Foreign Walts

#1
Now that Walt Spotting has become the official Arrse sport, together with Mong Slapping and Chav Baiting, I was wondering about the international version of the game.

I have an American down my local who claims to be a Green Beret. Now if he clamed to be UKSF, I could probably suss him out. However I only have limited experience with US forces at all let alone SF. Do they even have a boat house at (is it?) Ft. Bragg?

My clues so far:
- Built like someone who doesn't take excercise for a living,
- Claims to have served in SE Asia & S America,
- Currently doing something with the FBI.

Help please.
 
#5
Is it an offence to walt it as a federal officer?

Fat or Skinny...

Take him for a run and see if he dies, oh in fact that might mean he is genuine US Army.
 
#6
Dear Passing Bells,

Tell him how very interesting and then ask him for more details, all the while making copious notes.
Then tell him that you just happen to be a friend of Lt Col Mark Harrington (or make up some name yourself) who's been in for donkey's and happens to command a Green Beret unit and that you'll ask said officer about all this at the earliest opportunity. Because you find it so interesting.
I had one of these saddos telling me all sorts of things until I used this ploy. It's amazing the speed at which they dissapear.

MsG
 
#7
Ask him about the million dollar shi##er at camp Mckall, which is the colorful description of the wash house / latrene. Candidates at selection also must handwash their uniforms in big ol' sinks on the outside of said shi##er , the location of the small AAFES/Px is right across from the chowhall.

That ought to be enough to sink him.
 
#10
The lads at Lightfighter.com could probably be your best bet for appropriate questions.

NTM
 
#11
aww come on! let them have their fun!

i know ill give people the 1000 yard stare when i say "yeah, i went to the 'Stan, man" (kazakhstan, exercise)

and the ladies will swoon, and the beer will flow and ill ave an 'ardon |-----------------------------------------------| that big!

:D
 
#12
There was a walt online the other eve who had me rocking with mirth when he informed me that;
A; he was with RLC....and based in Berlin.
B; i asked him what his BFPO was there, and he replied, whats 1 of those?

Yes seriously, well what could i do but lead him up the garden path before tripping him up at the front door?
 
#13
PassingBells said:
Now that Walt Spotting has become the official Arrse sport, together with Mong Slapping and Chav Baiting, I was wondering about the international version of the game.

I have an American down my local who claims to be a Green Beret. Now if he clamed to be UKSF, I could probably suss him out. However I only have limited experience with US forces at all let alone SF. Do they even have a boat house at (is it?) Ft. Bragg?

My clues so far:
- Built like someone who doesn't take excercise for a living,
- Claims to have served in SE Asia & S America,
- Currently doing something with the FBI.

Help please.
One simple question is to ask his specialty and MOS. It should be 18 series like 18E, 18C, 18B, 18D, etc., each corresponding to engineer, commo, weapons, etc. Ask what SFAS stands for (SF Assessment and Selection).

He should know where Camp Mackall is outside of Ft. Bragg, NC. Also ask which SF Group he was assigned to. These ought to be a start.
 
#14
PassingBells said:
Now that Walt Spotting has become the official Arrse sport, together with Mong Slapping and Chav Baiting, I was wondering about the international version of the game.

I have an American down my local who claims to be a Green Beret. Now if he clamed to be UKSF, I could probably suss him out. However I only have limited experience with US forces at all let alone SF. Do they even have a boat house at (is it?) Ft. Bragg?

My clues so far:
- Built like someone who doesn't take excercise for a living,
- Claims to have served in SE Asia & S America,
- Currently doing something with the FBI.

Help please.
Send me a PM with his full name, Special Forces Group(s) that he served in MOS, Rank and dates served in SF, as well as total time in service. (Or what ever data you can get and I'll check it out.)

Sadly, no boat House at Ft. Bragg, but there is a lake.. Mott Lake, were lots of demonstrations are put on by SF.

Most people who served in Vietnam were either in the 1st SFG(A) or more likely the 5th SFG(A). Most people who served in South American were stationed in Panama with the 8th SFG(A)

Ft. Bragg, NC is the home of the US Special Forces and the Airborne,:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Bragg,_North_Carolina

You also might ask him about the Flash he wore on his Beret.

http://www.globalspecops.com/patch/soflash/soflash.html
 
#15
Ask him what medals he earned while "over there." Then post them on Arrse for confirmation. If he says a posthumous Medal of Honor, then he is a fecking walt.

That or ask ask him who his CG was last year he served then do a google search. If the name does not match put a pistol to his head and gently squeeze the trigger....
 
#16
Back in the mid 80's the FBI blokes working out of Lakenheath were OSI.
(Office of Special Intelligence)
This info wasn't secret
Don't know if it is still current
 
#17
Virgil said:
PassingBells said:
Now that Walt Spotting has become the official Arrse sport, together with Mong Slapping and Chav Baiting, I was wondering about the international version of the game.

I have an American down my local who claims to be a Green Beret. Now if he clamed to be UKSF, I could probably suss him out. However I only have limited experience with US forces at all let alone SF. Do they even have a boat house at (is it?) Ft. Bragg?

My clues so far:
- Built like someone who doesn't take excercise for a living,
- Claims to have served in SE Asia & S America,
- Currently doing something with the FBI.

Help please.
One simple question is to ask his specialty and MOS. It should be 18 series like 18E, 18C, 18B, 18D, etc., each corresponding to engineer, commo, weapons, etc. Ask what SFAS stands for (SF Assessment and Selection).

He should know where Camp Mackall is outside of Ft. Bragg, NC. Also ask which SF Group he was assigned to. These ought to be a start.
Virgel:

The 18 series MOSs were not around in the era of Vietnam or in some cases duties in South & Centeral America. The speciality, would be the same; however, in my years in SF my MOS changed many times in the same MOS (Job.) My final MOS was the 18C Engineer. He could also ask what the special club for 'Green Berets' name is on Ft. Bragg and its location. :wink:
 
#18
#19
Here's a real foreign walt.:

http://www.fayobserver.com/article?id=247392

He says he's a general: Records discredit claim

By Kevin Maurer

Paul Lemmen leaves a restaurant in downtown Chattanooga, Tenn., where he agreed to meet Observer reporter Kevin Maurer to discuss assertions that he has made false claims about his military record.
Paul Lemmen says he is a retired Air Force general, a veteran of combat in Vietnam and years of intelligence work.

Former friends say he has also told people that he was an officer in the Provisional Irish Republican Army who cut a deal that landed him in the United States.

Both versions of his life story raise questions. Air Force records provide no evidence that Lemmen was a brigadier general. Lemmen denies ever connecting himself to the IRA.

But despite huge holes in his stories, Lemmen managed to talk his way into a contracting job in Iraq. He spent part of his time there hanging around Special Forces soldiers from Fort Bragg, getting close enough that he flew back for the funeral of one who was killed in action.

Overall, Lemmen traveled to Iraq at least four times working for Blue Iraq, a communications and information technology company with military contracts, according to Lemmen and e-mails from Ryan Lackey, the owner of Blue Iraq.

Jaimie Brehler, a Durham-based investigator who checks out military imposters, said that Lemmen was the subject of an investigation by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. Chris Grey, a CID spokesman, said only that the command started an investigation of a contractor posing as a military officer in August 2005 and completed the probe in January. No results have been announced from that investigation.

It is a violation of federal law to wear military decorations without authorization.

Lackey, the owner of Blue Iraq, would not comment.

“Due to ongoing civil and criminal investigations, we cannot comment on this matter at this time,” he wrote in an e-mail to the Observer.

Brehler has exposed almost 300 people making fraudulent claims of military service.

“These cowards steal the last bit of honor and dignity by defacing the value of the medals,” Brehler said. “Many of them have never even served in the Armed Forces. This, to me, is a slap in the face to those who have ever served.”

Tennessee meeting
Lemmen says he is not a fraud. He says he is a victim of a campaign to discredit him.

He agreed to meet with a Fayetteville Observer reporter in Chattanooga, Tenn., last month. He moved there to start a contracting company with friends from Iraq.

Lemmen arrived at the meeting dressed in a green sweatshirt and jeans. He had a scruffy gray beard and a black watch cap. A bodyguard waited in a white truck outside the restaurant. When asked why he had a bodyguard, Lemmen said he had worked too long in the Middle East.

He chain-smoked through a 30-minute interview.

In that time, he insisted that the government mounted a disinformation campaign to discredit him after he told then-Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld that he could not spy for him any longer.

“I would no longer participate in an operation on the soil of the United States against United States citizens,” Lemmen said.

He says Rumsfeld told him to either “toe the line” or leave. Lemmen, who says he entered the Air Force in 1972, says he left the service.

“Since then, everything has been changed in my history,” he said. “Places that I worked no longer acknowledge that I worked there. Like the Air Force. They no longer acknowledge that they even know me.”

The Office of the Secretary of Defense dismissed Lemmen’s claim as unworthy of attention.

“It appears to me that this individual’s story is preposterous,” said Col. Gary Keck, a spokesman in the office.

Lemmen’s assertion of the disinformation campaign neatly explains the lack of records of his service, but does not fill all the holes in his story.

No records
The Air Force has no record that there has ever been a general by the name of Paul H. Lemmen.

There is no record of his promotion to brigadier general in the congressional record, which reports all such actions. No Lemmen appears on any Air Force Special Operations Command rosters, according to Matt Durham, a public affairs officer for the command.

A search of a database of all active and retired Air Force officers on the Air Force’s own Web site turned up no record of Lemmen.

In 1974, Lemmen says, he served with the 41st Air Rescue and Recovery Squadron in Saigon for six months. But the squadron history shows that the unit was in California then. The 40th Air Rescue and Recovery Squadron was the only rescue squadron in Southeast Asia at the time, retired Maj. Gen. Richard Comer said.

Comer served with the 40th then and said the squadron of 36 pilots was based in Thailand, not Vietnam. Comer says there were no Air Force squadrons in Vietnam at that time. He doesn’t know Lemmen.

“I don’t remember the name,” Comer said.

In 1980, Lemmen says, he was transferred to Hurlburt Field, Fla., to an Air Force special operations unit. He says he spent eight years based there, working as an intelligence agent. He says he was sent on various assignments, including a stint in Beirut where he witnessed the 1983 Marine barracks bombing.

Comer says he was assigned to Hurlburt Field in 1987. His service would have overlapped with Lemmen’s, but Comer says he has no recollection of him.

In 1988, Lemmen says, he left active duty and joined the Reserves. In the Reserves, he said, he racked up a total of 1,344 hours in fixed-wing aircraft and almost 5,000 in an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter. The helicopter is a modified version of the Army Black Hawk helicopter used by special operations forces.

“I don’t think there are many 5,000-hour helicopter pilots,” Comer said. He has 3,400 flying hours.

Comer, who commanded several Air Force special operations units and was deputy commanding general of the Joint Special Operations Command at Fort Bragg, scoffs at the idea of a disinformation campaign against Lemmen. He doesn’t believe the military could keep such a campaign under wraps.

“I’ve never been in an organization that can keep a secret,” he said.

Tom Clancy fans
According to Cheryl Krin, who has known Lemmen since the mid-1990s, he was telling stories about IRA connections long before he began talking about the Air Force.

Krin, a project manager from St. Louis, Mo., says she met Lemmen online. The two shared an interest in the spies-and-terrorist thrillers of Tom Clancy, and both signed into an Internet newsgroup on the novelist’s work.

Krin says that Lemmen told her he was a former major in the IRA who had served time in a British prison before striking a deal that allowed him to move to California under a witness protection program. She says he never mentioned his Air Force service when she first knew him.

In 1999, Lemmen, who was working as a Web designer, told her he foiled an attempt on his life by the IRA in California.

From California, Krin says, Lemmen moved to Florida as the general manager of a limousine company and an information technology consultant. Lemmen told her he moved because he was no longer in the witness protection program.

After the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Krin says, Lemmen told her he had been called into service to track down terrorists. She recalls that Lemmen told her he was commissioned as a colonel because of his IRA experience, but never mentioned Vietnam or his pilot experience.

“He didn’t become a colonel in the Air Force until 2001,” Krin said.

Lemmen told the Observer that he was promoted to brigadier general in October 2003.

Howard Berkowitz and Teresa Robinson remember Lemmen’s 2003 promotion dinner at a restaurant outside of Washington. The three of them — Lemmen, Berkowitz and Robinson — were all fans of science fiction writer Robert Heinlein and developed a friendship in an Internet newsgroup about the author’s work, they said.

Robinson would host dinners for the group in Washington.

On the day of the promotion dinner, Berkowitz’s car was not working, so Lemmen picked him up in a Jaguar. He was wearing an Air Force dress uniform with a colonel’s insignia.

“It had a wonderful sound system, playing Irish music, and he commented that it was his revenge on the British — playing Irish music in a British car,” said Berkowitz.

Robinson remembers Lemmen bragging about his car, house and gifts to his wife. She says he also talked about his time in the IRA.

“Somehow that didn’t go with all the other stuff,” she said. “If you used to be in the IRA, why are you telling me this? Is that something you’re supposed to be talking about?”

Robinson says Lemmen wouldn’t stop talking about his promotion to brigadier general. He said it was a secret, though, because it hadn’t been announced.

Robinson and Berkowitz remember Lemmen giving them colonel insignias as mementos.

In his interview with the Observer, Lemmen — who was apparently born in 1955 in Port Huron, Mich., not Ireland — denies ever telling anyone that he was in the IRA. He says that’s part of the disinformation campaign the government has launched against him.

Contractor job
Lemmen says he retired from the Air Force in April 2005.

Lackey, the owner of Blue Iraq, hired him three months later. Lemmen’s job was to make sure the company was living up to its military contracts and seek out new ones.

Lackey met Lemmen in an online discussion group about Iraq. Lemmen, who was working as a consultant in Nashville, knew several of Lackey’s friends and talked his way into a job with the company, Lackey said in e-mails to civilian fraud investigators obtained by the Observer.

“Apparently what he does is hangs out near military bases and buys people drinks, is around them socially, etc., and is vague about what he does,” Lackey said in the e-mails. “This then allows him to build up lots of low-value background, which, taken as a whole, can get real things issued.”

In Iraq, at least at first, Lemmen stuck close to the Army at Logistical Support Area Anaconda, a major American supply hub in Iraq.

Lackey wrote that Lemmen spent most of his time with enlisted soldiers, avoiding officers and the Air Force. He played a paternal role and often offered soldiers jobs with Blue Iraq or financial support.

Lemmen disputes that he avoided the Air Force, saying he stopped by for coffee in their area every morning.

Eventually, Lemmen started wearing an Air Force uniform with a star in Iraq, Lackey e-mails said. Pictures from that time supplied by the civilian investigators show Lemmen with Special Forces soldiers, wearing a pistol and body armor.

“I watched him get progressively bolder while in Iraq,” Lackey wrote.

3rd Special Forces Group
In Mosul, a city north of Baghdad, Lemmen met and befriended soldiers in Fort Bragg’s 3rd Special Forces Group.

When Master Sgt. Tony Yost, a 3rd Group soldier, was killed in Iraq, Lemmen went to the funeral at Arlington National Cemetery in December 2005.

Joann Yost, Tony’s widow, met Lemmen during a party in his suite the night before the funeral. Yost remembers that Lemmen was dressed in a leather bomber jacket usually worn by Air Force pilots. A patch on the breast displayed the rank of brigadier general.

She found him strange.

“I had a gut feeling something wasn’t right with this guy,” Yost said.

Her father, a man who had served 34 years in the military, including time in Vietnam, was with her.

“My dad said it was very odd that he wore rank as a retired man,” Yost said.

He and Lemmen started to talk. Yost says Lemmen told her father that he was in logistics.

She remembers Lemmen bragged that he forced the Air Force to fly him home because of how important Tony Yost was to him. He also promised to help get Joann Yost a job. He would occasionally slip into an Irish brogue.

“The sky was the limit,” she said. “He was the man that could get it all done. The man who knew everybody.”

She says Lemmen also talked about his time in the IRA and about secret missions in Vietnam.

“My husband never talked about what he did. He never talked about the missions in detail like this guy,” Yost said. Lemmen “flaunted too much. I’ve never in my life had any special operations guy give details and places. They never talk about it.”

She is angry at the memory.

“He stood over Tony’s casket and acted like, with tears in his eyes, how much he loved him,” she said. “It was all a farce.”

Tony Yost’s funeral was attended by dignitaries including Maj. Gen. John F. Mulholland, then commander of Army Special Forces Command. Lemmen, who was wearing civilian clothes, stayed away from them.

Severed ties
After the CID probe into reports of someone pretending to be an officer, Lackey severed Blue Iraq’s relationship with Lemmen. Lemmen says that Lackey never followed through with the company’s contracts and failed to pay his salary. Lackey says Lemmen was owed money, but left with company property.

Since his split with Blue Iraq, Lemmen has tried to generate other military contracting opportunities. He told the Observer he has partners in Kuwait, but when asked for contact information he said they had been arrested as suspected terrorists.

Lemmen hired Berkowitz, his Heinlein newsgroup acquaintance, in February. Berkowitz says Lemmen promised $10,000 up front and another $15,000 when the project — an Internet network for soldiers’ barracks in Iraq — got going.

Berkowitz says he completed the plans, but never received any money. When he called Lemmen demanding payment, he says he was told the wire transfer failed or that the money was frozen by the IRS. Berkowitz, who is no longer working with Lemmen, doesn’t think that Lemmen was motivated by money. He says its his impression that it was more of a “Walter Mitty” act.

“He always wanted to be a general and created a world where he could be one,” Berkowitz said.

Staff writer Kevin Maurer can be reached at maurerk@fayobserver.com or 486-3587.
 

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