Fordson tractor

#81
Interesting crane attachment - can't remember seeing one of those before.

I'm wondering if its compressed air operated? Could that be a lifting cylinder in front of the radiator, and what looks like a small compressor in front of the driver - between the wheels, fitted to the belt pulley drive.
It could be air, although it might be a bit bouncy due to compressibility. It could actually be water (proper hydraulic)
 
#82
It could be air, although it might be a bit bouncy due to compressibility. It could actually be water (proper hydraulic)
The diameter of the cylinder suggested low pressure air, say 80 - 100 psi. You'd need a big tank somewhere for hydraulics.

If that is the compressor on the side of the tractor, could that be piped directly to the cylinder, no reservoir, that would limit the lifting speed. Then a small valve to lower under some sort of control. Obviously not designed to lift too much weight.
 
#83
The diameter of the cylinder suggested low pressure air, say 80 - 100 psi. You'd need a big tank somewhere for hydraulics.

If that is the compressor on the side of the tractor, could that be piped directly to the cylinder, no reservoir, that would limit the lifting speed. Then a small valve to lower under some sort of control. Obviously not designed to lift too much weight.
Could be. Never seen air used like that though. There were lots of water and oil based systems that housed the fluid in a wall around the lifting ram. I have an American Heil system that has twin rams with a gear pump and shuttle valve in between the two, other than a pto drive and an operating lever it is completely self contained (1929). I have also worked on sentinel systems that used water, albeit drawn from the freshwater tank, but with very large diameter rams which means they operate at a much lower pressure than oil systems.
 
#84
Could be. Never seen air used like that though. There were lots of water and oil based systems that housed the fluid in a wall around the lifting ram. I have an American Heil system that has twin rams with a gear pump and shuttle valve in between the two, other than a pto drive and an operating lever it is completely self contained (1929). I have also worked on sentinel systems that used water, albeit drawn from the freshwater tank, but with very large diameter rams which means they operate at a much lower pressure than oil systems.
I've found this information, with the same picture. I hadn't noticed the air receiver on the other side of the tractor:
Fordson RAF tractor - MLU FORUM

And a similar lifting arrangement shown here:
 
#89
Current state of play on the Super Major.
View attachment 372869
WTF is the springy-thingy hanging from the rollover bar - looks like Zebedee's bellend?
Some (many) years back a bloke round the corner to me was the local MoT tester. He was also a collector of vehicles, cars, vans lorries (incl. Diamond T) militaria (Dennis towed fire pump) and several Fordsons. If my old tow-car Sierra was looking a bit iffy for a pass, I'd get him talking about the Fordsons and offer to scour our dealers for bits he needed with a fax 'Wanted' poster. I'd usually get a "Just get that fixed" and a ticket.
 
#90
My mate put it there, it's some sort of toy dog that he got from a car boot frenzy.

That MOT tester is/was a top bloke!
 
#92
The Field Marshall is the only tractor I've seen with a cartridge start - big single cylinder engine. Everything else either hand crank/electric.
An old chap told me a story about delivering a Field Marshall ,

He was pop popping along quite happily and came to a downhill bit , still happily going pop pop down hill when pop pop turned to pop pop BANG ..... as the cartridge bit flew out the front of the engine and landed sizzling in a ditch , not that he had much time to look at that as his attention was drawn in two directions....

The first was the sight of an aviary full of birds in a garden next to the road taking flight as one and the netting over the top parting as the panicked birds gained their freedom .

The second and more pressing thing was the now engine compression less Marshall was gaining speed alarmingly downhill .

He eventually came to a halt in a hedge and in his words " Fucked off back down the road with a bit of rag , retrieved the cartridge thing out the ditch , started the Marshall again and pissed off quick before the missing birds were spotted"

Dave Bennett you were a legend.........the only man I've met who used a sledge hammer with a cut off handle like most people use a club hammer .
 
#93
Can't compete with tractor starting but I used to work on a site which had diesel powered pumps of the single Petters type. You stood on a small platform which was usually slippery with diesel, lifted the decompression lever, swung the handle like mad and then dropped the decompression lever whilst the engine was still spinning. At which point it might start. Or might not. Or might kick back if you mis-timed dropping the decom lever.

Lesson No.1 - don't wrap your thumb round the starting handle - if it does kick back it's a broken thumb;
Lesson No.2 - put some sand on the platform to give you some grip - sliding off the platform will rip the skin off your shin
Lesson No.3 - a drop of petrol in the diesel aids starting in winter
Lesson No.4 - Using Bradex Easy Start will make things worse in the long run
Lesson No.5 - Try to be upwind of the cloud of black smoke on start-up

1547918294449.png
 
#95
Ain't that the truth. The axles were shot. The front casting had to be bored and bushed to bring it back too. That's one effing heavy bit of metal! Trouble is the chink machined splines are off, there is nothing I can do about that, so I'm having to make adjustments elsewhere. But when done it will be tickideyboo.
 
#96
Can't compete with tractor starting but I used to work on a site which had diesel powered pumps of the single Petters type. You stood on a small platform which was usually slippery with diesel, lifted the decompression lever, swung the handle like mad and then dropped the decompression lever whilst the engine was still spinning. At which point it might start. Or might not. Or might kick back if you mis-timed dropping the decom lever.

Lesson No.1 - don't wrap your thumb round the starting handle - if it does kick back it's a broken thumb;
Lesson No.2 - put some sand on the platform to give you some grip - sliding off the platform will rip the skin off your shin
Lesson No.3 - a drop of petrol in the diesel aids starting in winter
Lesson No.4 - Using Bradex Easy Start will make things worse in the long run
Lesson No.5 - Try to be upwind of the cloud of black smoke on start-up

View attachment 372892
That reminds me of the old dumpers that I drove on building sites around 1970. They had a detachable starting handle, but the starting procedure was the same with the decompression lever. I lost control of the handle once and all I could do was shout "run!" The handle actually cleared the roof of an adjacent house when it spun off.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#97
I dont even own a bloody tractor, and being born in a big city know nothing about them. although some big ones come past my house dragging stuff
but I find this thread fascinating
 
#99
That's brilliant lighting in your workshop. What type is it? We just built a new 20' X 20' garage and I'm considering LED fixtures. You know what, I think I'll pop up a new thread on the subject.
Only had one bank of florescent tubes on today. There are a number of GRP panels in the roof which really help. Fitted a 2 post lift this month, which is why the trannie in the background appears to be levitating.

Love seeing other people's workshops!
 
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Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Only had one bank of florescent tubes on today. There are a number of GRP panels in the roof which really help. Fitted a 2 post lift this month, which is why the trannie in the background appears to be levitating.

Love seeing other people's workshops!
mines always nice and warm
too full of stuff probably
but its double skinned and insulated
morris refurb 089.JPG
 

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