Forgetting your firearm

Lacking Moral Fibre

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
About 17 yrs ago me and 2 fellow ex TA RE drove over to the Somme battlefield one weekend. We rocked up at the huge Poziers British Cemetery early on the Sunday morning. Whilst we're looking at the map info board I noticed 3 weapons leaning against the inside wall of the entrance. One Lewis gun with magazine fitted, 1 x mauser rifle and 1 x French rifle.
We couldn't see anyone else but just assumed re-enactors were somewhere near, but after a few minutes we wandered over and started handling the weapons, all the working parts worked, when still no one else turned up I drove to the Le Tommy Café and the gendarme were called.
Apparently the South African memorial at Delville Wood had been broken into the previous night, various items were taken but it seemed the thieves changed their minds when it came to the weapons so they were dumped.
I did consider whether we'd have got away with driving them back to the UK?
 
I wouldn't be too sure of that. Sligthly off thread, but many years ago an RAF airman travelling by road to Berlin successfully missed the turn off at the autobahn junction and continued on to the polish border, where somewhat bemused East German border troops turned him round and pointed back in the direction of Berlin. There was also the occasional drunk who scaled the wall west to east and ended up getting arrested plus a short spell in an east german prison.
Good interview with historian Martin Schaad here, who investigated 410 cases of people who jumped west-to-east:

- Die Mauerspringer aus dem Westen

The most common day of the year for a wrong-way jumper was NYE, which speaks for itself. On the other hand there were some people who had previously escaped and were therefore banned from the DDR who became homesick in the west and tried to nip back over to see relatives.

Schaad found a total of four out of 410 who actually wanted to stay in the DDR, and none of them were allowed to do so. The DDR authorities were extremely touchy about anything that seemed to disrespect their sovereignty, and the border was very much that, so occasionally they even shot at people trying to get in.
 
More or less in keeping with the thread title, I can remember when doing anything with weapons in particular guard duties we guins* tended to be a bit nervous. This was simply because most of us only handled weapons two maybe three times a year. Patrolling or lurking at night most people actually taped up their mags lest they lose a round. Pouches with spare mags were checked, double checked and checked again. It became almost paranoid. I seem to recall that a lost round cost £ 60.00 back then, that's a lot of beer money.
However the most incidents were clocked up by the Rocks, who handled weapons almost daily. However RAFPol tried their best not to be outdone. Familiarity breeds comtempt, or just plain gash.

*Guin = penguin, as in all flap no fly.
 
More or less in keeping with the thread title, I can remember when doing anything with weapons in particular guard duties we guins* tended to be a bit nervous. This was simply because most of us only handled weapons two maybe three times a year. Patrolling or lurking at night most people actually taped up their mags lest they lose a round. Pouches with spare mags were checked, double checked and checked again. It became almost paranoid. I seem to recall that a lost round cost £ 60.00 back then, that's a lot of beer money.
However the most incidents were clocked up by the Rocks, who handled weapons almost daily. However RAFPol tried their best not to be outdone. Familiarity breeds comtempt, or just plain gash.

*Guin = penguin, as in all flap no fly.
not just RAFP, i know of MDP leaving a gun on a fire station,just as well his step son was on shift
 
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I did consider whether we'd have got away with driving them back to the UK?
The way to do it is:

1) first attract the attention of customs with a heavily loaded car full of duty free and camping gear piled up in the back
2) once stopped wind down the windows giving them a whiff of two sweaty blokes in a heat wave & foul cheeses, and a closer view of the wheelchair on top of the camping gear

Then you get waved out of the search bay
 
Some EOD weapons recoil a considerable distance, 50m+ in some cases, when placing a shot you not only have to consider the effects of disruption but where it will recoil, however sometimes you are limited with this and losing one is not an option. One such occasion occurred in FYROM, I was dealing with several RCIEDs along a road, the wheelbarrow failed after disrupting the first couple of devices so I had to manual the next one, it disrupted the device, but recoiled into the tree line, not too much of a problem as it still had the firing cable, so I just had to follow that. One slight problem was the presence of mines. I wasn’t too concerned as I picked my way through the trees, it was quite dense, difficult to navigate and therefore unlikely to be mined. I then came to a well worn track, however it didn’t look as if it had been used recently, greenery was starting to poke through the surface and there were no obvious foot, animal or vehicle tracks, it was also very uneven making it impossible to determine any groundsign to indicate the presence of mines.

It was at this point I realised the relevance of the standing broad jump test and I swear I must be the all arms broad jump champion (uncertified). I recovered the disruptor and returned the ICP.

I received numerous pats on the back (but no fücking medal) for dealing with RCIEDs without effective ECM, although I refused to admit the most dangerous part of the task was recovering that weapon.
 
we occasionally used the radio code word for officer, which is "Barzilan", which translates as Ironman, referring to the metal rank emblems on officer dress uniform epaulettes.
More common and convenient was to use the military acronym for an officer's role (similar to the way CO or OC are used).
I'm wondering whether the fact all teeth arms officers started as conscripts in the ranks has a bearing on the fact we don't have words like "rupert", which has a whiff of class distinction about it.....
I'm sure the term Barzilan has cropped up here before in another thread. But it reminds me of a term, not necessarily of endearment, used by the USAF. Many years ago on a multi-national unit I was working with a USAF Staff Sgt one day when we had visitors. Suddenly the Staffy said " Oh gee, look a budder bar". On asking for a translation into English I was informed that it was a reference to a Lt who had just one bar on his shoulder, a yellow one.

AL1. The RAF refers to officers as Rodneys, where the term comes from is lost in the mists of time.
 
I'm sure the term Barzilan has cropped up here before in another thread. But it reminds me of a term, not necessarily of endearment, used by the USAF. Many years ago on a multi-national unit I was working with a USAF Staff Sgt one day when we had visitors. Suddenly the Staffy said " Oh gee, look a budder bar". On asking for a translation into English I was informed that it was a reference to a Lt who had just one bar on his shoulder, a yellow one.

AL1. The RAF refers to officers as Rodneys, where the term comes from is lost in the mists of time.
Obviously Rupert's poor deluded and incontinent cousin.
 
I'm sure the term Barzilan has cropped up here before in another thread. But it reminds me of a term, not necessarily of endearment, used by the USAF. Many years ago on a multi-national unit I was working with a USAF Staff Sgt one day when we had visitors. Suddenly the Staffy said " Oh gee, look a budder bar". On asking for a translation into English I was informed that it was a reference to a Lt who had just one bar on his shoulder, a yellow one.

AL1. The RAF refers to officers as Rodneys, where the term comes from is lost in the mists of time.
Sorry for thread drift.

A yellow single bar would be a 2nd Lt. And the mythical reasons for why they should have a gold bar whilst the 1st Lt has only a silver one, are many, apparently.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
SAPS (SA Police Service) did the same in 1982. We (the Army) would capture suspected terrs and take them to the nearest cop shop, where they would do the interrogation. We had two suspects and there were two cops in their vehicle who agreed to take the suspects back with them. They left the two terrs in the back seat with the cops' weapons. Cue two dead cops and two terrs armed with an SMG, a R4 and two service pistols within walking distance of the border with Zimbabwe. Dunno why they didn't take the vehicle.
SAPS you say ?
In 1982 ?
Did they pitch in a yellow Tardis with a VRN ending in B ?
;)
 
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Losing firearms? Just rifles etc? Army load of light weights. If you're going to lose something do it in style.
Early ish 80s the CO of RAF Wittering was flying a range sortie in a Harrier GR3 when something went wrong, a bird strike I think, at any rate he had to terminate and return to Wittering PDQ, but due to engine problems he had to clear aircraft, that means that anything and everything dangling off the wings gets jetisoned. In this case SNEB pods, each containing 19 x 68mm rockets. I'm not sure if the pods were ever recovered as they went ballistic and buried themselves somewhere in the Lincolnshire countryside.
1586440080037.png
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Thicko cops have form. Used to have to carry one on the vehicle with us patrolling townships as campers and they were mostly OK, with a heavy scattering of utter arseclowns. Picked up an old lady after curfew one night, who the guys were just going to leave to go about her business. The cops were nominally in charge and this shithead insisted we take her in so she joined us in the vehicle.

Idiot cop spent the trip giving her a hard time and when we debussed at the cop shop, he tried shoving her. One of the guys caught her and helped her down but the cop woke up in the sick bay after landing face first on the tarmac.

We have no idea how that happened, although the DriFoot boot print between his shoulder blades may have been a clue.
NS cop ?
 

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt
...Certain pilot of rank keeping well back as a very flustered RSM went up and down the ranks inspecting ALL weapons. Turns out the pilot had left his personal weapon in the armoury and holstered a toy pistol that resembled a 9mm...
Attached to an RAF Harrier Squadron, my boss was the Ground Liaison Officer (GLO) an eccentric RTR Major. On exercises he would never draw his personal weapon from the armoury preferring to carry a plastic look-a-like Browning (Airfix kit?). His reasoning was that it was as much use as a real one and if he lost it no-one would care.

This resulted in pilots regularly appearing at our ops truck handing in “the GLO’s toy gun” which he had left in the mess tent again.
 
Aaand another lost something. Also many moons ago on detachment to Deci for the annual weapons practice camp, the aircrew practiced lobbing a variety of pracice bombs and 1000 lb HES, plus strafing with 30mm canon.
So there's me in the ops room, all very quiet and nothing going on. Suddenly 2 italian officers come into the room clutching a 30 mm cannon shell. On enquiring as to how I could help them the first one showed me the round and asked if it was ours. I looked at the case head and saw the letters RG. Definitely ours, but I did not say so and referred to them to our weapons officer, a certain FLt Lt Geoff M, who being Welsh had the gift of the gab and could talk the hind legs off a donkey. After what seemed like an eternity the 2 officers emerged from the QWIs office looking very puzzled and muttering something about "non e tedesco, non e italiano, non e inglese" followed by the italian equivalent of WTF. Shortly after Geoff M ermerged and I said nice one sir, he just grinned. From the armourers I knew that the Jaguar could under certain cirumstances eject a live round, in this case the round had been found on the runway.
Could have been worse, the SUU gun ejects several rounds before it starts firing, so the approach to the targets on the range gets littered with live 30 mm rounds.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Pressure vessels leak anyway and are continually topped up by filtered and cooled bleed air. Couple of small holes are not going to make a lot of difference.
What he said, the James Bond depressurisation doesn't happen.
Even larger holes are survivable, cases of explosions taking out sections of fuselage and the airframe being landed safely.

Probably because repair and recertification is expensive. Lots of wiring and plumbing under those panels.
What he said. Again.
I'm beginning to think he might know a bit about these taxis.

Remember where wpns point when emplaned on a chopper ?
While there is a certain amount of plumbing and wires under the floor, the powertrain tends to be upwards and if holes appear in it, the cooler fan might not work as intended causing the driver to sweat.
 

Blogg

LE
One day went as a guest to a shoot.

No real interest, just bring polite really.

Got there to find huge flap: "club equipment" had gone missing! Horror!

Much stress and general aggro from the Club Secretary, one of the type that you really don't want to have around in a crisis involving anything more than a broken paper clip.

No shooting had been done whilst he farted about attempting to identify the culprit or at least someone else to pin it on.

I asked my host what had gone adrift.

He replied through gritted teeth that it was a very serious matter: two shooting roll mats both of which were so old & grotty they were probably a hazard to health.
 

Issi

War Hero
Not a weapon, but lost the entire cam kit for a 4 tonner, cam net, 6ft poles, hessian etc, somewhere, on very busy roads, between Hildesheim and Detmold.
Nobody mentioned it, when I got back to camp, and so I surreptitiously loaded up with a whole new set from the camnet store.
They're probably still in a ditch in the Hameln area as we speak.
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Not a weapon, but lost the entire cam kit for a 4 tonner, cam net, 6ft poles, hessian etc, somewhere, on very busy roads, between Hildesheim and Detmold.
Nobody mentioned it, when I got back to camp, and so I surreptitiously loaded up with a whole new set from the camnet store.
They're probably still in a ditch in the Hameln area as we speak.
Seen a couple of cars marooned on top of cam nets.
One was on the M4 in Wales.
 
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