Foreign Family Members and Joining the Intelligence Corps

Good day to all,

I have a British relative who could be interested in joining the British Army. She was born in France but has been living in the UK for 20 years and has a British passport.

Part of her family is French, including a member of the French armed forces.

Among the Corps she he interested in is the Int Corps. Could her French connections be a problem, if of course she was found suitable in other fields ? Is there a blanket policy or is it on a case by case basis ?

Considering the increasing commitments of HM's forces in French speaking Africa, is the French language a bonus at the moment when submitting an application?

Thank you for your inputs

F
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
She would need to apply and then the Army would be able to answer any questions she has, as opposed to your assumptions of her questions.
 

Dr Death

Old-Salt
Demandez à votre bureau de la force de carrière de l'armée locale, car il aura les réponses
 
Next door neighbour was Navy (invalided out). His wife was Chinese (divorced) and eldest child (daughter) had a Chinese passport, youngest child (son) has a British passport. She was very keen for years to join the army, lot of faffing from our marvellous 'new' method of joining up (because of Chinese grandparents) but eventually got the call (from a serving person) that she was very welcome to join the Int Core and she's been in about 18 months now.
 

Jonnynoname

Old-Salt
Good day to all,

I have a British relative who could be interested in joining the British Army. She was born in France but has been living in the UK for 20 years and has a British passport.

Part of her family is French, including a member of the French armed forces.

Among the Corps she he interested in is the Int Corps. Could her French connections be a problem, if of course she was found suitable in other fields ? Is there a blanket policy or is it on a case by case basis ?

Considering the increasing commitments of HM's forces in French speaking Africa, is the French language a bonus at the moment when submitting an application?

Thank you for your inputs

F
doubt it would be a problem if she passes the background checks. I remember years ago a friend of mine told me his older brother wanted to join the Int Corps. was very bright and had a Uni education. They never accepted him because he had involvement in some commie student group when at Uni... so he had to settle for the Royal Engineers :D
 
doubt it would be a problem if she passes the background checks. I remember years ago a friend of mine told me his older brother wanted to join the Int Corps. was very bright and had a Uni education. They never accepted him because he had involvement in some commie student group when at Uni... so he had to settle for the Royal Engineers :D
So, they got lucky and ended up with the Chosen :p
 

Jonnynoname

Old-Salt
So, they got lucky and ended up with the Chosen :p
was a freak anyway, liked his brother though who was in 4 RTR in Osnabrück. we often went on the piss if our leave crossed path. In fact i remember they were on a cape tour & i saw a Land Rover from them in stirling outside the train station. Gave me a lift back to Dunblane. I met a few of my old school mates friends from 4 RTR so they knew i knew them when i mentioned names. :D
 
Thank you all, I will forward her the information.
Tmk (happy to be corrected), all Int Corps personnel are DV’d. She may wish to make herself aware of the vetting process:

Some guidance on UK GSC if she has problems sleeping:
 

lert

LE
Good day to all,

I have a British relative who could be interested in joining the British Army. She was born in France but has been living in the UK for 20 years and has a British passport.

Part of her family is French, including a member of the French armed forces.

Among the Corps she he interested in is the Int Corps. Could her French connections be a problem, if of course she was found suitable in other fields ? Is there a blanket policy or is it on a case by case basis ?

Considering the increasing commitments of HM's forces in French speaking Africa, is the French language a bonus at the moment when submitting an application?

Thank you for your inputs

F
Tell her to try the Royal Marines. That's where we keep those we a predisposition for surrendering.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Good day to all,

I have a British relative who could be interested in joining the British Army. She was born in France but has been living in the UK for 20 years and has a British passport.

Part of her family is French, including a member of the French armed forces.

Among the Corps she he interested in is the Int Corps. Could her French connections be a problem, if of course she was found suitable in other fields ? Is there a blanket policy or is it on a case by case basis ?

Considering the increasing commitments of HM's forces in French speaking Africa, is the French language a bonus at the moment when submitting an application?

Thank you for your inputs

F
I'm first-generation Brit with metric shitloads of foreign relations, including, at the time of joining, folk serving in the militaries of a number of both NATO and non-NATO countries. I got very high-level vetting and, somehow, kept it for 22 years. That was many years ago, of course, but they do tend, if they like the cut of your jib, to be constructive in the interpretation of the rules.

Having UK nationality and 20 years' demonstrable residence can only be a plus.

I'd have thought that a very good knowledge of French would be a decided asset.

All you can do is ask. Bonne chance.
 
What I would say in regards to languages, regardless of what capbadge she joins, she needs to get her French language documented ASAFP at Shrivenham by completing the MODLEB exams. That way, any formation looking for a French speaker will have an upto date list.

Does she like languages or like learning them? If not, it might not make sense to seek out work as a linguist when French is not the only game in town.

The thing about languages is that you need to have something to say & you need a customer for what you're saying. If you see what I mean? There are lots of interesting trades in the Army, beyond a single language.
 
What I would say in regards to languages, regardless of what capbadge she joins, she needs to get her French language documented ASAFP at Shrivenham by completing the MODLEB exams. That way, any formation looking for a French speaker will have an upto date list.

Does she like languages or like learning them? If not, it might not make sense to seek out work as a linguist when French is not the only game in town.

The thing about languages is that you need to have something to say & you need a customer for what you're saying. If you see what I mean? There are lots of interesting trades in the Army, beyond a single language.
Thank you for you valuable inputs. I don't think she sees herself first and foremost as a French speaker. She is attracted to military life and then realized that having a second language could be a bonus. She's (was, now that is has closed...) at university studying sociology, aiming to specialize in criminology. I also told her to get in touch with her uni's UOTC.
 
I'm first-generation Brit with metric shitloads of foreign relations, including, at the time of joining, folk serving in the militaries of a number of both NATO and non-NATO countries. I got very high-level vetting and, somehow, kept it for 22 years. That was many years ago, of course, but they do tend, if they like the cut of your jib, to be constructive in the interpretation of the rules.

Having UK nationality and 20 years' demonstrable residence can only be a plus.

I'd have thought that a very good knowledge of French would be a decided asset.

All you can do is ask. Bonne chance.
You obviously got in before Crapita took over, who have to dot every i and cross every T.
 
Thank you for you valuable inputs. I don't think she sees herself first and foremost as a French speaker. She is attracted to military life and then realized that having a second language could be a bonus. She's (was, now that is has closed...) at university studying sociology, aiming to specialize in criminology. I also told her to get in touch with her uni's UOTC.
UOTC would be the best way forward.

Can I advise that she considers a role other than linguist/interpreter as you can end up being an assistant to, or following around, senior people all the time. Many other jobs benefit from a second language ability, and it also makes a nice distraction to get posted to something once in a while where you need to work in your second language.

I speak fluent German due to my mother, once I ended up in Germany in a non-linguist role I was more or less kept there. The specialism I worked in was manned by lots of locally employed German civilians and a half dozen British military who could effectively only order a beer in German. I was happy with that as it was using my professional skills, just that instead of working in english I was working in German with my German workforce and external agencies. Because it was known I had native fluency I did get dragged into translating for the occasional Colonel and a Brigadier once in a while, and found that acting as a full-time simultaneous translation conduit was very brain bending.
 
From what I understand, I don't think she aims for a linguist position. If she gets her Uni degree and applies for Sandhurst, anyway, I suppose that as an officer she cannot be "just" a linguist.
Considering she's into criminology, I would think that the RMP would be a natural choice but she is more of the hard working meticulous type than the leader type from what I know of her.
 
Thank you for you valuable inputs. I don't think she sees herself first and foremost as a French speaker. She is attracted to military life and then realized that having a second language could be a bonus. She's (was, now that is has closed...) at university studying sociology, aiming to specialize in criminology. I also told her to get in touch with her uni's UOTC.
Depending on where she is, there may be lots of different reserve units open to her? It could be worth her while looking those up and possibly joining a unit that she likes the feel of & the opportunities that are offered to her.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I will add it is useful to be conversant of the language of your potential adversaries; thus post Brexit I would imagine a French linguist would be very useful :)
 
I will add it is useful to be conversant of the language of your potential adversaries; thus post Brexit I would imagine a French linguist would be very useful :)
You'd be surprised by the number of overtures coming to France from the UK in defense matters since BREXIT. After decades of sabotaging the PSDC from within, now that you are out, it's like you are afraid of seeing it disappear !

:)
 

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