said “Well, that Lynx comp wash went well”

Comp wash = compressor wash. The engine is run and a wash solution is pumped in to clean the compressor blades. However this happened on the Lynx Intensive Flying Trials Unit as the aircraft was being tested prior to entering squadron service. Somebody got the procedure very, very wrong.
Techie chap looks nonchalantly at the comp wash rig...........
 

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Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
An incident that still occupies too much headspace.
Basically, as far as has been offered as the cause, the assault wave lifted off from the FARP en masse. In the ensuing dust cloud, in darkness, the pilot became disorientated and flew straight into the ground just after take off.

It was incredibly dark - no starlight and I'd actually taken rough compass bearings from a distant gas flare (very visible) to an abandoned Iraqi border post so that I could estimate where the gun line on Bubiyan Island was and where the refinery at Al Faw was because I was told to expect 'Shock and awe' from our veteran GW1 QMSI. Actually - couldn't even make out gun flashes due to the claggy darkness - I even accidentally fell in a trench earlier it was so black.
When the resultant fireball of the crash was seen - roughly in the right direction for Al Faw we actually assumed it may have been some serious ordnance and were out of our trench somewhat.
It took a couple of days for the news to filter through that it was one of our helos piling in and then, horribly, a few more days before finding out two guys I knew well enough were amongst the dead. Particularly tragic for a few reasons.
At the conclusion of hostilities I volunteered to get some plant on site to tidy up. A party of Booties had been over the site to a large extent.
My concept of 'forensics' changed considerably.
I had to get the first casualty report together in CENTCOM for that one.
 

Aquavite

War Hero
An incident that still occupies too much headspace.
Basically, as far as has been offered as the cause, the assault wave lifted off from the FARP en masse. In the ensuing dust cloud, in darkness, the pilot became disorientated and flew straight into the ground just after take off.

It was incredibly dark - no starlight and I'd actually taken rough compass bearings from a distant gas flare (very visible) to an abandoned Iraqi border post so that I could estimate where the gun line on Bubiyan Island was and where the refinery at Al Faw was because I was told to expect 'Shock and awe' from our veteran GW1 QMSI. Actually - couldn't even make out gun flashes due to the claggy darkness - I even accidentally fell in a trench earlier it was so black.
When the resultant fireball of the crash was seen - roughly in the right direction for Al Faw we actually assumed it may have been some serious ordnance and were out of our trench somewhat.
It took a couple of days for the news to filter through that it was one of our helos piling in and then, horribly, a few more days before finding out two guys I knew well enough were amongst the dead. Particularly tragic for a few reasons.
At the conclusion of hostilities I volunteered to get some plant on site to tidy up. A party of Booties had been over the site to a large extent.
My concept of 'forensics' changed considerably.
That night was almost complete darkness, literally couldn't make out my hand in front of my face. Only myself and driver had NVGs to get through the minefield breech. When I first turned them on I could see what seemed like the entire world's allocation of armour in extended line. Took my breath away thinking "fcuk, this is really happening".
 

syrup

LE


I had a couple of jollys in Pumas

One at Thetford where the TA guy fell out and one up at Catterick.
How more didn't crash I don't know some very skill full scary and entertaining flying on both rides.

Felt like we were very very low and fast, pulling up vertical and rolling onto the sides so we indoors were looking directly down to the ground again at low height.

Had a couple of Jollys in Blackhawks both of whom said they would give us a good ride and they were nothing like the Puma rides

Fantastic at the time but you read some of these and you think we might have been lucky in some of these trips.

I don't remember any of the helicopters in Iraq or elsewhere doing such violent manoeuvres
 
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